Dying To Live, Zero Behind The Video

Adrian Lopez

What was the deal with the death threat? How seriously did you take it?

At first, I didn’t take it that serious, or at least I was pretending not to, but Jamie had someone at Black Box report it to the police. A detective called me up the day before the premiere and told me that the letter was nothing but serious, so I decided since my family and friends were there I’d just play it safe. I brought my guardian angel with me–or should I say, Hell’s Angel.

Compared to the other two videos, how was filming for this one?

This video was really a hard one for me. It felt like I was behind the whole time, and I don’t work too well when I’m worried about catching up, but I did what I could under the circumstances. I’m just glad it’s over and I can start out fresh and film for the C1RCA video.

How did the rest of the team react to you flying business class on the Zero world tour?

Every one of them flipped me off as they passed by. I guess it was annoying to see me in a recliner chair with a glass of champagne in one hand toasting them before takeoff. It was expensive, but the look on Lee Dawg’s face made it worth every penny. They’re all a bunch of peasants!

Jon Allie

This is your first major video part. What kind of extra pressures were on you to come through?

I didn’t stress about the video at first. I just thought I’d try and get gnarly. When the deadline was coming up, Jamie told me that I had a chance at first part. After that, the pressure was on, but in a motivating way. Then I had to deal with finding a song, which is probably the hardest thing. Without a good song, you’ll never be satisfied with your part.

Has the Z.T.F. (Zero Training Facility) helped you?

I live in Vista, California, and there’s nothing to skate during the week. I’d only get to skate on the weekend, so I’d get wrecked because I hadn’t skated all week. The Z.T.F. helped me learn everything I’d lost not being able to skate during work hours.

When did you know you were having first part?

Jamie and I had talked about it at least six months before the video was coming out. I knew for three months before the deadline, so I had to get gnarly.

 

Chris Cole

You just finished a part for In Bloom and then went straight into Dying To Live. How was that?

It was okay because I got an opportunity to go to a lot of different places and film with Jamie and Lee Dawg.

What sort of time frame are we talking about here?

Well, I had roughly six months to film. I got on Zero in March 2002, which was one week after I gave all my footage to Jon Holland for In Bloom.

Did you think you could produce another part in that amount of time and be satisfied with it?

I was scared in the beginning that I wouldn’t have enough time, but as the pieces came together, it got easier. It wasn’t until the end of filming for the video when it got harder–once I had holes in my part to fill, it got tough.

Knowing you had such a short amount of time to film, was there any extra planning put into it?

I didn’t want to repeat tricks that much. For each part, I try to find tricks that I haven’t done or variations of tricks that I had shown in other video parts. Of course, your strongest tricks will be repeated.

Did you make a trick list?

Yeah, but I ended up leaving it in Pennsylvania when I left for California.

Had you thought about the kickflip backside noseblunt for a while?

I’d thought about it for a couple months prior, but I couldn’t find the right rail for it. We stumbled upon that rail while on a C1RCA demo trip, and it seemed perfect for tt trick–it fit the bill.

I know there were some talks of you having the last part in the video over at Zero. How’d you feel about that?

I don’t know–it would’ve been an honor, but I don’t think the kids who watch the video wanted to see my part last. I think Jamie’s part was much more mature than mine–in variations, obscurities, and the way it was put together. It seemed like a part from someone who’s done a bunch of video parts.

Is there a different feeling riding for Zero that you didn’t get while riding for enjoi?

As far as what I’m riding and what I’m wearing, I’m more willing and happy to wear and ride Zero stuff. It feels rewarding when I see a kid sporting Zero product.

Ryan Smith

Why did you have party footage as the intro to your part?

I looked at my footage and saw that I didn’t have any lines or anything. It was pretty fast and chaotic, so I told Jamie to put in some quick partying footage of me and my friends. My buddy Sean Rogers had a party tape, and Lee and Jamie picked out the footage that worked the best for the video. It wasn’t planned out, but it definitely was the funniest stuff I’d filmed for my part.

