Pro Spotlight: Moses Itkonen

Who are we?

Are we a product of all the decisions we’ve ever made? Are we the sum total of our actions? Or are we what we pretend to be?

If you ever get the chance to spend any amount of time talking with Vancouver, British Columbia’s Moses Itkonen about who he is, you’ll quickly discover his formula for identifying himself: He is what he eats.

Moses is a vegan, which means he’s decided not to consume any animals, or wear them out at night, or go into business with them. In a society where animals and their many tasty parts have been blended, sprinkled, chopped, tossed, and beaten into just about everything edible, being a vegan isn’t like being a liberal, or a Scorpio, or a notary public, it’s infinitely more difficult. It requires constant label reading, interrogating waitresses, and feeling like a jerk as you ask the host of a dinner party if they used any refined sugar in the apple pie.

Being a vegan at home is rough, being a vegan on the road is a whole other story. Once you’re 30 miles from either coast or a major metropolitan city, the statement, “I’m a vegan,” often draws the response, “Welcome to our country.” Finding animal-free products in the Midwest is like finding a particular needle in a 50-foot-tall stack of needles. So with all the traveling involved in being a top professional skateboarder, Moses’ complicated eating situation becomes exponentially more complicated. But he’s not complaining.

He makes the occasional slip in his vegandom, but only to save the time and patience of those he’s sharing the uncomfortable seat of some tour van with. In his decade of skate-related travel, he’s learned that not only are we a product of our decisions, a sum total of our actions, what we pretend to be, and what we eat. We are also only human, and to err is the ultimate expression of humanity.

With that in mind, one might say we are the mistakes we make, the concessions we give, and the sacrifices we endure. Moses, Colin McKay, and I sat down to talk about who Moses is.¿J.P.

TWS: Where did the nickname Moses come from?

Moses: Moses is the name I received at the Richmond Skateboard Ranch, a guy nicknamed Eve gave me the name. It originates from the initials M.A.S.S.¿I grew up in a town called Mission, and we had the Mission Association of Serious Skateboarders. I had M.A.S.S. painted on my griptape with liquid paper, and I guess it looked like “Mose.” Ever since then everyone’s called me Moses.

I though it was going to have something to do with having a religious background.

Maybe. I went to the Ranch every Sunday after church. At first that was the only time I went, because our church was in the city Vancouver.

What was it like to be raised in a religious home?

I had a great upbringing, my parents really love me, and I never really saw them argue or fight. So I have the advantage of having parents who love each other and live together. We didn’t have lots of money, but we got to do all the things kids love to do, like play sports and skate. They supported my skateboarding and built a ramp in the yard. They never tried to push religion on me. Some parents force their kids into their beliefs, but my parents just presented their beliefs to me. Of course as a kid I went to church, but after a certain age they didn’t get down on me when I stopped going and stopped believing in the Christ.

It wasn’t a problem?

There have been times, like when my parents were visiting me in the hospital after a night of partying turned out pretty bad and I almost died from a fractured skull. My parents presented me with a book called How To Read The Bible. Being Christians, they believe there’s a heaven and a hell, and they love me, so they want me to go to heaven¿it’s something they believe in. I was a choirboy at one time, singing hymns and all that stuff. It’s just not something I believe in.

Do they think you’re going to hell for not believing?

Hell is a pretty far-fetched concept. So is Heaven. How could you possibly do something in this very short lifetime that would warrant you spending eternity gnashing your teeth, or walking on streets of gold? Eternity is a really long time. The whole thing’s not logical enough for me.

So, in the place of a formal religion, what has your belief system become?

I believe in action and reaction¿that the things you do will come back to you one day. If you try to be positive, positive things will come to you; if you’re negative, negative things will come. If you live a really fast life, then your life will be over fast. If you consume a whole bunch of crap, you’ll start looking like crap. If you eat a lot of foods that take a long time to digest in your body, you’re gonna be slow. If you’re gonna go vandalize everything, your car’s gonna get smashed some day. You’re not going to be able to do anything about it.

So you believe in the karma system.

You get what you deserve.

How does vegetarianism fit into the picture?

