I Want You Back


Guy Mariano Pro Spotlight
Words by Mackenzie Eisenhour

Life is invariably a continuous series of ups and downs. For some of us, a bad day is when our favorite sports team loses. For others, a bad day is when there’s no food on the table. Whatever the math of your pluses and minuses, very few of us are treated to a smooth ride all the way home. Guy Mariano is an individual who has seen his share of turnarounds over the years. He’s a humble man, has grown wise with age, and stands stern with experience. He also happens to be pegged by many as one of the most gifted people ever to set foot on a skateboard-ever. The following is a transcription of his first-ever telephone interview.

You seem to strive on never doing the same thing twice on a skateboard. Is that a motivator for you?
I definitely like to try new things. I do have my standby tricks that I end up doing over and over, but there are certain sessions where I absolutely want to try something for as long as it takes just to make a trick that’s new and exciting to me. I guess it has to do with just wanting to the best possible job you can with everything you do.

How did you guys-you meaning Rudy Johnson, Gabriel Rodriguez, Paulo Diaz, and yourself-feel under the direction of Stacy Peralta in Ban This (1989)?
I’m still psyched on it. I don’t think I’d be where I’m at today if I hadn’t worked with Stacy back then. A lot of people got to know me through that video. I mean, that was my first real exposure. It was actually funny because we did that whole part a year before that video came out, and by the time the video was getting closer to being done, we all wanted to re-film and stuff because we had learned so many new tricks. I remember Stacy turning us down and explaining that you couldn’t have the amateurs look better than the professionals, so we were sticking with what we already had. That was pretty funny. Paulo and Gabriel were skating so good at that time that I feel like that video didn’t really do us justice, but we didn’t really trip too hard on it at the time. Stacy made it sound real straightforward, so we just kind of accepted it.

How did Steve Rocco or Mark Gonzales lure you away from the Bones Brigade?
Rudy and I were skating a ton with Mark at that point. I don’t think he had any ulterior motives or anything, but we were just hanging out and we were living at Mark’s house at the time. We were already into all the World Industries product and vibe, and Stacy had left Powell at that point, so we weren’t really talking to anyone over there. Then eventually Mark just told us he was going to start his own thing. I remember one night I hooked up with Rudy and he was just like, “Hey, I skate for Blind now. I think you should do it too.” I was just kind of like, “All right. I guess I am too then.” So I guess if I had to say, Rudy recruited me (laughs).

Did you ever imagine that sixteen years later, people would still be talking about this when you filmed for Video Days (1991)?
No. I didn’t think it was going to be anything crazy. One thing I will say about Video Days is that Jason Lee’s part was super amazing and everything, but seeing him in person back then, he was just so much better than even that part shows. He was never the type of guy to always bring a filmer. He’d go out late night just to skate, and I just saw that dude do so much amazing stuff and not all of it made it into that video.

What was the Powell “Supreme” red shirt about in Video Days? I’ve heard some far-fetched conspiracy theories.
Man, I just liked the shirt. It’s pretty funny that people came up with all these reasons for it. But back then, you could just wear a shirt and not have ten team managers call you up. I just liked it-period. It was a good shirt. There were no hard feelings for us. I mean, maybe there was higher up, but we were pretty young and weren’t beefing over the industry or anything.

What happened with the ilslide down the Beneficial rail at the end of your part?
What happened was that I thought I was gonna bail, started sliding out, tried to kick the board away, and somehow it landed under my feet. Then I came up and was trying to say, “Oh, I was gonna jump off,” but was still a little scared or whatever and ended up stuttering-“Oh, I didn’t, I didn’t, I didn’t… ” (laughs).

How did you feel about skating to The Jackson Five?
That was Mark’s idea. I remember him telling me, “I want you to skate to Michael Jackson.” I was like, “What?” But it worked out good. I mean, Mark is just ahead of his time with everything, and picking music for a video was no different because right after that, every video had the oldies soundtrack. Mark and Spike (Jonze) are just ahead of their time. Whatever they do, it ends up being done by everyone else later.

What was the first switch tre you ever landed? What was the thought process behind it?
I gotta say, it was probably Rodney (Mullen) who did them first. We used to do the Blind tours with the World guys, and I’m almost 100-percent sure Rodney did it first. At the same time, I was skating tons of flatground with Henry Sanchez-he was living at my mom’s house at the time and we had this tiny bump out front where the sidewalk kind of came up. We used to clock a lot of hours trying to learn tricks off that thing. Henry probably did most of everything first. Then the ones he didn’t do or chose not to do too often, I’d kind of work those. But the switch tre, I’m gonna have to give it up to Rodney Mullen.

