Chad Tim Tim Pro Spotlight

California Weirdo
Words By Mackenzie Eisenhour


I had always pictured Chad as something of a quiet, just-here-to-get-my-skating-done type of guy. Everything about him seemed relatively normal for a Southern California-based pro skateboarder. However, over the course of this interview, I came to learn that, as with most of God’s creatures, Chad does have some skeletons in that old closet-alongside a surfboard. He punched a co-worker in the mouth at a seafood restaurant, his dad was a professional Ping-Pong player, he predicts tofu-based hover boards for the future of skateboarding, he studied a Plan B video with Val Kilmer in it, and he managed to run through an entire interview with his wife sitting only a few feet away.
After his banger of a part in A Time to Shine and the twice-hyped full-length Popwar video looming, it’s time for you, dear reader, to kick up the footrest, pour yourself a glass of lemonade, and read what the man with two first names as a last name thinks of this whole crazy mess we call skateboarding.-Mackenzie Eisenhour

How much elbow grease did you put into your A Time To Shine part?
This part was definitely something I worked hard on. Every skater is his own worst critic, and I’m no exception to that. But this is actually the first thing I’ve done where I’m actually really psyched on it. I mean, I’m proud of it for a change. But I did kind of fizzle out at the end. I think I got a little nervous at the prospect of the whole thing.

Had you put your mind into filming a whole part to that extent before?
No, not really. And actually right before I started filming for the part, I got married, and that just changed everything. It was such a huge motivator, because it was like, “I’ve got to take care of my wife now. What am I gonna do-quit skating and get a job again or what?” And actually, she really encouraged me, because what she told me was, “Do what you want to do. Follow your heart. If you want to skate, do it with all your heart.” So she just motivated me, and then that was it. From then on, I was focused. Other than that, Jason Hernandez just makes it so easy to go skate. You know, he has the baby Optimus, and if you need a drawbridge, he’ll make a drawbridge. If you need Bondo, he has Bondo-he just made it fun to go film again.

So how is married life treating you?
Pretty good. We’re coming up on a year now. It’s been great. The only crazy thing was that I’ve been traveling so much over the past year that we’ve been apart. I think it was like… (asking wife) “Hey, how long was it after we got married?” Two weeks. It was two weeks after we’d gotten back from our honeymoon and I left for two months to Barcelona. She was like, “Rad.” But I think it’s built perseverance into our relationship, because when I do get to come home, it’s always that much better.

Popwar seems like a tight little team and the image has been consistent since day one. What is the glue holding you guys together?
I think we definitely have a positive crew. It’s definitely been consistent. We’re still growing, though. We went through an ownership change with the old owners selling it to a new group of owners, which was kind of an iffy time period. We almost didn’t know for a second if we were going to be able to keep doing Popwar or not. But now our thing is settled and everybody knows what they’re doing, and that whole switch almost brought everyone closer together.

Who are some of the dudes on the team that you skate with on the regular?
On the regular, I skate with nobody (laughs). We all live so far away from each other. But the second we go on tour, it’s like we never left. It just clicks. But on the regular-Cairo (Foster) is always working hard on something. Kenny (Reed) is always off somewhere on his mission. Justin (Strubing) is just ripping and traveling. Everybody is sort of fighting their own battles right now and doing what they do.

When did you firsmeet Cairo?
It’s funny, actually. The first time I met him was right when he came out to California from Florida. And he doesn’t remember any of this, but my brother and I were skating the Huntington park and we saw this guy doing kickflips over a bicycle. So I asked him if he wanted to go skate the Huntington High School with us, and he came along. To this day, he doesn’t remember meeting us. He wasn’t riding for anyone yet, but he had showed up and was just killing it everywhere he went.

Did you start skating with your brother?
Yeah, he’s ten years older than me and got me into it when I was three or so. But living in Southern California, it’s like you’re pretty much going to surf, skate, or BMX, so I was surfing and skating a little, but I didn’t really get into skating as my only serious pastime until the summer before I was going into high school. The first video I saw was Plan B’s Questionable, but it was already like three years old or something. My friend had a copy of a copy of it, and it had certain parts in it that had been taped over by that movie Top Secret with Val Kilmer (laughs). I watched that thing so many times; it was almost weird later to see it without Val Kilmer in.