I started out being really into animal rights, not killing or mistreating animals, and I feel strongly about that now, but there’s way more that I’ve learned through personal experiences that keep me into it. I’ve been a vegetarian for ten years now, nine years a vegan. I’ve found that what I consume comes out in a whole bunch of different ways. If you eat a bunch of meat, it’s gonna take a long time to digest, and you’re going to end up with all these problems. I’ve noticed that when people eat a lot of meat and fat they sleep longer, they’re negative, they’re unmotivated, and they don’t have energy. When an animal’s killed it has a lot of adrenaline running through its body, and I honestly believe that comes back in people who consume a lot of meat¿they get really aggressive. When you go to Japan you notice that people eat less big, fleshy animals; they eat seafood and rice, and they’re just not as aggressive, or big, or angry.

When you were eating meat did it ever make you do something crazy and aggressive?

Like what?

Like, did you ever eat a four-pound steak and go rob a bank?

Moses laughs Um, I don’t think so …

Colin McKay: He got fired from Dairy Queen for stealing hamburgers. Colin laughs

Just before I became a vegetarian, I had a job at Dairy Queen for six months, and I got fired for stealing hamburgers. Colin laughs again. I guess the quest for the meat made me break the law. They were gonna throw the burgers out anyway, so I didn’t see any harm in throwing a couple extra patties in my bag. Colin laughs even harder

You make a living on the road, going town to town, crappy restaurant to crappy restaurant; does that make it hard to be a vegan?

I have to make small exceptions, like I know the white bread they serve me in restaurants might have some kind of animal products¿a small amount of processed lard. I can’t go around asking every waiter to show me the ingredients in everything I eat, and I can’t inconvenience the team or whoever I’m traveling with to search the town for a proper place for me to eat¿it could really get in the way of my job and my life. I don’t want being a vegan to be my life, it’s just the way I eat. At home I can pull it off, but on the road I’m sure I consume a certain amount of animal products. I’m not really militant about it, because being a vegan it will eventually affect my life in a negative way.

At what point did you realize how seriously your eating affected who you are and how you act?

These are things I’ve been learning more recently. I’ve slowed down eating refined sugar, and it’s helped me feel a lot better after skating. I’m not sore, my joints don’t ache. Sugar has a lot to do with arthritis, it’s a pretty powerful drug. Try not eating it for a week¿you’ll realize how much you crave it. And you’ll probably start feeling better after a week. I sure did. I was smoking pretty heavy, and that made me feel pretty negative. I’ve got a bit of a temper, and smoking made my fuse really short. I’ve blown up a few times, and it’s gotten me in trouble. I grew up finding myself in situations where I was getting punched by grown men¿I was just a little kid, and security guards would give me cheap shots. When you’ve gotten pushed long enough, you want to push back. If someone treats me with disrespect or violence, I’m gonna react violently. I’ve realized that being healthier and quitting smoking makes that fuse a little longer, so hopefully I won’t blow up so easily and hurt myself, or cause myself legal problems. Shit happens, you just need to be able to look back on things and learn from the past, and try not to make the same mistakes again.

So who are the Red Dragons?

“Red Dragons” started out as something to yell at security guards when they were kicking us out of a spot. We were mocking gangs that were around, and it ended up being our thing. The Red Dragons have been around as a crew since 1988. There used to be a whole lot of us, like over 25¿just a big, huge gang of kids who skated all day and smashed shit all night.

Was there any particular security guard you guys focused on?

Colin: Oh yeah.

The guy who really stood out was Robocop. He rode a mountain bike around …

Colin: No, he was a motorbike cop. All the other cops were running the stock Harley cop motorbike, but for some reason this guy had a brand-new, sick BMW motorbike. So we called him Robocop.

And he always wrote us tickets. I got ten tickets at the New Spot in Vancouver. I got two tickets there in one day. It’s funny, I never paid them. Oh well.

So do you have a warrant out for your arrest?

Well, in Canada skating’s like jaywalking, it’s not a real offense, it doesn’t go on your record or anything.

Why does Robocop care so much?

I think he’s got to fill his quota of tickets, and we were easy prey.

Did you ever get in any physical confrontations with that guy?

Colin: No.

We never got in any battles with the police.

Colin: We suggest not trying to fight police officers.

I think security guards have something to prove. They failed out of the police academy, they have chips on their shoulders, and some of them are really wild. I don’t think they screen them. They give these people a little more power than they deserve¿legally they’re not supposed to touch you.

Colin: It’s different in the States¿security guards carry guns and shit.