What was your major reason for getting on Zero?

Jamie’s persistence. I mean, I was scared. I’d heard stories of Zero and how Jamie is a maniac. But I ended up procrastinating for so long that Jamie was like, “Get it together!” I was riding for a company before Jamie put me on flow, but flow for Zero pretty much means you can be on the team if you get your act together. It’s not like other big companies. With Zero, you’re more involved with the owner.

What expectations did you have filming for Dying To Live?

I didn’t really have any expectations. I just wanted to film a video part, and I knew Jamie was willing to go all over the world to get it done. We share a lot of the same ideas and stuff. I definitely could’ve used some more time to finish my part. I’d get stuff done, get hurt, and then go back to Canada and disappear–over and over again. The whole experience taught me a lot about how to get a video part done.

What’s the story behind “moose knuckles”?

Oh f–k! It’s a great Canadian secret/tradition. They only come out on older ladies–usually after they hit menopause–and sometimes on young men after a six-pack or so. Sweet little morsels.

In between filming trips, you had a lot of downtime in Canada. Would it eat you up knowing that the rest of the squad was in California or around the world getting stuff done?

No, I didn’t even know what day of the week it was. I’d just be at my homey’s house hanging with people who didn’t skate anymore–all they do is work and party, so I was pretty much nonstop partying. I couldn’t think about what was going on with the other guys until Cole got on–Jamie would e-mail me and tell me that Cole got like fourteen tricks in one day or some shit. So I stopped e-mailing Jamie.

What’s next for you?

I just got an apartment in California. I also got a sweet pimp ride–minivan. I’ll probably work on the DC video.

You left it until the last day of filming to crooked grind the rail at the end of your part. What made you wait so long, and what made you do it?

I was intimidated by it, so I put it off until the very last moment. Then, when I was there, I had to do it because someone else was there to do the same thing, so there was no coming back. It was the last day of filming, so even if I didn’t get it, Jamie would get a good slam of me–I’d get footage out of it somehow.

While I was there, I had a temper tantrum. I tried to break my board upside down on the last stair so I wouldn’t have to skate it, and all the board did was bend. It didn’t break, so Lee said, “It’s a sign,” or something cheesy like that. I was over it before we even got there, but Jamie just drove me there anyway and turned off the car. That’s happened a few times–I won’t be into trying something and Jamie will just take me there anyway. That’s part of the reason why people are scared to ride for Zero, but as long as you can manage to muster it together, you’ll be all right.

Was that all on your birthday?

Yeah, my birthday hammer.

 

Lindsey Robertson

In the intro to your part we saw some angst going down. Do you lose it on every skate session?

It’s hard if you don’t have trees and you’re eatin’ shit. I don’t lose it at skateparks–just when I’m filming in stressful situations. Sometimes it feels good to break a board every now and again.

When you stress out, do you usually get what you’re trying to accomplish? Or does the anger work against you?

No, I usually handle my biz. Stressing out helps me. When I lose it, I think, “Now I have to do it.” A trick will make me so mad that I have to do it.

Did you think your part was going to stand out and be as well received as it was?

No, I thought I was slackin’. I didn’t see my part until the premiere. But I saw what other people had, and when you see someone else’s footage it just blows it for you.

After frontside boardsliding to fakie the big rail at the end of your part, you asked how many stairs it was. Don’t you count anymore?

It didn’t matter to me. I knew there’re a lot of stairs, but I only looked at the rail–the thing’s just perfect. I was surprised on how good the rail really was. I’d never looked at it with actually skating it in mind.

Why didn’t you want to watch your part before the premiere?

It wouldn’t have been as exciting to me. I saw it maybe three months prior and thought, “Man, I need so much footage.” I was like, “I ain’t got nothin’–no combos.” But it all came together, I guess.

 

John Rattray

You didn’t reside in the States while filming Dying To Live. How did that affect the way your part came out?