Do you still get tubular sometimes?
I was surfing and skating the whole time, up until I really got into skating. Eventually, I just didn’t have the patience for surfing. You’re just sitting out there waiting for so long. I’m a pretty impatient person and have a hard time sitting still, so eventually I just went fully into skating.

First real setup?
My first setup was a New School board, and I got it at a swap meet for twenty bucks. It was the one with the Irish dude on the bottom with his fist up. It was a slick, too. It lasted me a good year. I sanded the nose and the tail down to reshape it. I don’t even know why. It was probably one of the weirdest shapes anybody’s ridden. This was probably around ’94. It was pretty much right after the pressure flip days had passed. My pants were still humungous, though-huge jeans. I remember tre flips were probably the hardest trick for me to learn after I started doing tricks. I remember everyone could do ’em and they were just not happening for me. It was weird because I had been skating for so long but never really did any tricks.

First pro you wished you could be?
Well, I used to see Ed (Templeton) all the time at Huntington park. I remember I would just sit and watch whenever he was there. He was definitely a dude I looked up to. I eventually saw Daewon (Song) skate in person and that just blew me away. He was just so consistent and quick. It was ridiculous. I was a pretty big Jeron (Wilson) fan, too. Especially after he had that line with the switch tre over the hip in the Virtual Reality friends section.

Favorite Filipino meal?
Probably just rice, eggs, and Spam (laughs). That’s the staple. I’m a little white-washed, though. I kind of let the roots go a little, but I’ve been reaching for them lately because I’ve been hanging out with my dad more. He gets me back into the traditions, mostly the laziness (laughs).

Did your wedding carry out the Filipino tradition?
No. It was pretty basic-your average wedding. Oh wait, my wife’s hating on me now for saying it was basic. (To wife) How would you describe it? The most incredible day of my life (laughs). No, seriously, though; if anything, the only traditional thing about it was that it was on Filipino time-late (laughs).

So no barong?
Oh, that little see-through white shirt? It feels like it’s made out of rice paper, right?

Yeah, but they’re sick when it’s hot. They beat a sports jacket and tie.
I guess.

How did you get started on an actual skateboarding career?
Pretty much when I got on New Deal. I told myself at that point that I could just take skating and make a living off of it. Up until then, I was working at a seafood restaurant. I remember quitting that, and it was such a relief. Like, that was the point where I told myself, “All I gotta do is skate now.” I just had such freedom all of a sudden. I could wake up and just go skate.

First mainstream coverage?
Probably the couple tricks I had in Rodney Vs. Daewon. I had some in the World Industries part and then a couple in the Darkstar Wheels section. Kids still come up to me to this day and tell me they saw me in that. It trips me out. So many kids watch those videos.

How did you end up on Stà…ssy?
That’s a funny story, actually. I got in a fight at the seafood restaurant with some guy who worked in the kitchen. It’s pretty much the only fight I’ve ever been in. This dude was just cheap shotting for fun every time I went into the kitchen. Like, not hitting me for real but hard enough that it hurt. Eventually, he made me drop a whole bunch of plates, and I just kind of lost it and was like, “Look, you want to fight. Let’s fight for real, right now.” He seemed kind of shocked and was just like, “Nah, I don’t wanna fight.” I turned around and he socked me in the head from behind. Total sucker punch. Then we just went at it for a long time. We’re throwing punches back and forth right next to the dishwasher in the kitchen. I ended up catching one of his teeth on one punch and it cut my knuckle really bad. I guess a human bite is like way worse than an animal bite, and so this cut got totally infected. I had to go to the hospital for three days, and while I was there, I got this call from Robbie Jeffers, the Stà…ssy team manager, and he’s like, “Yeah, hey we wanted to know if you wanted to ride for us.” I was just laying there all depressed in the hospital and all of a sudden I’m riding for Stà…ssy.

