Daniel Harold Sturt

He’s somehow able to capture the intensity of the best, most dangerous moments of skateboarding with an eerie sense of imminent trauma. Sturt’s photos stem from his unusual character in the same way a skater’s style leaks their essence. His powerful yet morbid presence somehow fuels his photography. Sturt’s influence and distinctive style is easily seen in the work of many others, ranging from individual shots to entire ad campaigns of the largest corporations in skateboarding.

I first met Daniel when Plan B “arranged” for me to film with him about a decade ago. Stories abounded of this brash, wild-eyed brute and his antics: walking off in the middle of shoots, mind games, and sheer intimidation—all atop his reputation of being the best. I had an outright fear of him. My first day substantiated his “eccentricity” as he squared off with clenched fists, yelling, “I’m the nicest guy you’ll ever meet!” Harry Sturt is a piece of work. Yet that year, a friendship was forged that will last my lifetime.

“A real friend will never stab you in the back—only in the front.” Daniel told me that when we first met, and I have never known anyone, friend or enemy, more ready and willing to do it than he is. Daniel has become one of the most genuine, faithful, closest friends I have. “I’ll be speaking at your funeral,” was his heartfelt acknowledgment of that bond. It may strike you as strange that this man is a Christian. Yet Daniel has heartened my personal faith, probably more than anyone. You may rightly ask what kind of Christian he is. All I can say is that he is a very unusual one, and the world is a safer place because of it, considering the alternative. God works in mysterious ways, and there’s no greater testament of that than Daniel Harold Sturt.—Rodney Mullen

Tony Hawk: Burning In. Page 16

This picture was from the first time Tony did the loop for an ad. He really took some heavy hits. I wanted to show how tough Tony is. Recently he was filming some TV show over at Bob’s, and they were skating with monkeys. He dropped in on the loop, probably distracted by some of the shenanigans going on, and slammed. He broke his pelvis, cracked his skull by his eye, and was knocked unconscious. He could have died. I thought he’d be out a long, long time.

Just a couple months after Tony slammed, Danny Way started letting people ride his mega-ramp. Tony was already flying across that giant gap and doing twelve-foot high tricks on the huge quarterpipe at the end. I can’t think of anyone who would start pushing himself that hard, that soon after such extensive injuries. He’s truly one of the greatest skaters ever. Tony has been thrust into a level of fame that few can even fathom, yet he remains the same humble guy he’s always been.

When I go to the skatepark, I find the kid with the worst board. Nine times out of ten, he’s just beginning. I can’t help myself. I poke fun at his rotten rig throughout the entire session. Then, just when I’m about to leave, I pass him a brand-new Tony Hawk complete setup—courtesy of The Man himself. Tony stokes a lot of kids out, plus they think I’m a nice guy, even after I ruin their whole session.

Geoff Rowley: Another Day At The Office. Page 17

Although Geoff may not always be a gentleman, he has great manners. It’s proof he was raised by good parents. He’s from a close-knit family. His parents live in England, though, so he only gets to see them once a year. I’ve noticed that whenever his family comes out, Geoff gets ready for their visit by getting all his work done so that he’ll be able to spend all his time with them. Since his job is pro street skater, he’s usually wrecked by the time they show up. Mr. and Mrs. Rowley have never seen him ride his skateboard … ever! I included this pictu so his parents can now know the truth about the nastiness he’s been involved with. I’m hoping they’ll get mad, ground him, or make him quit. You can’t do this forever.

Amelia Sturt: Mom. Page 18.

This is my mom about twenty seconds from getting thrown over the falls, nearly drowning. I wanted to show my mom what surf photography was all about, so I chose a double-overhead day. A little payback for dropping me off at the orphanage, bags packed, when I was a kid—a true story. I wish I had a picture of my dad almost drowning, too. Seriously, I love my folks. You couldn’t ask for better parents. I have a lot of respect for them.

Jeremy Wray: Excuse Me, You Lost Something. Page 19

I once heard Ed Templeton describe Jeremy Wray as “a thoroughbred,” as far as athletes are concerned. He could’ve ruled at basically any sport he wanted. We’re fortunate he chose skateboarding. Jeremy did as many amazing things off the camera as he did in front of it. You had to be around him to realize how truly amazing he was. I saw it firsthand—he’s one of the gnarliest, most gifted streetskaters I’ve ever seen.

