Reviews

Fourstar
Super Champion Funzone

The Crail clique knows how to make a tour video watchable. Because let’s not kid ourselves: park footage and Roman candles have limited appeal by now. Like Hot Chocolate and Harsh Euro Barge before it, Super Champion Funzone balances a premeditated storyline with unforced, on-the-road spontaneity that makes a tour so much fun to begin with. And Tokyo is the ideal backdrop: Brian Anderson and his natural switch tre flips look unnaturally (and comically) tall next to the Japanese, Koston’s fondness for dork tricks doesn’t seem so dorky alongside local lion-maned males. Throw in precious Gonz footage, a slew of DVD extras that could easily pass for features, and a big-hearted but broken-English-speaking skate ambassador and what do you get? A super champion fun film indeed.—Carleton Curtis

Gareth Stehr’s Go Go Toe Jam
Foundation

Featuring Leo Romero, Matt Allen, Angel Ramirez, Gareth Stehr and the rest of the Foundation team skating across the U.S. on a summer tour, I know some chumps must be thinking, “Great, another tour video. But those people are haters and miss the true point of this video, which is the shit-park. By shit-park I mean that one park nobody goes to anymore because it’s a pile of cement shit. If you can watch this without wanting to skate a shit-park right after, you’re a stronger person than me. A few friends and I watched this twice and then had a few-hour sesh at a horrible park we hadn’t been to in years—and actually had fun. Beyond that, the skating here is top notch, and thanks go out to Beagle and Greg for possibly bringing joy back into concrete wastelands once again, but I doubt it.—Boosh

Skateboard Party
Red Dragons

Being that I really love my homeys up north, I wanted to write more about Paul Trep, Moses Itkonen, and the whole gang, and how Ryan Oughton is the most underrated cat on earth, but there isn’t enough room in TWS or even the phone book for me to voice that, so just go look at my first and only video part that has been distributed at all. You’ll need to go to the bonus section, and once it loads, click “up two times and the red “Nate Sherwood will pop up. Hit enter and you’re good to go.—Nate Sherwood was going to use a pen name but is broke and needs the money

411
Volume 13 Number 3

Being 26 years old, broke, alone, sad, and depressed ’cause most of your friends are married or have good jobs while you’re just being a pile of shit worrying why the world hates is rough. No, it’s not all milk and cookies, kids. Well, about the video—Rob G. is the shit, Guru makes me want to go listen to Gangstarr, Ortiz is a funny guy who forgot how to answer his phone, The Popwar team is strong as ever, and Mike V. is a great comedian when put in front of a video screen and told to commentate a video skateboard contest. I now feel as if I forgot about my midlife crisis like Faith No More.—Nate Sherwood

You Must Already Own
Tim and Henry’s Pack of Lies
Blind Skateboards
1992

On the smoldering charcoal Enigma heels of Video Days, Blind seemingly needed a miracle to fill the roster losses of both founding heads Mark Gonzales and Jason Lee. However, a touch of Brian Lotti, and full Tim Gavin and Henry Sanchez parts got about as close as possible on the innovation front as a ’92 promotional banger possibly could—and in a miniscule eight minutes running time, mind you. Throw in a teaspoon of Guy Mariano (the switch tre, switch big flip, and casual World Savings gold rail noseslide) along with a pinch of Rudy Johnson (switch dubs), and you’ve got the makings of a minimalist masterpiece. With the cream of the hometown crop, Gavin and Sanch blaze lines through L.A.’s heyday spots from The Ponds and The Beach curbs and manny, to Beryl’s impossible bank-to-ledge. You can’t forget Henry on EMB slash-and-burn SF annihilation fame—all chhallengers lay bare to the beats of the UMCs and Sabbath. Only to be re-lit and rewound by Blind’s Virtual Reality Plan B friends section a year later, this classic VHS showstopper should be as deep in your vault as a landmark on leap year.—Mackenzie Eisenhour