What’s up now on the clothing front?
I ride for this clothing company called Insight, out of Australia. I love it. It’s definitely more my style. They have some crazy clothes. Somehow my new nickname is “California Weirdo.” Brian Brown started calling me that. I’m not 100-percent sure why. I might be a little weird at times, but Insight kind of fits with being a little weird. The funny thing is, Justin Reynolds works for them now, and he rode for Stà…ssy before that. So he’s hooked me up with my last two clothing sponsors. Thanks, Justin.

What sets Long Beach apart from, say, Costa Mesa?
It’s definitely more diverse than a lot of the surrounding towns. It’s like its own tight little community. It’s not Orange County and it’s not Los Angeles. It has its hectic areas and its mellow areas, but everyone seems to get along. I love it.

Who are your everyday LBC partners in crime?
Usually Stefan Attardo. He and I tend to cruise around here on the regular. I still see all the kids from the Cherry Park era. Terry (Kennedy) still cruises by every once in a while.

Do you see any difference between kids coming up now and how it was when you came up?
Oh yeah, for sure. I think the level that kids now are coming into skateboarding with is so much higher than when I came in. It’s just crazy. Kids now are way better rounded, too. They can pretty much skate everything and destroy it-tranny, handrails, ledges-it’s all in their repertoire. I think kids today are more style- and fashion- conscious, too. Not in a bad way really, but they just know what looks good and what doesn’t for the most part. I’ve just got to keep up with them now (laughs).

I doubt a lot of them work at seafood restaurants either.
(Laughs) Yeah, I definitely see the level of financial backing changing things, too. I see kids getting a lot hungrier sooner than before for all the sponsorship prizes. They’re certainly eager to get out there. It’s good in the sense that they’re skating hard and all the time. But I think for some of them they’re not necessarily doing it for themselves and will pretty much take any sponsor that is put in front of them. They like to land tricks and look at you, too. Like, “See that?” , and it was such a relief. Like, that was the point where I told myself, “All I gotta do is skate now.” I just had such freedom all of a sudden. I could wake up and just go skate.

First mainstream coverage?
Probably the couple tricks I had in Rodney Vs. Daewon. I had some in the World Industries part and then a couple in the Darkstar Wheels section. Kids still come up to me to this day and tell me they saw me in that. It trips me out. So many kids watch those videos.

How did you end up on Stà…ssy?
That’s a funny story, actually. I got in a fight at the seafood restaurant with some guy who worked in the kitchen. It’s pretty much the only fight I’ve ever been in. This dude was just cheap shotting for fun every time I went into the kitchen. Like, not hitting me for real but hard enough that it hurt. Eventually, he made me drop a whole bunch of plates, and I just kind of lost it and was like, “Look, you want to fight. Let’s fight for real, right now.” He seemed kind of shocked and was just like, “Nah, I don’t wanna fight.” I turned around and he socked me in the head from behind. Total sucker punch. Then we just went at it for a long time. We’re throwing punches back and forth right next to the dishwasher in the kitchen. I ended up catching one of his teeth on one punch and it cut my knuckle really bad. I guess a human bite is like way worse than an animal bite, and so this cut got totally infected. I had to go to the hospital for three days, and while I was there, I got this call from Robbie Jeffers, the Stà…ssy team manager, and he’s like, “Yeah, hey we wanted to know if you wanted to ride for us.” I was just laying there all depressed in the hospital and all of a sudden I’m riding for Stà…ssy.

What’s up now on the clothing front?
I ride for this clothing company called Insight, out of Australia. I love it. It’s definitely more my style. They have some crazy clothes. Somehow my new nickname is “California Weirdo.” Brian Brown started calling me that. I’m not 100-percent sure why. I might be a little weird at times, but Insight kind of fits with being a little weird. The funny thing is, Justin Reynolds works for them now, and he rode for Stà…ssy before that. So he’s hooked me up with my last two clothing sponsors. Thanks, Justin.