In Canada they don’t have guns or any type of weapons. So whenever we battled, it was little kids with boards against big men with nothing. Laughter

So did you guys win your fair share of the battles?

Colin: All of them.

We had strength in numbers.

Who were the original Red Dragons?

Rob “Sluggo” Boyce, Colin McKay, Sean “Teenager” Laidlaw, George and Gordon Faulkner, Mike Chalmers, John Munroe, Justin Lukin, Shane Ioki, Sam Devlin, tons of guys. Who else did we have?

Colin: There were other heads, but a lot of them stopped skating.

People moved on to other things, but most of the people who still represent the Red Dragon way are riding their boards.

How did the Red Dragons turn into a business?

We opened a store¿RDS Skate Supply¿and now we have a clothing company called Red Dragon. People in skateboarding know us as the Red Dragons, so it was just logical to name the clothing and the shop after our crew.

Are you a businessman now?

I don’t know if I really consider myself a businessman. I guess I am. It gives me something to do when I’m not skateboarding. When you get older, you can’t skate twelve hours a day, because your body starts to hurt. I try to skate three or four hours a day, but it’s a long day, so I’ve got time to do stuff. I work on design and production for Red Dragon, and making sure thed. I was smoking pretty heavy, and that made me feel pretty negative. I’ve got a bit of a temper, and smoking made my fuse really short. I’ve blown up a few times, and it’s gotten me in trouble. I grew up finding myself in situations where I was getting punched by grown men¿I was just a little kid, and security guards would give me cheap shots. When you’ve gotten pushed long enough, you want to push back. If someone treats me with disrespect or violence, I’m gonna react violently. I’ve realized that being healthier and quitting smoking makes that fuse a little longer, so hopefully I won’t blow up so easily and hurt myself, or cause myself legal problems. Shit happens, you just need to be able to look back on things and learn from the past, and try not to make the same mistakes again.

So who are the Red Dragons?

“Red Dragons” started out as something to yell at security guards when they were kicking us out of a spot. We were mocking gangs that were around, and it ended up being our thing. The Red Dragons have been around as a crew since 1988. There used to be a whole lot of us, like over 25¿just a big, huge gang of kids who skated all day and smashed shit all night.

Was there any particular security guard you guys focused on?

Colin: Oh yeah.

The guy who really stood out was Robocop. He rode a mountain bike around …

Colin: No, he was a motorbike cop. All the other cops were running the stock Harley cop motorbike, but for some reason this guy had a brand-new, sick BMW motorbike. So we called him Robocop.

And he always wrote us tickets. I got ten tickets at the New Spot in Vancouver. I got two tickets there in one day. It’s funny, I never paid them. Oh well.

So do you have a warrant out for your arrest?

Well, in Canada skating’s like jaywalking, it’s not a real offense, it doesn’t go on your record or anything.

Why does Robocop care so much?

I think he’s got to fill his quota of tickets, and we were easy prey.

Did you ever get in any physical confrontations with that guy?

Colin: No.

We never got in any battles with the police.

Colin: We suggest not trying to fight police officers.

I think security guards have something to prove. They failed out of the police academy, they have chips on their shoulders, and some of them are really wild. I don’t think they screen them. They give these people a little more power than they deserve¿legally they’re not supposed to touch you.

Colin: It’s different in the States¿security guards carry guns and shit.

In Canada they don’t have guns or any type of weapons. So whenever we battled, it was little kids with boards against big men with nothing. Laughter

So did you guys win your fair share of the battles?

Colin: All of them.

We had strength in numbers.

Who were the original Red Dragons?

Rob “Sluggo” Boyce, Colin McKay, Sean “Teenager” Laidlaw, George and Gordon Faulkner, Mike Chalmers, John Munroe, Justin Lukin, Shane Ioki, Sam Devlin, tons of guys. Who else did we have?

Colin: There were other heads, but a lot of them stopped skating.

People moved on to other things, but most of the people who still represent the Red Dragon way are riding their boards.

How did the Red Dragons turn into a business?

We opened a store¿RDS Skate Supply¿and now we have a clothing company called Red Dragon. People in skateboarding know us as the Red Dragons, so it was just logical to name the clothing and the shop after our crew.

Are you a businessman now?