What are your best memories from the World park days?
Probably Tim Gavin and Matt Schnurr raising hell. There were all kinds of crazy antics going on in there-stealing boards from the product closet, pretty much anything to piss off Rodney and Steve Rocco (laughs). I remember one time we were gonna go to S.F. and Rodney asked Schnurr if he wanted to go, and he was like, “Sure.” So Rodney bought him a one-way ticket. At that time Schnurr rode for Tim Gavin (laughs). He lived at my mom’s house too at one point, and I just remember he always had more product and more money than me. He was a hustler.

Where is that footage, like the tailslide kickflip out over the double-sided ledge they ran a sequence of in the Blind ad announcing not to hold your breath for the full-length Blind video?
Basically what happened was that we had laid the whole video out including the Tim And Henry’s (1992) footage-like choosing what we thought were the best parts or whatever, and Mike Ternasky came through to check it out and felt that since Tim and Henry had the most stuff, we should just give them full parts and have like two or three tricks for everybody else. Ternasky was a guy that was held in extremely high regard in terms of skate videos, so we listened to what he had to say. So the rest of the footage just kind of got left by the wayside.

Is Socrates still sitting on a full part of yours?
I doubt it. I don’t know. I know there was footage of everyone-Brian Lotti, Rudy, and myself. I’m pretty sure Soc’s actually making a video right now, like a 90s retrospective kind of thing, so maybe it’ll finally come out in there.

Did you purposely have nothing but switch tricks in the Virtual Reality (1993) Blind friends section?
No. I think it was just the hot thing at the time and I was probably going off that. Switch is funny sometimes. Like certain tricks you can’t do regular but can do switch-are they really switch? Like, I can’t do tre flips, so my switch tre flip is basically my tre flip.

Who first approached you about Girl?
Rick Howard. I remember we were skating the Macy’s in West Hollywood and he told me he was gonna start it. I thought it was a little scary at first. With Blind, I was just a kid, so I never really thought about it, but with Rick, I think I was getting a little bit older and it seemed liked everything was so solid under World that it seemed a little risky. It was like, “Can he do this? Can he run a company and pull this off?” I think that’s why Henry Sanchez backed out. He was supposed to be down with it and ended up sticking with Blind. Obviously, looking back it was a great decision and a great opportunity for me, but in the beginning, it was pretty rough. I remember Rick and Megan (Baltimore) packing boxes, and we were sharing a warehouse with X-Large, the clothing company. But they pulled it off in the end, and it worked out really good.

Was Kareem Campbell approached?
I think Kareem was approached for Chocolate, but he and Rick just didn’t see eye-to-eye on certain things. Plus, it was a huge opportunity for Kareem because it gave him more leeway to do all the projects he ended up doing at World like Menace and Axion.

After Video Days and without a full part for five years, did you really make an effort to put one out for Mouse (1996), or did it just sort of happen?
Basically at the time, I wasn’t really hanging out with the Girl guys that much. I ended up hanging out a bunch with the Menace guys, who were filming too at the time, and Socrates was around, and I already had some footage built up. After Goldfish (1993) came out, and the video was amazing, I really felt like I had missed out on an opportunity with that, and I didn’t want it to happen again for Mouse. So I made sure it didn’t.

If you would have stayed on Blind…
(Interrupts) Wait. I really want to come back to that because it’s really important to me. Some people actually think that that’s my plan or that’s my M.O., you know what I mean? Like, “Yeah, you like to lay low for years, then come back and put out a part and then lay low for another couple years.” That is not the case. This is just the way life has worked out for me. It’s not some plan or something.

What is the longest period of time you’ve spent off a skateboard?
This last time. It was probably over five years. I mean, I always had a board and would use it for transportation or skate the occasional mini ramp, but yeah, that was the longest. I had a short fantasy in between that I was gonna skate again and went and shot photos with Atiba (Jefferson) for a week. But really, I was off it. It sucks. The worst thing about being a skateboarder is just looking back and thinking like, “F-k, I missed out on so many things by not skating.” Not just material things, like, “Oh, I could’ve had a car like Koston’s or a house like Rick’s.” But more just that I missed out on being a part of skateboarding. I robbed myself of the opportunities to have fun on a skateboard.