Being as motivated as I was then, if I hadn’t been at the beck and call of Video Sergeant Dupont, then my part would’ve ended up being considerably less comprehensible. Not residing in the States was a slight hindrance in that respect, but not being surrounded by industry talk meant that I didn’t get caught up in thinking that I have to do this or that trick ’cause that’s the “in” thing. Although, I’m always working on some more modern tricks ’cause I like them. Anyway, it allowed me more freedom to skate the way I like to. However, I’m not completely happy with the part–there’re a couple things I’d love to change, but that’s what DVDs are for.

Is it an advantage to be out of the States?

You can definitely street skate more outside California. It’s a different place than the rest of the States, I reckon. I haven’t put my finger on it yet, but when I work it out, I’ll let you know. As for the question, it’s like most things–there’re pros and cons.

You spent last summer in Barcelona. How did that treat you?

Unfortunately, Barcelona is a terrible place. It rains constantly, there’re no friendly people, and there’s nowhere to skate. I wouldn’t advise anyone to go there. Esa es el contrario a verdad y cuando establa aprendía un par de ried to break my board upside down on the last stair so I wouldn’t have to skate it, and all the board did was bend. It didn’t break, so Lee said, “It’s a sign,” or something cheesy like that. I was over it before we even got there, but Jamie just drove me there anyway and turned off the car. That’s happened a few times–I won’t be into trying something and Jamie will just take me there anyway. That’s part of the reason why people are scared to ride for Zero, but as long as you can manage to muster it together, you’ll be all right.

Was that all on your birthday?

Yeah, my birthday hammer.

 

Lindsey Robertson

In the intro to your part we saw some angst going down. Do you lose it on every skate session?

It’s hard if you don’t have trees and you’re eatin’ shit. I don’t lose it at skateparks–just when I’m filming in stressful situations. Sometimes it feels good to break a board every now and again.

When you stress out, do you usually get what you’re trying to accomplish? Or does the anger work against you?

No, I usually handle my biz. Stressing out helps me. When I lose it, I think, “Now I have to do it.” A trick will make me so mad that I have to do it.

Did you think your part was going to stand out and be as well received as it was?

No, I thought I was slackin’. I didn’t see my part until the premiere. But I saw what other people had, and when you see someone else’s footage it just blows it for you.

After frontside boardsliding to fakie the big rail at the end of your part, you asked how many stairs it was. Don’t you count anymore?

It didn’t matter to me. I knew there’re a lot of stairs, but I only looked at the rail–the thing’s just perfect. I was surprised on how good the rail really was. I’d never looked at it with actually skating it in mind.

Why didn’t you want to watch your part before the premiere?

It wouldn’t have been as exciting to me. I saw it maybe three months prior and thought, “Man, I need so much footage.” I was like, “I ain’t got nothin’–no combos.” But it all came together, I guess.

 

John Rattray

You didn’t reside in the States while filming Dying To Live. How did that affect the way your part came out?

Being as motivated as I was then, if I hadn’t been at the beck and call of Video Sergeant Dupont, then my part would’ve ended up being considerably less comprehensible. Not residing in the States was a slight hindrance in that respect, but not being surrounded by industry talk meant that I didn’t get caught up in thinking that I have to do this or that trick ’cause that’s the “in” thing. Although, I’m always working on some more modern tricks ’cause I like them. Anyway, it allowed me more freedom to skate the way I like to. However, I’m not completely happy with the part–there’re a couple things I’d love to change, but that’s what DVDs are for.

Is it an advantage to be out of the States?

You can definitely street skate more outside California. It’s a different place than the rest of the States, I reckon. I haven’t put my finger on it yet, but when I work it out, I’ll let you know. As for the question, it’s like most things–there’re pros and cons.

You spent last summer in Barcelona. How did that treat you?

Unfortunately, Barcelona is a terrible place. It rains constantly, there’re no friendly people, and there’s nowhere to skate. I wouldn’t advise anyone to go there. Esa es el contrario a verdad y cuando establa aprendía un par de las cosas. Estoy bien ya comidatio, quieres café.