I don’t know if I really consider myself a businessman. I guess I am. It gives me something to do when I’m not skateboarding. When you get older, you can’t skate twelve hours a day, because your body starts to hurt. I try to skate three or four hours a day, but it’s a long day, so I’ve got time to do stuff. I work on design and production for Red Dragon, and making sure the team’s got stuff. We’re small, just starting out.

Have you had a real job before?

Yeah, I’ve worked a bunch of jobs. The first skateboard I ever bought was with money I earned working in berry fields. I had a little yellow plastic board that I stole from my neighbor. I skated that for a week and lost it. I wanted a board, so I worked in a berry field for three weeks, earned a couple-hundred bucks, and bought a cheap, generic board that was pretty good. My first proper board was a Vision Old Ghost with Rat Bone wheels. I worked on commercial fishing boats a couple summers¿my dad and uncle were into that for a while. I was a deckhand; I cleaned and gutted thousands of salmon and fetched the guys sandwiches. It was nasty, dirty, and smelly, but it was cool to spend the summer on the ocean. I made a lot of money, too. In three weeks I made 3,000 dollars¿that’s a lot of money for a thirteen year old. Don’t ask me what I did with it … probably bought a lot of candy and played video games. After that I worked at Dairy Queen. My last real job was in telemarketing. That was the worst ever¿six months of trying to convince Americans to buy Canadian lottery tickets over the phone. A lot of Americans bought them, because the Canadian lottery is paid out all at once. So if you win 10-million, you get 10-million the next day, and there’s no tax on it in Canada. The only problem is you’ll get struck by lightning before you win any money.

When did you start getting free stuff?

My first board sponsor was Powell Peralta; I started getting boards from them around ’89. I eventually moved on to other companies: Real, then Mad Circle, then Platinum, now I’m back Powell. I’ve gone full-circle.

When you were a kid, did you want to be a pro skater?

I swear, it didn’t even cross my mind until the Real team manager mentioned it to me after I filmed an am spotlight thing for the first 411. The manager came up to me and told me they were stoked on it; they wanted me to be their next pro. I was like, “Cool, I’ll have a board of my own.” I didn’t work out with Real, but after Real kicked me off, Justin Girard, a really cool guy …

Why did Real kick you off?

I guess I was a little too lippy for a young kid. They didn’t think I was going anywhere, and they didn’t want to deal with the headache of a kid telling them what to do. I was a bit of a mouthpiece. Justin Girard hooked me up and did a lot for me. It’s too bad Mad Circle wasn’t properly backed and supported, because it could have done really well. So I went pro at the first Slam City contest. Was that five years ago?

Six.

Platinum wasn’t able to send me around traveling enough. Powell has a really tight operation, and they can give me the support I need with contests and travel; they have the best wood and fastest bearings by far.

Are we coming into another skatepark era?

In B.C. British Columbia we have over 30 parks, so I think we’re a little ahead, but California’s catching up with skateparks popping up all over. It’s unfortunate that a lot of them seem temporary¿wood and metal ramps that can be packed up in a couple days. The parks that are really here to stay are the ones made out of concrete, and all of B.C.’s parks are concrete. I think there’s a demand for them, and enough parents are getting involved and raising a fuss¿they want somewhere for their kids to go.

With cities making skating illegal and architects figuring out how to design things so you can’t skateboard on them, will it eventually be that you just can’t street skate at all?

At the spots in Vancouver, we witnessed people on top of buildings filming us with video cameras and taking photos through the windows of vans, actually researching and investigating what we were doing. They learned how to make spots unskateable by using their observations … I don’t even want to get into it. I don’t want anyone using my knowledge against us. But they figured it out, and architects are now designing buildings with features that make seemingly skateable spots unskateable.

Whiich government agencies are spying on you?

I don’t know, but I want to bomb them joking laughter. The Red Dragons will find out, and the karma will come back to those guys.

I think skateparks will get really fun. If you think about it, a street spot can be replicated. So many parks that go up are useless¿they’re a gesture, not a legitimate park. They’re excuses so cops can say, “Well, there’s a skateboard park you can go to.” Everyone knows the park sucks, but that way the city council feels like they’ve done something. If they actually put in some time and effort and built a quality park, I think it could be a lot more fun than the street.

What do you think about television’s involvement in skateboarding?

TV is there to sell you stuff. They show skateboarding on TV because a percentage of the population¿the consumer population¿want to see it, but because they can’t really understand skateboarding fully yet, they only really understand going high, going fast, flipping around, standing on your hand, and falling down¿therefore you see street luge. In a few years you’re going to have a big population that really understands and appreciates skateboarding and the technical aspects of it.