What kept you from skating?
I think I just had a lot of distractions. I was my biggest distraction, kind of just being lazy and being caught up in, “Oh, I’ll just do it tomorrow. I’ll just party and kick back for now.” That lifestyle continued until I was a slave to it. Skateboarding is a hard sport, man. Especially nowadays, people ain’t f-kin’ around (laughs). I think you could pull off that whole “being a pile and still jumping on a skateboard once in a while” shtick for maybe a little while. But eventually skateboarding starts to notice. The kids notice right away. Then the industry starts to notice and all of a sudden you’re in this sad situation where you got to do it all for the wrong reasons.

What would you tell someone interested in drugs?
When it’s not fun anymore, give it a break. Everybody’s different. Maybe some people need to experience it themselves. Everybody’s wired differently, and there are some people who can do whatever they want and it won’t affect them. But when you start getting affected mentally, physically, and financially, you might just want to check up on what you’re doing.

Did drugs start to affect you in those ways?
Well, just hanging out with lowlifes is a part you kind of wake up to. And I don’t really want to talk about my finances.

What age did you first stet it seemed a little risky. It was like, “Can he do this? Can he run a company and pull this off?” I think that’s why Henry Sanchez backed out. He was supposed to be down with it and ended up sticking with Blind. Obviously, looking back it was a great decision and a great opportunity for me, but in the beginning, it was pretty rough. I remember Rick and Megan (Baltimore) packing boxes, and we were sharing a warehouse with X-Large, the clothing company. But they pulled it off in the end, and it worked out really good.

Was Kareem Campbell approached?
I think Kareem was approached for Chocolate, but he and Rick just didn’t see eye-to-eye on certain things. Plus, it was a huge opportunity for Kareem because it gave him more leeway to do all the projects he ended up doing at World like Menace and Axion.

After Video Days and without a full part for five years, did you really make an effort to put one out for Mouse (1996), or did it just sort of happen?
Basically at the time, I wasn’t really hanging out with the Girl guys that much. I ended up hanging out a bunch with the Menace guys, who were filming too at the time, and Socrates was around, and I already had some footage built up. After Goldfish (1993) came out, and the video was amazing, I really felt like I had missed out on an opportunity with that, and I didn’t want it to happen again for Mouse. So I made sure it didn’t.

If you would have stayed on Blind…
(Interrupts) Wait. I really want to come back to that because it’s really important to me. Some people actually think that that’s my plan or that’s my M.O., you know what I mean? Like, “Yeah, you like to lay low for years, then come back and put out a part and then lay low for another couple years.” That is not the case. This is just the way life has worked out for me. It’s not some plan or something.

What is the longest period of time you’ve spent off a skateboard?
This last time. It was probably over five years. I mean, I always had a board and would use it for transportation or skate the occasional mini ramp, but yeah, that was the longest. I had a short fantasy in between that I was gonna skate again and went and shot photos with Atiba (Jefferson) for a week. But really, I was off it. It sucks. The worst thing about being a skateboarder is just looking back and thinking like, “F-k, I missed out on so many things by not skating.” Not just material things, like, “Oh, I could’ve had a car like Koston’s or a house like Rick’s.” But more just that I missed out on being a part of skateboarding. I robbed myself of the opportunities to have fun on a skateboard.

What kept you from skating?
I think I just had a lot of distractions. I was my biggest distraction, kind of just being lazy and being caught up in, “Oh, I’ll just do it tomorrow. I’ll just party and kick back for now.” That lifestyle continued until I was a slave to it. Skateboarding is a hard sport, man. Especially nowadays, people ain’t f-kin’ around (laughs). I think you could pull off that whole “being a pile and still jumping on a skateboard once in a while” shtick for maybe a little while. But eventually skateboarding starts to notice. The kids notice right away. Then the industry starts to notice and all of a sudden you’re in this sad situation where you got to do it all for the wrong reasons.

What would you tell someone interested in drugs?
When it’s not fun anymore, give it a break. Everybody’s different. Maybe some people need to experience it themselves. Everybody’s wired differently, and there are some people who can do whatever they want and it won’t affect them. But when you start getting affected mentally, physically, and financially, you might just want to check up on what you’re doing.

Did drugs start to affect you in those ways?
Well, just hanging out with lowlifes is a part you kind of wake up to. And I don’t really want to talk about my finances.

