The first in a series of short interviews with those involved in Cliché‘s newest video, Clé.

Cliché’s filmer/editor behind Clé, Junior, gave us a few minutes of his time to discuss his favorite part in its latest video.

Interview by Blair Alley

Photo by Olivier Chassignole

What’s your background in filming: Who have you worked for, how long have you been filming, what video projects did you work on prior to Clé?
I started filming in 2002-2003. The first video I shot was for a friend’s skateshop Wall Street here in Lyon, France. the video is called Olé.
At the same time French Fred started working for Cliché and started filming Bon Appetit. He was looking for a second angle and some help with the team. One morning I received a call from Jeremie (Daclin) to ask me if I wanted to film with Cliché and Fred—10 days later I was in Australia. But the true story is that I’ve been around Fred, Jeremie, Al (Boglio) and the whole Cliché crew for a long time.

My brother has been working (photography) with Cliché since day one and I went to high school with Fred. So It’s more a friendship collaboration than stricly business. All the guys working at Cliché are my friends, so I was stoked to work on Bon Appetit.

After that I also filmed for Freedom Fries and for Hello Jojo.

How was working on Clé different from video projects in the past?

With Fred and Jeremie, we really wanted to work with musicians. The idea was to work with different bands and to get them more involved in the process of the video.

What’s your favorite part in Clé and why?

My favorite is the Charles Collet part. I met Andrew, the drummer and the man behind Duracell, 10 years ago. He was playing in a band at that time, I already noticed that he was a super good musician. While filming for Clé, Fred sent me a link of his new project, Duracell—his drums and a machine. I really liked the songs, and I really thought the music could match perfectly with Charles’ way of skating and style. I called Andrew and he was super stoked to do it. I think it’s a really powerful section—the music, the tricks—when he palyed live at the premiere, the crowd went off! I really enjoyed filming the skating and the music. I also liked working with Jesus (Fernandez) and Dani (Lebron). we had great times in the studio with JB, my friend Romain who recorded them, and the crazy spanish flamenco chicos!


What’s your favorite trick you filmed in that part?

I think it’s the 50-50, the last trick of his part. It’s the biggest rail I filmed and there’s a story behind the trick: The rail is in Grenoble, Charles’ hometown, which is a one hour drive from Lyon. Charles wanted to go there for a long time and we organized the mission while Andrew Brophy was in Lyon too. The only thing is that they both left the day before by train to celebrate Charles’ or Brophy’s birthday in Grenoble. They called me in the train at 11 p.m. to tell me to come the next morning—they were pretty drunk already. While driving there, I couldn’t reach any of them on the phone and I started thinking I was driving for nothing! I finally met them two hours later and they both looked like the night was a long one! Charles was still smelling like whiskey. I still don’t know how he managed to skate that rail that day—Brophy filmed the ollie over the white rail and the stairs the same day.

How was the music created for that part?

I spent a lot of time with Andrew to choose a song that fit with Charles’ part. I showed him the footy and after a few tries, we decided to shoot with the song called Turrican. It’s a live recording and a one-shoot take. Andrew is a very good drummer.

Junior. Photo: Chassignole

Junior. Photo: Chassignole