Colin: So, someday you’re gonna have fat, couch-potato fans cheering for skaters.

The age of the skateboard fan is coming. People already collect skateboard memorabilia, and they might not be skateboarding themselves, but they buy skateboard products, and they’re fans of skateboarding. I’m a skateboard fan. I’ll be watching the young guys on TV with their multi-million-dollar contracts. It will keep progressing to that point.

Do you think you’ll be around for the multi-million-dollar contracts?

I don’t think so. I’m gonna be like one of those old ex-pro hockey players in Canada you read the occasional article about. They’re living in a trailer home, bitching about how they toured around on a bus, had only one pair of skates, and didn’t get paid nothing. Everyone kind of respects them and knows they were the pioneers who were there at the beginning of the sport but never got paid. I’ll be one of those guys.

Bitter?

Nah, I’m not gonna be bitter. That’s why pros like Rick McCrank and I are getting into skate businesses like Red Dragon and Momentum. I’m gonna skate until I can’t anymore. I just want to be involved in skateboarding in some way for the rest of my life.am’s got stuff. We’re small, just starting out.

Have you had a real job before?

Yeah, I’ve worked a bunch of jobs. The first skateboard I ever bought was with money I earned working in berry fields. I had a little yellow plastic board that I stole from my neighbor. I skated that for a week and lost it. I wanted a board, so I worked in a berry field for three weeks, earned a couple-hundred bucks, and bought a cheap, generic board that was pretty good. My first proper board was a Vision Old Ghost with Rat Bone wheels. I worked on commercial fishing boats a couple summers¿my dad and uncle were into that for a while. I was a deckhand; I cleaned and gutted thousands of salmon and fetched the guys sandwiches. It was nasty, dirty, and smelly, but it was cool to spend the summer on the ocean. I made a lot of money, too. In three weeks I made 3,000 dollars¿that’s a lot of money for a thirteen year old. Don’t ask me what I did with it … probably bought a lot of candy and played video games. After that I worked at Dairy Queen. My last real job was in telemarketing. That was the worst ever¿six months of trying to convince Americans to buy Canadian lottery tickets over the phone. A lot of Americans bought them, because the Canadian lottery is paid out all at once. So if you win 10-million, you get 10-million the next day, and there’s no tax on it in Canada. The only problem is you’ll get struck by lightning before you win any money.

When did you start getting free stuff?

My first board sponsor was Powell Peralta; I started getting boards from them around ’89. I eventually moved on to other companies: Real, then Mad Circle, then Platinum, now I’m back Powell. I’ve gone full-circle.

When you were a kid, did you want to be a pro skater?

I swear, it didn’t even cross my mind until the Real team manager mentioned it to me after I filmed an am spotlight thing for the first 411. The manager came up to me and told me they were stoked on it; they wanted me to be their next pro. I was like, “Cool, I’ll have a board of my own.” I didn’t work out with Real, but after Real kicked me off, Justin Girard, a really cool guy …

Why did Real kick you off?

I guess I was a little too lippy for a young kid. They didn’t think I was going anywhere, and they didn’t want to deal with the headache of a kid telling them what to do. I was a bit of a mouthpiece. Justin Girard hooked me up and did a lot for me. It’s too bad Mad Circle wasn’t properly backed and supported, because it could have done really well. So I went pro at the first Slam City contest. Was that five years ago?

Six.

Platinum wasn’t able to send me around traveling enough. Powell has a really tight operation, and they can give me the support I need with contests and travel; they have the best wood and fastest bearings by far.

Are we coming into another skatepark era?

In B.C. British Columbia we have over 30 parks, so I think we’re a little ahead, but California’s catching up with skateparks popping up all over. It’s unfortunate that a lot of them seem temporary¿wood and metal ramps that can be packed up in a couple days. The parks that are really here to stay are the ones made out of concrete, and all of B.C.’s parks are concrete. I think there’s a demand for them, and enough parents are getting involved and raising a fuss¿they want somewhere for their kids to go.

With cities making skating illegal and architects figuring out how to design things so you can’t skateboard on them, will it eventually be that you just can’t street skate at all?