What sets Long Beach apart from, say, Costa Mesa?
It’s definitely more diverse than a lot of the surrounding towns. It’s like its own tight little community. It’s not Orange County and it’s not Los Angeles. It has its hectic areas and its mellow areas, but everyone seems to get along. I love it.

Who are your everyday LBC partners in crime?
Usually Stefan Attardo. He and I tend to cruise around here on the regular. I still see all the kids from the Cherry Park era. Terry (Kennedy) still cruises by every once in a while.

Do you see any difference between kids coming up now and how it was when you came up?
Oh yeah, for sure. I think the level that kids now are coming into skateboarding with is so much higher than when I came in. It’s just crazy. Kids now are way better rounded, too. They can pretty much skate everything and destroy it-tranny, handrails, ledges-it’s all in their repertoire. I think kids today are more style- and fashion- conscious, too. Not in a bad way really, but they just know what looks good and what doesn’t for the most part. I’ve just got to keep up with them now (laughs).

I doubt a lot of them work at seafood restaurants either.
(Laughs) Yeah, I definitely see the level of financial backing changing things, too. I see kids getting a lot hungrier sooner than before for all the sponsorship prizes. They’re certainly eager to get out there. It’s good in the sense that they’re skating hard and all the time. But I think for some of them they’re not necessarily doing it for themselves and will pretty much take any sponsor that is put in front of them. They like to land tricks and look at you, too. Like, “See that?” And you’re like, “Yep.”

How do you feel about all the money coming into it?
Well, it’s good to make money (laughs). But at the same time, the general public and a lot of these companies pouring money into it only see a small fraction of what skateboarding is. They might only see the contests or only certain dudes in a Mountain Dew ad. It’s a little jaded. They don’t understand going out every day, and getting kicked out after sitting in traffic. They will never understand the great silent majority of skateboarding. Like, they can’t grasp that I don’t enter contests and am out on the streets every day instead.

Skating is such a young sport. Do you think that with time, the general public might one day get it?
No, because to really understand it, you have to do it. You’ll never know the feeling of landing a trick you’ve been trying for two hours until you do it.

What happens to skateboarding when we run out of wood?
Maybe we go back to the future with some hover boards or something. No, I don’t know. I guess recycled wood. Maybe particleboard. Tofu wood. Hemp wood? I don’t know.

How do you approach a trick on something you consider a serious personal challenge? What is the process from imagining it to rolling away?
Jason Hernandez could probably give you the best answer on that one. It really depends on my mood. But one of my major problems when things aren’t clicking is I just think too much. I overanalyze things and then it just never works. On a good day, though, when my mind is clear, it usually just works. I focus on what the landing and rolling away is going to feel like. It all depends on my mind-set.

How much of skating do you think is mental and how much would you say is physical?
I’d say it’s 80-percent mental and twenty-percent physical.

Do you have any superstitions? Madness?
Not really. I stretch before I skate or after every time. That’s sort of a ritual. If I’m not getting a trick right or things just aren’t working, I pray and just ask for peace in my mind.

Does your spirituality ever enter your skateboarding?
Yeah, definitely. I mean, everybody comes from broken families or everyone has some kind of drama going on. It can definitely catch up to you while you’re on your board, and for me, praying and asking the Lord for peace of mind is just something that helps get my head in my comfort zone and not overanalyze.

Off-board hobbies?
Lately it’s been this PlayStation game called Guitar Hero. It has all these rad songs on it like Jimi Hendrix and Black Sabbath, and you have to play along with the controller. Other then that, I’ve been into Ping-Pong for years. My dad actually used to play on the pro circuit, so he’s really good. I’ve yet to beat him. My older brother beat him once. It’s kind of like a little family battle that has been going on since we were kids.

When does someone deserve to turn pro in skateboarding?
I think aside from a demand for his or her board, probably just a really good video part. Something where you can see them push (laughs) to really see what they’re capable of. These days, though, it doesn’t seem like as big a deal as it used to be. Getting your shoe is like the new turning pro.