This picture is from a photo shoot where he jumped between two water towers by his house in La Habra. Both towers were cylinder-shaped, so he had to take off and land at exactly the right point, which was the narrowest distance between the two—just over sixteen feet. They were the same height—making it a flat-to-flat ollie.

I felt more scared than Jeremy did. I had my cell phone dialed to 911 and my finger poised on the send button. I’m so thankful that God answered my prayers, allowing that crazy kid to get across there without getting injured. As soon as I finished putting my camera away, the police showed up. I made a run for it into a huge storm sewer pipe and got lost for 45 minutes because it was pitch black. The only light I had was on my G-Shock watch. It was horrifying! It was like a scene from Indiana Jones. I think every spider in La Habra lived in that storm sewer—and I was covered with them. By the time I found my way out, everyone had gone. I still have post-traumatic stress from that little adventure.

Matt Hensley: Young Matt Hensley. Page 20

Matt Hensley has been a friend of mine forever. I’ve skated with him since he was a little kid. And I actually used to make his H-Street boards when I worked at a woodshop in San Diego. Now I make skateboards for his son.

Matt taught me a lot about fame. He never wanted any part of it, yet he became one of the most well-known skaters since Tony Alva. One of the most important things I learned from him was that a fan might’ve heard about you his whole life, then only gets to meet you for a few minutes. He could bump into you at a moment when you’re in a bad mood and just by being uptight or coming across as a jerk, you could totally wreck this person’s life. I’ve heard that the average person has an effect on about 10,000 people during his lifetime. I think it’s a good idea when you stoke out 10,000 as opposed to bumming out that many people.

Matt was a cool kid with a personality like Robert DeNiro, literally. He always had a smoke half hanging off his lip whenever he talked to you. I think he was smoking in half the pictures I shot of him. I always try to use them, but always get shut down. Matt never wanted any pictures published of him smoking because he knew how influential his image was to a whole generation of kids. Matt ended up quitting smoking after his mom died of cancer. He’s a good man.

He’s also a neurotic man. Matt used to have to tour so much that he developed an extreme fear of flying. He’d actually rent or buy cars to get to demos or go on tour because he couldn’t stand airplanes. When we took that famous picture of him riding on that huge, concrete cowboy hat in Seattle, I had originally come to his house with airplane tickets and told him we were leaving that day. He felt so bad that he couldn’t get on the airplane, that he went down the street and rented a convertible Mustang and said we were driving before I had a chance to say anything. We drove nonstop from San Diego to Seattle, got out of the car, and took the picture. A cop was standing right next to me. I didn’t even notice him, and he sent us home. We drove straight back nonstop, and it still took three days.

He tried as hard as he could to overcome his fear of flying. He thought going skydiving would cure him. I used to skydive all the time. In one month, he came to the airport with me twenty times in a row. Each time he was convinced he was going to do it. And each time, he would back out, sometimes at the last minute while he was in the airplane. He never did jump. But with all the touring that he does now with his band, Flogging Molly, I think he’s gotten better.

Bob Burnquist: Burnquist About To Find Out The Main Difference Between Surfing And Skateboarding. Page 21

Bob Burnquist is an interesting character. He’s super smart. He’s actually a pilot. A lot of times when he goes to demos or contests, he rents a plane and flies there to get flight time. Bob has a really good attitude toward skateboarding. He likes to mess around when he skates and isn’t always taking it seriously. I think that’s half the reason he’s so successful. I doubt he’s ever looked at what he does as a job—he just loves what he’s doing.

I love taking pictures of Bob. He’s worth millions of dollars, yet he’s always down for anything. He never takes it personally when he gets rocked at a photo shoot, even when it’s my sketchy idea that’s responsible for it. He’ll ride any kind of rolling contraption on every terrain possible. Once he rolled into his vert ramp on a 24-inch inline skateboard. It looked like an inline skate with the shoe torn off.

I really like Bob’s family. They’ve taken me in as a family member, so I think I’m Brazilian now. Here’s the hottest story: Bob went to try the Baldy loop, which ended with him injuring his legs, and he had to have surgery. I went over to his ramp and did the loop that day. So when his dad went in to see Bob after his surgery, the first thing he said to Bob when he came off the anesthesia was, “Daniel Harold Sturt did the loop.” And Bob was totally stoked. That makes me laugh to think that one of the greatest skateboarders who ever lived, who had just tried the gnarliest thing ever, would be more stoked that a sketchy old man did the loop out in his yard than what he himself had just done. Or that his father would be more excited about me than his history-making son. They’re such great people.