At the spots in Vancouver, we witnessed people on top of buildings filming us with video cameras and taking photos through the windows of vans, actually researching and investigating what we were doing. They learned how to make spots unskateable by using their observations … I don’t even want to get into it. I don’t want anyone using my knowledge against us. But they figured it out, and architects are now designing buildings with features that make seemingly skateable spots unskateable.

Which government agencies are spying on you?

I don’t know, but I want to bomb them joking laughter. The Red Dragons will find out, and the karma will come back to those guys.

I think skateparks will get really fun. If you think about it, a street spot can be replicated. So many parks that go up are useless¿they’re a gesture, not a legitimate park. They’re excuses so cops can say, “Well, there’s a skateboard park you can go to.” Everyone knows the park sucks, but that way the city council feels like they’ve done something. If they actually put in some time and effort and built a quality park, I think it could be a lot more fun than the street.

What do you think about television’s involvement in skateboarding?

TV is there to sell you stuff. They show skateboarding on TV because a percentage of the population¿the consumer population¿want to see it, but because they can’t really understand skateboarding fully yet, they only really understand going high, going fast, flipping around, standing on your hand, and falling down¿therefore you see street luge. In a few years you’re going to have a big population that really understands and appreciates skateboarding and the technical aspects of it.

Colin: So, someday you’re gonna have fat, couch-potato fans cheering for skaters.

The age of the skateboard fan is coming. People already collect skateboard memorabilia, and they might not be skateboarding themselves, but they buy skateboard products, and they’re fans of skateboarding. I’m a skateboard fan. I’ll be watching the young guys on TV with their multi-million-dollar contracts. It will keep progressing to that point.

Do you think you’ll be around for the multi-million-dollar contracts?

I don’t think so. I’m gonna be like one of those old ex-pro hockey players in Canada you read the occasional article about. They’re living in a trailer home, bitching about how they toured around on a bus, had only one pair of skates, and didn’t get paid nothing. Everyone kind of respects them and knows they were the pioneers who were there at the beginning of the sport but never got paid. I’ll be one of those guys.

Bitter?

Nah, I’m not gonna be bitter. That’s why pros like Rick McCrank and I are getting into skate businesses like Red Dragon and Momentum. I’m gonna skate until I can’t anymore. I just want to be involved in skateboarding in some way for the rest of my life.wledge against us. But they figured it out, and architects are now designing buildings with features that make seemingly skateable spots unskateable.

Which government agencies are spying on you?

I don’t know, but I want to bomb them joking laughter. The Red Dragons will find out, and the karma will come back to those guys.

I think skateparks will get really fun. If you think about it, a street spot can be replicated. So many parks that go up are useless¿they’re a gesture, not a legitimate park. They’re excuses so cops can say, “Well, there’s a skateboard park you can go to.” Everyone knows the park sucks, but that way the city council feels like they’ve done something. If they actually put in some time and effort and built a quality park, I think it could be a lot more fun than the street.

What do you think about television’s involvement in skateboarding?

TV is there to sell you stuff. They show skateboarding on TV because a percentage of the population¿the consumer population¿want to see it, but because they can’t really understand skateboarding fully yet, they only really understand going high, going fast, flipping around, standing on your hand, and falling down¿therefore you see street luge. In a few years you’re going to have a big population that really understands and appreciates skateboarding and the technical aspects of it.

Colin: So, someday you’re gonna have fat, couch-potato fans cheering for skaters.

The age of the skateboard fan is coming. People already collect skateboard memorabilia, and they might not be skateboarding themselves, but they buy skateboard products, and they’re fans of skateboarding. I’m a skateboard fan. I’ll be watching the young guys on TV with their multi-million-dollar contracts. It will keep progressing to that point.

Do you think you’ll be around for the multi-million-dollar contracts?

I don’t think so. I’m gonna be like one of those old ex-pro hockey players in Canada you read the occasional article about. They’re living in a trailer home, bitching about how they toured around on a bus, had only one pair of skates, and didn’t get paid nothing. Everyone kind of respects them and knows they were the pioneers who were there at the beginning of the sport but never got paid. I’ll be one of those guys.

Bitter?

Nah, I’m not gonna be bitter. That’s why pros like Rick McCrank and I are getting into skate businesses like Red Dragon and Momentum. I’m gonna skate until I can’t anymore. I just want to be involved in skateboarding in some way for the rest of my life.

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