What age did you first step on a skateboard?
I grew up in the San Fernando Valley in a nice suburban area. Everybody on the block had bikes, skateboards, and ramps. My sister had a skateboard before I was born. I was probably seriously five years old when I started. I think the first board I had was like something out of the Dogtown And The Z-Boys video-total plastic banana board. My first actual “setup” setup was from Toys “R” Us and was a Michael Jackson Thriller board (laughs). I skated that thing so late in front of my house one night that I ended up leaving it on the lawn and it got stolen the next morning.

What was the funniest thing about being on SK8 TV?
It was probably the first time I went to see Scream and I saw the actor who hosted the show in the movie. He actually went on to become a movie star-what do you know? But SK8 TV-which was done by Stacy, too-was way ahead of its time. I mean, that’s like what Fuel TV and the X Games are now.

Who did you look up to most as a skateboarder coming up?
Well, when I was coming up it was Gonz and Natas Kaupas. That was just the standard. Before that it was like Tommy Guerrero and the Bones Brigade. I think Future Primitive (1985) was the first Powell video I saw, then Animal Chin (1987).

Were you always attracted to street skating primarily?
Not really. I was into the street skating, but I had a vert ramp near my house and I was into Tony Hawk and stuff like that. I used to try to do it all. I had some dreams to be a vert pro. I still want to do a McTwist. I’ve skated vert off and on. When we had the vert ramp at Girl, just trying to do like five-foot airs seemed insane to me. Lip tricks, like a crooked grind, I just kind of look at as a big bank to bench. But actual airs are a whole different story.

What made Keenan Milton different from others?
What Keenan brought to the table was his clean style and that personality. He was one of those guys who just always wanted to do things better. Like, he would make a trick, and I would be like, “That was perfect.” But he would still be like, “Nah, I want to do it better.” Even with his clothes. He wanted to look good doing his lines. Personality-wise he was just a fun guy to go anywhere with. On trips, he would just meet people left and right because he was so outgoing. He made life a party. The guy would light up any room. I remember him hooking up with people, like in Australia he went out there on a trip, met Dustin Dollin, came home, and ended up going back for two months. He could just connect with people even if they weren’t necessarily exactly the type of people you’d expect.

What makes Girl different?
What separates Girl is just like in life-every company has their own thumbprint you know. And the Girl thumbprint is just one that I think stands out a little from the rest. Rick tries to keep things as family as possible, which can get harder as time goes by because you get skaters that are just sort of holding on and not producing. It’s like any family. You have problems here and there.

How did it feel when they pulled your pro model?
Bad. But I can completely understand why they did that, though. I mean, I wasn’t skating. I wasn’t helping the company. I deserved it. And it sucked, and it sucks for Rick because one day he’s going to have to apply those principles to himself and a lot of people he genuinely cares about. But I was aware that I was not being a constructive part of the company.

Aside from tre flips, are there any other basic tricks you struggle with?
I can’t do a nollie heel for the life of me. It’s funny, though, the thing with me is I’ve done tricks, and then I just don’t do them again for a while. I’m not that dude that’s just practicing the same trick over and over. Like I’ll skate with Mikemo (Capaldi) or whatever and sometimes we get out of the car and he’s like, “You wanna play SKATE?” And I’m just like, “What, are you crazy?” Some days, I’m on it. I surprise myyself with flatground. But other days, I seriously feel like Gator when he’s trying to skate street in that documentary (laughs).

What would you consider your biggest accomplishment in skateboarding?
What I’m happiest about in skating-even though I’ve been in and out of it-is the longevity and to still actually be able to bring new things to the table. I’ve known so many good skateboarders who just aren’t here anymore. They came and they went, and I just feel blessed to still be in it and bringing something to it. So many heads came and went before their time. Anything good I can contribute I consider a big accomplishment.

What was the last contest you entered?
Well, we used to all do them and actually enjoy them back in the day when we were kids. But I really could not picture myself entering a contest today. Like, I went to the last X Games and watching those guys, I was seriously like a fan. They’re like the best of the best. I mean, I’d see Chris Cole out there doing his ender-ender from whatever video in his jams. Paul Rodriguez-I saw him there. I was just like, “Wow.” It was amazing.