After word got around, I even got a phone call from Tony Hawk, who was as amazed as I. If you’ve ever seen me ride, you would be, too. I’m not good at skateboarding. He asked me how on Earth I did it, and I really couldn’t tell him how I did it. I’m just convinced that God allowed me to make it. I think God uses things like doing the loop to get people’s attention. Then it gives me an opportunity to tell others about Christ, that he died for our sins and if we ask him to be our savior, we will have eternal life. I know I’m not going to convince anyone about God no matter what stunt I do—ultimately it’s between them and God. But I am called to be the messenger.

Danny Way: Wrong Way. Page 22

Danny Way single-handedly feminized street skating in one move by building that crazy handrail. That’s something I thought could never happen. Don’t get me wrong. I love street skating as much as anybody, but you can ask any top street pro what they tiding on that huge, concrete cowboy hat in Seattle, I had originally come to his house with airplane tickets and told him we were leaving that day. He felt so bad that he couldn’t get on the airplane, that he went down the street and rented a convertible Mustang and said we were driving before I had a chance to say anything. We drove nonstop from San Diego to Seattle, got out of the car, and took the picture. A cop was standing right next to me. I didn’t even notice him, and he sent us home. We drove straight back nonstop, and it still took three days.

He tried as hard as he could to overcome his fear of flying. He thought going skydiving would cure him. I used to skydive all the time. In one month, he came to the airport with me twenty times in a row. Each time he was convinced he was going to do it. And each time, he would back out, sometimes at the last minute while he was in the airplane. He never did jump. But with all the touring that he does now with his band, Flogging Molly, I think he’s gotten better.

Bob Burnquist: Burnquist About To Find Out The Main Difference Between Surfing And Skateboarding. Page 21

Bob Burnquist is an interesting character. He’s super smart. He’s actually a pilot. A lot of times when he goes to demos or contests, he rents a plane and flies there to get flight time. Bob has a really good attitude toward skateboarding. He likes to mess around when he skates and isn’t always taking it seriously. I think that’s half the reason he’s so successful. I doubt he’s ever looked at what he does as a job—he just loves what he’s doing.

I love taking pictures of Bob. He’s worth millions of dollars, yet he’s always down for anything. He never takes it personally when he gets rocked at a photo shoot, even when it’s my sketchy idea that’s responsible for it. He’ll ride any kind of rolling contraption on every terrain possible. Once he rolled into his vert ramp on a 24-inch inline skateboard. It looked like an inline skate with the shoe torn off.

I really like Bob’s family. They’ve taken me in as a family member, so I think I’m Brazilian now. Here’s the hottest story: Bob went to try the Baldy loop, which ended with him injuring his legs, and he had to have surgery. I went over to his ramp and did the loop that day. So when his dad went in to see Bob after his surgery, the first thing he said to Bob when he came off the anesthesia was, “Daniel Harold Sturt did the loop.” And Bob was totally stoked. That makes me laugh to think that one of the greatest skateboarders who ever lived, who had just tried the gnarliest thing ever, would be more stoked that a sketchy old man did the loop out in his yard than what he himself had just done. Or that his father would be more excited about me than his history-making son. They’re such great people.

After word got around, I even got a phone call from Tony Hawk, who was as amazed as I. If you’ve ever seen me ride, you would be, too. I’m not good at skateboarding. He asked me how on Earth I did it, and I really couldn’t tell him how I did it. I’m just convinced that God allowed me to make it. I think God uses things like doing the loop to get people’s attention. Then it gives me an opportunity to tell others about Christ, that he died for our sins and if we ask him to be our savior, we will have eternal life. I know I’m not going to convince anyone about God no matter what stunt I do—ultimately it’s between them and God. But I am called to be the messenger.

Danny Way: Wrong Way. Page 22

Danny Way single-handedly feminized street skating in one move by building that crazy handrail. That’s something I thought could never happen. Don’t get me wrong. I love street skating as much as anybody, but you can ask any top street pro what they think about him and that rail, and most will admit they should probably be wearing a pink dress right now.

Danny invited me over to his mega-ramp when he started letting all the other top vert pros ride it, and I could see they were all scared to death of it—as they should’ve been. It’s a really sketchy place over there: no mobile-phone service, no first aid, no neighbors for miles. I’m convinced someone will be maimed or killed on that structure.