Now that you have your visa, what does the future hold for you?

Live here for a while (in California); drive around; skate pools, the Zero park, and the cities on weekends; shoot some pictures; learn stuff; read books–maybe; watch movies; mack dogg it; low ride in a Benzo; and perhaps a little HORSE.

At the Dying premiere, you were rocking a rather nice kilt. What’s the story on that baby? What’s kept in the sporran? Is that the official Rattray tartan you were sporting?

I wasn’t sporting a Rattray tartan because I had neither the time or the monetary units to gain possession of that highly prized fabric. Instead, I wore a hunting stewart. And in my sporran, there’re delightful surprises.

 

Matt Mumford

How much did injury affect your part?

Entirely, I’ve been hurt for almost a year. I’ve had a lot of downtime. I was lucky, though, because I’d been filming for a while and had stockpiled footage. I filmed the pool stuff with an injury right before we wrapped up the video, but those were the only things I got toward the end of filming.

Did you have any problems picking music?

Yeah, music is always hard. You want to find something unique. We bounced back and forth between a couple of songs. I ended up using that Queen song after playing it to myself 100 times. It all comes down to the feel of a song.

Knowing what you know now, would you have combined your Globe and Zero parts into one big video part?

When it comes down to it, I feel I did the right thing. I had two projects to do, and I had to split my footage up. Ideally, it would’ve been great to have the footage from both of those into one big part, but things don’t always work out the way you want them to.

I’ve noticed a lot of pool and transitions in this part compared to your others. Is this the future of Mumford videos, or will you go back to skating street?

To me, this part reflects what I really skate. That’s what I like to skate. I wanted a more rounded part in the past, but that type of skating would’ve gone unappreciated as opposed to now. It’s finally getting the recognition it deserves. I skated pools and trannys all along, so it was a good thing to get to film the kind of stuff I usually skate. I personally get more out of watching a person’s part who has all types of skating in it–more diverse.

Ryan Bobier

Did having to film for the Adio video halfway through the making of Dying To Live hinder what you were trying to accomplish?

No, actually, it was good because I’d get to go out skating with two different crowds who were filming for two different videos. While it was going on, I wasn’t into it–it was a little hectic. Looking back, it was sick. I got a chance to get away from one crowd, and then go hang out with another.

How’s it been seeing some riders leave and some new ones come aboard?

I was quiet around the old Zero team. I feel like I’m a lot closer to the guys on now. I was so young then and couldn’t go out and party with Ellington, Greco, and ’Wreck, but skating with them was sick. I was bummed when those guys left. But I don’t know, people come and go. I’m into how it’s set up now.

If you could vote anyone off Zero Island, who would it be?

Lee.

Was the video premiere your lucky night?

Yes, I drank Cristal.

When did you get your driver’s license? Did that make it easier to get your video part done?

I got it about eight months ago, when I turned sixteen. With a car, it was easier to meet up with people, but I never really drove to spots, anyway. I always just hopped in the Zero van.

So what now? Are you graduating school?

Yeah, I’m working on it. I’m going to school all the time now that the videos are over.

And then on to college?

Nah, I’m just trying to gradumatate.

 

Lee Dawg

Filmers don’t just film. Give us a list of your other duties in the field.

Research and development on spots, rider’s others–fathers, sisters, brothers, pastors, et cetera. I play a lot of crowd control at the spots. I talk the guys out of suicide when it doesn’t go well.

Does each skater get stuff done at the same pace? If not, is that a problem for you to work?

Definitely not. I take all of it into consideration. Everyone’s different. I can’t get on Lopez when things don’t work out the same

way I can with Jamie. Some guys are sensitive.

Can a skater have too much stuff?

I believe so. For example, Lopez used most of his footage, whereas some of the other guys got to pick and choose what to use–that rhymes.

Who decides what to slow-mo?

It’s a collaboration between the person, Jamie, and me. It’s based on feel, and how it looks to the music–very touchy business.

Who chooses the music?

I’d like to say all the riders

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