What is the weirdest thing Mark Gonzales ever told you?
I can’t really say. The last time I saw him we were in front of Girl and he had a super fat board and then a regular board, and he’ll try to tell you about a trick, like some weird body varial flip trick you can’t even imagine. One thing about Mark, though, is that even back in the day he would say things all the time like, “You know those frontside noseslides? I want to do one that’s like ten feet long.” And I’d be to myself like, “Okay, the dude has definitely lost it now.” And then someone would do it like five years later. Or with noseblunt-slides, I remember him telling me he wanted to try them and I was just kind of like, “Yeah, I don’t know if people are gonna pick up on that.” And again, I’d tell myself, “Ok, this time he’s really lost it.” But nowadays, no matter how far-fetched a trick he comes up with and talks to me about and I decide again that he’s completely lost it, I don’t know anymore. Maybe he’s right (laughs). Maybe whatever he’s talking about is gonna be the next sh-t.

Is it fair to call this whole thing a comeback?
No, man. People can call this whatever they want. But I didn’t set out to make this a comeback. I’m just skating. And it’s hard work. Skateboarding is hard and I’m putting the effort into it that I need to. But I’ve just awoken from a place where I didn’t want to be and I’m just coming back to where I want to be. It’s just my life. And that’s all it can be.


n a skateboard?
I grew up in the San Fernando Valley in a nice suburban area. Everybody on the block had bikes, skateboards, and ramps. My sister had a skateboard before I was born. I was probably seriously five years old when I started. I think the first board I had was like something out of the Dogtown And The Z-Boys video-total plastic banana board. My first actual “setup” setup was from Toys “R” Us and was a Michael Jackson Thriller board (laughs). I skated that thing so late in front of my house one night that I ended up leaving it on the lawn and it got stolen the next morning.

What was the funniest thing about being on SK8 TV?
It was probably the first time I went to see Scream and I saw the actor who hosted the show in the movie. He actually went on to become a movie star-what do you know? But SK8 TV-which was done by Stacy, too-was way ahead of its time. I mean, that’s like what Fuel TV and the X Games are now.

Who did you look up to most as a skateboarder coming up?
Well, when I was coming up it was Gonz and Natas Kaupas. That was just the standard. Before that it was like Tommy Guerrero and the Bones Brigade. I think Future Primitive (1985) was the first Powell video I saw, then Animal Chin (1987).

Were you always attracted to street skating primarily?
Not really. I was into the street skating, but I had a vert ramp near my house and I was into Tony Hawk and stuff like that. I used to try to do it all. I had some dreams to be a vert pro. I still want to do a McTwist. I’ve skated vert off and on. When we had the vert ramp at Girl, just trying to do like five-foot airs seemed insane to me. Lip tricks, like a crooked grind, I just kind of look at as a big bank to bench. But actual airs are a whole different story.

What made Keenan Milton different from others?
What Keenan brought to the table was his clean style and that personality. He was one of those guys who just always wanted to do things better. Like, he would make a trick, and I would be like, “That was perfect.” But he would still be like, “Nah, I want to do it better.” Even with his clothes. He wanted to look good doing his lines. Personality-wise he was just a fun guy to go anywhere with. On trips, he would just meet people left and right because he was so outgoing. He made life a party. The guy would light up any room. I remember him hooking up with people, like in Australia he went out there on a trip, met Dustin Dollin, came home, and ended up going back for two months. He could just connect with people even if they weren’t necessarily exactly the type of people you’d expect.

What makes Girl different?
What separates Girl is just like in life-every company has their own thumbprint you know. And the Girl thumbprint is just one that I think stands out a little from the rest. Rick tries to keep things as family as possible, which can get harder as time goes by because you get skaters that are just sort of holding on and not producing. It’s like any family. You have problems here and there.

How did it feel when they pulled your pro model?
Bad. But I can completely understand why they did that, though. I mean, I wasn’t skating. I wasn’t helping the company. I deserved it. And it sucked, and it sucks for Rick because one day he’s going to have to apply those principles to himself and a lot of people he genuinely cares about. But I was aware that I was not being a constructive part of the company.

Aside from tre flips, are there any other basic tricks you struggle with?
I can’t do a nollie heel for the life of me. It’s funny, though, the thing with me is I’ve done tricks, and then I just don’t do them again for a while. I’m not that dude that’s just practicing the same trick over and over. Like I’ll skate with Mikemo (Capaldi) or whatever and sometimes we get out of the car and he’s like, “You wanna play SKATE?” And I’m just like, “What, are you crazy?” Some days, I’m on it. I surprise myself with flatground. But other days, I seriously feel like Gator when he’s trying to skate street in that documentary (laughs).