I saw a picture of Danny trying to pry the nose of his board off the end of the rail. The deck stuck out like an arrow. I commented that the rail must be really sharp and suggested that he file it blunt before he gets hurt. Danny’s response was a very calculated one: “You have to be going 40 miles per hour just to make it to the landing ramp. At speeds like that, if you fall into that rail—blunt, padded, or not—it will go right through you. A textbook example of the term impaled.”

Jamie Thomas: Picket Fence. Page 23

Jamie Thomas is one of a kind. He always comes across in a matter-of-fact way—he doesn’t mince words. You know where you stand with people like that. His personality reminds me of old Evel Knievel interviews from back in the day. He is a very smart and motivated person, and his success off the skateboard is proof. He’s straight-edge, and he’s insanely disciplined—even with what he eats. Once he had a major knee surgery, and afterward in recovery he didn’t like the way the pain killers affected his thinking, so he never took any of the prescriptions. He’s one tough dude. I always joked with him that every street skater rides with a stick of dynamite in their pocket, and that eventually he was going to fall on it. Jamie would call every so often, leaving these hot messages like, “Hey, ya know that dynamite you’re always talking about? Well, I fell on it, and it blew my knee apart,” or, “It blew one of my teeth off.” He has a great sense of humor. One of the biggest regrets I have, as far as filming goes, is that I never got to film his more dangerous stunts.

Jamie Thomas sees the big picture and knows that he will not be able to skate forever. He spends a lot of time working on his companies and with his riders’ careers. His employees that I’ve spoken to are stoked working with him, not just because of his fame, but for his integrity and straightforwardness. I think he’s one of the best role models in skateboarding because he knows he’s a sinner and accepted God’s free gift of salvation. He’s made plans to live forever.

Bruno Pasos: First Hit. Page 24

Bruno is one of my favorite skaters. He rides better than most pros, but I don’t even think he’s sponsored—and I doubt he cares. The day before he got there, everybody else had gotten used to jumping the gap without the rail in the way. Unfortunately for poor Bruno, he had to deal with the crazy rail the first try.

Daniel Sturt: Oververt, And Asking For It. Page 25

I like this picture because I look like I’m in shape—although minutes later I didn’t look or feel it. I also like it because my wife took it. She actually hates photography, and this day pretty much sealed that. A few runs after she took this shot, I slammed on a different part of the ramp right next to her. She heard my rib bones snapping and that terrible noise you make when you can’t breathe. Now she knows exactly what it’s like when I tell her stories about top pros slamming in front of me. It’s amazing how fragile life is—here today, gone minutes later today.

Arto Saari: Going South. Page 26

Let me tell you about this Arto picture. I feel really blessed to get to work with some of the best skateboarders in the world at the time in their lives when they are becoming legends. I can’t believe the dangerous crap they get away with. The day I took this picture of Arto, he was in a grumpy mood, but he managed to loosen up by doing the complete history of skateboarding on that rail before deciding he was ready to film. But by the time he finished, he needed a new deck, so we all called it quits. Back at the van, he found a new board, set it up, and decided he wanted to go back to film.

We all went back to the rail, and I set my camera down next to a wall that partially blocked my view of the bottom of the rail. I watched Arto ollie up to do a Smith grind directly over the back. He locked at the top of the rail and fell out of sight, striking his forehead on the rail, then the ground. He literally landed in a heap—super scary because he was unconscious and vomiting, signs of a severe concussion.. His head was in a position where he might have choked on his vomit. I was afraid to touch him because I thought his spine was broken, and trying to move him could cause paralysis. His chest lay flat on the ground and so did his butt—his body was twisted 180 degrees.

From that point on, I vowed never to shoot these guys unless I have a cell phone with me, ready to call 911. As the firemen put him on the stretcher, he came to, and they slowly straightened out his back. They got him to the hospital safely. His spine was fine, but he had to spend the night in intensive care to make sure his brain didn’t swell. That scared me, because if it did, they’d have to drill a hole in his skull to relieve the pressure. Injuries like that can lead to all sorts of brain damage, which could mean anything from not being able to speak, to paralysis or death.

Epilogue

All of my life I’ve been preoccupied with death. Other people’s deaths, I mean, especially being around so many dangerous activities. And I never want anyone to die because of my lack of first-aid experience. That may have something to do with why I went to paramedic school—I thought it could come in handy when I shot BASE jumping. But I found out firsthand, there’s usually not much you can do if a parachute doesn’t open, and sometimes it’s like that with any accident. That forced me to take a hard look at my own mortality. And this keeps me focused on my faith.