How did it happen for you?
It really wasn’t that exciting, to be honest. Right after Seven Year Glitch ’02 they called me up and told me, asked me what kind of graphic I wanted, and that was pretty much it. I turned pro and then New Deal went under, so maybe that says it all right there (laughs). It was my fault.

Name three things you could never live without?
I’m going to go with God, my wife, and my skateboard-in that order.

All-time-greatest Long Beach skater?
I’ll name three-Rob Gonzalez, Ron Chatman, and Caesar Singh.

When is it time to stop trying a trick?
I think I’m just starting to figure that one out.

When will skateboarders conquer the world?
As soon as the Earth iss covered in concrete.




you’re like, “Yep.”

How do you feel about all the money coming into it?
Well, it’s good to make money (laughs). But at the same time, the general public and a lot of these companies pouring money into it only see a small fraction of what skateboarding is. They might only see the contests or only certain dudes in a Mountain Dew ad. It’s a little jaded. They don’t understand going out every day, and getting kicked out after sitting in traffic. They will never understand the great silent majority of skateboarding. Like, they can’t grasp that I don’t enter contests and am out on the streets every day instead.

Skating is such a young sport. Do you think that with time, the general public might one day get it?
No, because to really understand it, you have to do it. You’ll never know the feeling of landing a trick you’ve been trying for two hours until you do it.

What happens to skateboarding when we run out of wood?
Maybe we go back to the future with some hover boards or something. No, I don’t know. I guess recycled wood. Maybe particleboard. Tofu wood. Hemp wood? I don’t know.

How do you approach a trick on something you consider a serious personal challenge? What is the process from imagining it to rolling away?
Jason Hernandez could probably give you the best answer on that one. It really depends on my mood. But one of my major problems when things aren’t clicking is I just think too much. I overanalyze things and then it just never works. On a good day, though, when my mind is clear, it usually just works. I focus on what the landing and rolling away is going to feel like. It all depends on my mind-set.

How much of skating do you think is mental and how much would you say is physical?
I’d say it’s 80-percent mental and twenty-percent physical.

Do you have any superstitions? Madness?
Not really. I stretch before I skate or after every time. That’s sort of a ritual. If I’m not getting a trick right or things just aren’t working, I pray and just ask for peace in my mind.

Does your spirituality ever enter your skateboarding?
Yeah, definitely. I mean, everybody comes from broken families or everyone has some kind of drama going on. It can definitely catch up to you while you’re on your board, and for me, praying and asking the Lord for peace of mind is just something that helps get my head in my comfort zone and not overanalyze.

Off-board hobbies?
Lately it’s been this PlayStation game called Guitar Hero. It has all these rad songs on it like Jimi Hendrix and Black Sabbath, and you have to play along with the controller. Other then that, I’ve been into Ping-Pong for years. My dad actually used to play on the pro circuit, so he’s really good. I’ve yet to beat him. My older brother beat him once. It’s kind of like a little family battle that has been going on since we were kids.

When does someone deserve to turn pro in skateboarding?
I think aside from a demand for his or her board, probably just a really good video part. Something where you can see them push (laughs) to really see what they’re capable of. These days, though, it doesn’t seem like as big a deal as it used to be. Getting your shoe is like the new turning pro.

How did it happen for you?
It really wasn’t that exciting, to be honest. Right after Seven Year Glitch ’02 they called me up and told me, asked me what kind of graphic I wanted, and that was pretty much it. I turned pro and then New Deal went under, so maybe that says it all right there (laughs). It was my fault.

Name three things you could never live without?
I’m going to go with God, my wife, and my skateboard-in that order.

All-time-greatest Long Beach skater?
I’ll name three-Rob Gonzalez, Ron Chatman, and Caesar Singh.

When is it time to stop trying a trick?
I think I’m just starting to figure that one out.

When will skateboarders conquer the world?
As soon as the Earth is covered in concrete.




Earth is covered in concrete.