Photographer Check Out: Garric Ray

Portland, Oregon-based photographer Garric Ray has been living the skate life his whole life. He cut his teeth working in skate shops and constantly skating the Pacific Northwest. At 18 he blew out his knee skating and, in that down-time, became interested in photography. Tons of minimum wage jobs and saving money later, and he finally bought his first camera. Now, Garric has found his photographic style and his work has graced the pages of TransWorld, Thrasher, The Skateboard Mag, Kingpin, Concussion, and Automatic. Read below the gallery for a little Q&A.

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Mike Derrick, kickflip.

First camera you shot with: The first camera I ever owned was a Canon AE-1 that I bought from a pawn shop.

Camera kit you’re using now: A Canon EOS 1 DS Mark II for stills, a Canon EOS 1 D for sequences, two Lumedyne power packs and bunch of lens. And sometimes I use my Hasselblad.

Favorite point and shoot: Canon SD750 Digital Elph.

Favorite film camera: My Hasselblad 500 C, I worked so many shitty jobs to buy that thing! I really need to use that beauty more often. It just hurts the bank account if you use it too often.

First published skate photo: In TransWorld a couple years ago, it was for a skate park, feature my friend Robert Bemis was doing a tre flip down a set of stairs.

Best photography advice someone gave you: I’ve been really lucky and have gotten advice from the best photographers around (Brian Gaberman, Jon Humphries, Mike O’Meally, Bryce Kanights). Those guys always say fill the frame, and always try to have your photos lit as crisp as possible. Also, always keep your flashes at half power.

Your advice to up and coming photogs: Well to be honest, I still think I’m trying to figure that one out myself. In my personal experience I would say never give up! If you love shooting skateboard photos enough and you keep at it, things will hopefully just fall into place . Also, I feel like the best advice out there is the magazines themselves. If you look at those long enough you start to figure your lighting and angles, etc.

See more at garricray.com