I also studied forensic photography. One day, I’m afraid, I may be doing forensic photos by chance at the bottom of a handrail. These guys are the top of the skateboard world, and they get wrecked. The consequences are real—it’s the reality they face. I see their careers come and go at a quickening pace. It’s harsh—it’s the boulevard of broken dreams. A lot of these guys are aware of the consequences, but they do it anyway.

Most kids don’t have any of the medical resources pros have, yet still skate dangerous stuff. Whether you get it from slamming on a handrail or not, it’s gonna happen to all of us. Death is always a loss, but the greatest tragedy is when you’re not in a right relationship with God and die without Christ. This is one man’s humble opinion. Sorry to have to stab you in the front with it … friends.

k about him and that rail, and most will admit they should probably be wearing a pink dress right now.

Danny invited me over to his mega-ramp when he started letting all the other top vert pros ride it, and I could see they were all scared to death of it—as they should’ve been. It’s a really sketchy place over there: no mobile-phone service, no first aid, no neighbors for miles. I’m convinced someone will be maimed or killed on that structure.

I saw a picture of Danny trying to pry the nose of his board off the end of the rail. The deck stuck out like an arrow. I commented that the rail must be really sharp and suggested that he file it blunt before he gets hurt. Danny’s response was a very calculated one: “You have to be going 40 miles per hour just to make it to the landing ramp. At speeds like that, if you fall into that rail—blunt, padded, or not—it will go right through you. A textbook example of the term impaled.”

Jamie Thomas: Picket Fence. Page 23

Jamie Thomas is one of a kind. He always comes across in a matter-of-fact way—he doesn’t mince words. You know where you stand with people like that. His personality reminds me of old Evel Knievel interviews from back in the day. He is a very smart and motivated person, and his success off the skateboard is proof. He’s straight-edge, and he’s insanely disciplined—even with what he eats. Once he had a major knee surgery, and afterward in recovery he didn’t like the way the pain killers affected his thinking, so he never took any of the prescriptions. He’s one tough dude. I always joked with him that every street skater rides with a stick of dynamite in their pocket, and that eventually he was going to fall on it. Jamie would call every so often, leaving these hot messages like, “Hey, ya know that dynamite you’re always talking about? Well, I fell on it, and it blew my knee apart,” or, “It blew one of my teeth off.” He has a great sense of humor. One of the biggest regrets I have, as far as filming goes, is that I never got to film his more dangerous stunts.

Jamie Thomas sees the big picture and knows that he will not be able to skate forever. He spends a lot of time working on his companies and with his riders’ careers. His employees that I’ve spoken to are stoked working with him, not just because of his fame, but for his integrity and straightforwardness. I think he’s one of the best role models in skateboarding because he knows he’s a sinner and accepted God’s free gift of salvation. He’s made plans to live forever.

Bruno Pasos: First Hit. Page 24

Bruno is one of my favorite skaters. He rides better than most pros, but I don’t even think he’s sponsored—and I doubt he cares. The day before he got there, everybody else had gotten used to jumping the gap without the rail in the way. Unfortunately for poor Bruno, he had to deal with the crazy rail the first try.

Daniel Sturt: Oververt, And Asking For It. Page 25

I like this picture because I look like I’m in shape—although minutes later I didn’t look or feel it. I also like it because my wife took it. She actually hates photography, and this day pretty much sealed that. A few runs after she took this shot, I slammed on a different part of the ramp right next to her. She heard my rib bones snapping and that terrible noise you make when you can’t breathe. Now she knows exactly what it’s like when I tell her stories about top pros slamming in front of me. It’s amazing how fragile life is—here today, gone minutes later today.

Arto Saari: Going South. Page 26

Let me tell you about this Arto picture. I feel really blessed to get to work with some of the best skateboarders in the world at the time in their lives when they are becoming legends. I can’t believe the dangerous crap they get away with. The day I took this picture of Arto, he was in a grumpy mood, but he managed to loosen up by doing the complete history of skateboarding on that rail before deciding he was ready to film. But by the time he finished, he needed a new deck, so we all called it quits. Back at the van, he found a new board, set it up, and decided he wanted to go back to film.