What would you consider your biggest accomplishment in skateboarding?
What I’m happiest about in skating-even though I’ve been in and out of it-is the longevity and to still actually be able to bring new things to the table. I’ve known so many good skateboarders who just aren’t here anymore. They came and they went, and I just feel blessed to still be in it and bringing something to it. So many heads came and went before their time. Anything good I can contribute I consider a big accomplishment.

What was the last contest you entered?
Well, we used to all do them and actually enjoy them back in the day when we were kids. But I really could not picture myself entering a contest today. Like, I went to the last X Games and watching those guys, I was seriously like a fan. They’re like the best of the best. I mean, I’d see Chris Cole out there doing his ender-ender from whatever video in his jams. Paul Rodriguez-I saw him there. I was just like, “Wow.” It was amazing.

What is the weirdest thing Mark Gonzales ever told you?
I can’t really say. The last time I saw him we were in front of Girl and he had a super fat board and then a regular board, and he’ll try to tell you about a trick, like some weird body varial flip trick you can’t even imagine. One thing about Mark, though, is that even back in the day he would say things all the time like, “You know those frontside noseslides? I want to do one that’s like ten feet long.” And I’d be to myself like, “Okay, the dude has definitely lost it now.” And then someone would do it like five years later. Or with noseblunt-slides, I remember him telling me he wanted to try them and I was just kind of like, “Yeah, I don’t know if people are gonna pick up on that.” And again, I’d tell myself, “Ok, this time he’s really lost it.” But nowadays, no matter how far-fetched a trick he comes up with and talks to me about and I decide again that he’s completely lost it, I don’t know anymore. Maybe he’s right (laughs). Maybe whatever he’s talking about is gonna be the next sh-t.

Is it fair to call this whole thing a comeback?
No, man. People can call this whatever they want. But I didn’t set out to make this a comeback. I’m just skating. And it’s hard work. Skateboarding is hard and I’m putting the effort into it that I need to. But I’ve just awoken from a place where I didn’t want to be and I’m just coming back to where I want to be. It’s just my life. And that’s all it can be.


prise myself with flatground. But other days, I seriously feel like Gator when he’s trying to skate street in that documentary (laughs).

What would you consider your biggest accomplishment in skateboarding?
What I’m happiest about in skating-even though I’ve been in and out of it-is the longevity and to still actually be able to bring new things to the table. I’ve known so many good skateboarders who just aren’t here anymore. They came and they went, and I just feel blessed to still be in it and bringing something to it. So many heads came and went before their time. Anything good I can contribute I consider a big accomplishment.

What was the last contest you entered?
Well, we used to all do them and actually enjoy them back in the day when we were kids. But I really could not picture myself entering a contest today. Like, I went to the last X Games and watching those guys, I was seriously like a fan. They’re like the best of the best. I mean, I’d see Chris Cole out there doing his ender-ender from whatever video in his jams. Paul Rodriguez-I saw him there. I was just like, “Wow.” It was amazing.

What is the weirdest thing Mark Gonzales ever told you?
I can’t really say. The last time I saw him we were in front of Girl and he had a super fat board and then a regular board, and he’ll try to tell you about a trick, like some weird body varial flip trick you can’t even imagine. One thing about Mark, though, is that even back in the day he would say things all the time like, “You know those frontside noseslides? I want to do one that’s like ten feet long.” And I’d be to myself like, “Okay, the dude has definitely lost it now.” And then someone would do it like five years later. Or with noseblunt-slides, I remember him telling me he wanted to try them and I was just kind of like, “Yeah, I don’t know if people are gonna pick up on that.” And again, I’d tell myself, “Ok, this time he’s really lost it.” But nowadays, no matter how far-fetched a trick he comes up with and talks to me about and I decide again that he’s completely lost it, I don’t know anymore. Maybe he’s right (laughs). Maybe whatever he’s talking about is gonna be the next sh-t.

Is it fair to call this whole thing a comeback?
No, man. People can call this whatever they want. But I didn’t set out to make this a comeback. I’m just skating. And it’s hard work. Skateboarding is hard and I’m putting the effort into it that I need to. But I’ve just awoken from a place where I didn’t want to be and I’m just coming back to where I want to be. It’s just my life. And that’s all it can be.