In 2003, surviving as a professional skateboarder without a defined, often generically manifested, image is more of a task than filming that last trick for a video part. Chad Tim Tim has no gimmick other than the fact he’s just the average nice guy who does amazing things on a skateboard. He’s shy and nervously grounded as he often answers, “That’s a good question, or “When you ask me these questions, my mind goes blank. Maybe he was just scared he had to answer another question about his last name in yet another interview … nah, we wouldn’t do that to you, or Chad.

As a professional skateboarder, you skateboard every day, look for new stuff to do, and to push your own personal limits whatever those may be. Have you ever looked at something you’ve done in the past and been like, “Damn, how did I ever do that?

Yeah, for sure. It feels like nowadays I’m digressing. But there’s been stuff I’m psyched on that I don’t know how I’d do now. I don’t know if you’ve seen the New Horizon video, but I was pretty happy how that came out. You’ll learn a new trick, and you’ll lose a trick you have. It’s always in a rotation—it depends on the week. I’ve probably lost it all. It’s a battle trying to keep things consistent. I guess switch flips are in and out for me. I’ll have ‘em for a week, be pscyhed on ‘em, think I have ‘em, get cocky, and the next week I can’t even flip it.

What’s something people would be surprised to know about Chad Tim Tim?

I think I’m just a simple man. I’m a Christian. I’ve been rebuilding vintage bikes. I have three of ‘em that I’ve finished. I’ve done two Schwinns, one a heavyweight and a lightweight girl’s bike. And right now I’m doing a girl’s Royal Flyer. It’s just a hobby—something to keep my mind off other things.

As we sit here right now there are thousands of people losing their homes and personal possessions in the Southern California fires. If you were given 60 seconds to evacuate your home, what would you grab?

My dog Stella, my girlfriend, and my bible.

What does your bible mean to you?

I was born into a Christian family, and the reason I’d take my bible is because I need it. It’s my daily sword to fight off those demons that are out there.

How did your original transition from Dwindle to Giant come about?

I liked what was going on with New Deal. Basically Rob G. was someone I loved to travel and skate with, and I was over World at the time. I guess I wanted a company that was more mature. New Deal didn’t work out, and Popwar ended up coming out. I’m psyched to be where I’m at. I’m very lucky to be where I’m at with people losing sponsors every day.

Obviously you knew Cairo (Foster) was starting something, but did you ever have any doubts about what you’d do with yourself and where you’d end up?

No, because they (Giant) hit us up before. We knew it was coming for a while. They warned us and told us about what could happen in the future. They kind of prepared us in a way, which was very good for our peace of mind. Giant definitely helps out their riders a lot, and I’m psyched to be a part of it.

A board company going out of business is not something that happens every day. How do they inform you? Send you a letter or …

They sat me, Rob, and Kenny down and said, “Look, this is what we’re doing, this is what’s gonna happen, we want you to be a part of this. If not, it ends here. Otherwise we’re gonna keep this going. And that’s basically what happened.

What does it mean to have the opening part in a skateboard video?

I don’t know. Are you talking about the New Deal video?

Well, yeah. Your part in the New Deal video, and just having the first part in general. I mean, the first part is pretty much the second best part to have as a skateboarder. Maybe because it’s the only definitive part other than the closer.

That’s a good qution, I’m not sure. Maybe because I was a rookie. My first board had just come out, so maybe that was the reason. It’s definitely a good part to have. That was basically my first video part—board video part.

You’ve lived in Southern California your entire life. Has not living anywhere else been good or bad for you as a skateboarder?

I guess it’s good because the industry is here. I don’t know how else I’d be in this if I didn’t live here. If I lived in Montana or something, I might be a fisherman and not even be skating.

So you’re the type of person who wouldn’t be sending out sponsor-me tapes to companies?

No, I don’t think so. A friend of mine gave a video to Chet (Thomas) and that’s how I got sponsored.

What about growing up in Southern California being good or bad for you as a person.

In Orange County? I’ll tell you what. I love living in Long Beach, and I love the people here. There are definitely pros and cons. It’s good to be by the beach, and there are definitely different types of people. I don’t know how else I need to say it (laughs).

Who’s the most comfortable-looking person on a skateboard?

There’re a lot. I like Mike Carroll—I think he looks really comfortable. (Danny) Montoya looks really good. Lance Junior here. Errr, Lance Mountain, sorry. You might want to erase that “Junior part. (Tony) Trujillo—he skates fast and comfortable.

Why don’t you ride for Globe anymore?

Lack of communication, basically. And I was pretty much over it. They were going to let me go and I was already looking out the door.

How do you go about finding a new shoe sponsor? You’re someone who said you wouldn’t really send out a sponsor-me tape.

Just try to get coverage and represent who you want to be riding for, stick with it.

Do you have a specific shoe company you’d like to be riding for?

Yeah, I’ve been getting shoes from Adio right now. I’m psyched on what they have going on. Kenny (Anderson) and Danny Montoya over there.

Do you think it’s strange that you don’t have a shoe sponsor right now? Or just any pros in general that have just one sponsor—board or shoe. You guys are professionals, why would one group of people have faith in you and not another?

I think it’s hard to be a pro skater nowadays unless you’ve already made it into the video games or have signed some deal with a corporate company. Every day you hear so-and-so’s not riding for this certain company, and it’s just like, “Damn. Your heart goes out to ‘em ’cause it feels like you could be there in an instant.

What do you feel is missing in skateboarding right now?

Loyalty to companies in skating and to each other individually. The sense of being an outcast is missing from skateboarding because it’s so accepted and it’s such a cool thing right now. You go to a demo and there are more people skating than there are actually watching the demo. I think it should be the opposite in a way. There are soccer moms trying to get their kids to go pro. The reason I started skating was to vent. It wasn’t something cool I did—it was something I did because I wasn’t happy at home or whatever. I’d get home and go skate.

How has skateboarding changed for you? What’s your motivation to skate?

Just to go skate. It’s still the same. I probably lost that feeling for a while, though, because as a pro, you get caught up in everything that’s going on. You have to remember to do your thing and be yourself—that’s the only thing you can do. I’ve been having a lot of fun skating and staying motivated. If people are feeling it, then they’re feeling it. And if not, I don’t care.

What do you think about image these days?

It’s a big rule in skateboarding right now. I’m not going to name names, but … it goes two ways. You could be one of those skaters who stands alone. You skate amazing and have the sponsors to back you. And then there’re people who have images and don’t need to skate. Whatever works for them. They have their image and that’s how they live off skating.

What’s your image?

I don’t think I have an image. I just hope people are feeling the way I skate. And the best way to do that is to maintain a positive outlook on skating. That sounds corny (laughs).

As far as Popwar goes, Cairo’s the visualizer, Kenny’s the eclectic nomad, Rob’s the guy with the headphones eternally repping the LBC. Who’s Chad Tim Tim in all this?

I’m the glue that holds everyone together. Everyone comes to me with their problems. I have to set ‘em straight.

and have the sponsors to back you. And then there’re people who have images and don’t need to skate. Whatever works for them. They have their image and that’s how they live off skating.

What’s your image?

I don’t think I have an image. I just hope people are feeling the way I skate. And the best way to do that is to maintain a positive outlook on skating. That sounds corny (laughs).

As far as Popwar goes, Cairo’s the visualizer, Kenny’s the eclectic nomad, Rob’s the guy with the headphones eternally repping the LBC. Who’s Chad Tim Tim in all this?

I’m the glue that holds everyone together. Everyone comes to me with their problems. I have to set ‘em straight.