We all went back to the rail, and I set my camera down next to a wall that partially blocked my view of the bottom of the rail. I watched Arto ollie up to do a Smith grind directly over the back. He locked at the top of the rail and fell out of sight, striking his forehead on the rail, then the ground. He literally landed in a heap—super scary because he was unconscious and vomiting, signs of a severe concussion. His head was in a position where he might have choked on his vomit. I was afraid to touch him because I thought his spine was broken, and trying to move him could cause paralysis. His chest lay flat on the ground and so did his butt—his body was twisted 180 degrees.

From that point on, I vowed never to shoot these guys unless I have a cell phone with me, ready to call 911. As the firemen put him on the stretcher, he came to, and they slowly straightened out his back. They got him to the hospital safely. His spine was fine, but he had to spend the night in intensive care to make sure his brain didn’t swell. That scared me, because if it did, they’d have to drill a hole in his skull to relieve the pressure. Injuries like that can lead to all sorts of brain damage, which could mean anything from not being able to speak, to paralysis or death.

Epilogue

All of my life I’ve been preoccupied with death. Other people’s deaths, I mean, especially being around so many dangerous activities. And I never want anyone to die because of my lack of first-aid experience. That may have something to do with why I went to paramedic school—I thought it could come in handy when I shot BASE jumping. But I found out firsthand, there’s usually not much you can do if a parachute doesn’t open, and sometimes it’s like that with any accident. That forced me to take a hard look at my own mortality. And this keeps me focused on my faith.

I also studied forensic photography. One day, I’m afraid, I may be doing forensic photos by chance at the bottom of a handrail. These guys are the top of the skateboard world, and they get wrecked. The consequences are real—it’s the reality they face. I see their careers come and go at a quickening pace. It’s harsh—it’s the boulevard of broken dreams. A lot of these guys are aware of the consequences, but they do it anyway.

Most kids don’t have any of the medical resources pros have, yet still skate dangerous stuff. Whether you get it from slamming on a handrail or not, it’s gonna happen to all of us. Death is always a loss, but the greatest tragedy is when you’re not in a right relationship with God and die without Christ. This is one man’s humble opinion. Sorry to have to stab you in the front with it … friends.

n’t believe the dangerous crap they get away with. The day I took this picture of Arto, he was in a grumpy mood, but he managed to loosen up by doing the complete history of skateboarding on that rail before deciding he was ready to film. But by the time he finished, he needed a new deck, so we all called it quits. Back at the van, he found a new board, set it up, and decided he wanted to go back to film.

We all went back to the rail, and I set my camera down next to a wall that partially blocked my view of the bottom of the rail. I watched Arto ollie up to do a Smith grind directly over the back. He locked at the top of the rail and fell out of sight, striking his forehead on the rail, then the ground. He literally landed in a heap—super scary because he was unconscious and vomiting, signs of a severe concussion. His head was in a position where he might have choked on his vomit. I was afraid to touch him because I thought his spine was broken, and trying to move him could cause paralysis. His chest lay flat on the ground and so did his butt—his body was twisted 180 degrees.

From that point on, I vowed never to shoot these guys unless I have a cell phone with me, ready to call 911. As the firemen put him on the stretcher, he came to, and they slowly straightened out his back. They got him to the hospital safely. His spine was fine, but he had to spend the night in intensive care to make sure his brain didn’t swell. That scared me, because if it did, they’d have to drill a hole in his skull to relieve the pressure. Injuries like that can lead to all sorts of brain damage, which could mean anything from not being able to speak, to paralysis or death.

Epilogue

All of my life I’ve been preoccupied with death. Other people’s deaths, I mean, especially being around so many dangerous activities. And I never want anyone to die because of my lack of first-aid experience. That may have something to do with why I went to paramedic school—I thought it could come in handy when I shot BASE jumping. But I found out firsthand, there’s usually not much you can do if a parachute doesn’t open, and sometimes it’s like that with any accident. That forced me to take a hard look at my own mortality. And this keeps me focused on my faith.

I also studied forensic photography. One day, I’m afraid, I may be doing forensic photos by chance at the bottom of a handrail. These guys are the top of the skateboard world, and they get wrecked. The consequences are real—it’s the reality they face. I see their careers come and go at a quickening pace. It’s harsh—it’s the boulevard of broken dreams. A lot of these guys are aware of the consequences, but they do it anyway.

Most kids don’t have any of the medical resources pros have, yet still skate dangerous stuff. Whether you get it from slamming on a handrail or not, it’s gonna happen to all of us. Death is always a loss, but the greatest tragedy is when you’re not in a right relationship with God and die without Christ. This is one man’s humble opinion. Sorry to have to stab you in the front with it … friends.