Seu: “Ronnie, do you want to work on an interview for Transworld?”

Ronnie: “Hell yeah¿let’s do it.”

That was the question I asked Ronnie two and a half years ago when I first met and began shooting photos of him. I thought to myself, “How sick would it be to see a Ronnie Creager Pro Spotlight?” This guy’s never had an interview, and he’s one of the most amazing skateboarders around. When he said yes, I was so psyched on shooting it. There I was, this young kid who just got a job working for Dwindle, and I was about to do a Pro Spotlight with Ronnie Creager. I couldn’t even imagine how difficult it would be getting him to stick it out.

Not only was it hard to save a batch of good photos, but to have him answer a whole interview was like pulling out wisdom teeth. Basically, it’s been a work-in-progress for over two and half years. Every time we actually shot a photo we both liked, Ronnie would end up using it for an ad or had other plans for it. So the interview never got started.

In the last couple months, however, the idea was reborn. Once again we shot more photos, but this time I told him the photos didn’t come out. That way I could get more shots of Ronnie without him wanting to use them for other projects. Boys and girls, with all the hard work he’s put in, and the lies I had to make up, I hope you enjoy Ronnie Creager’s Pro Spotlight.¿Seu Trinh

Skateboarding was always for me. I set the standards¿I rode when I wanted and rested when I needed.

Where are you right now?

At home.

What are you listening to on your CD player?

The house CD player is empty, but the car’s got a couple in it. I was listening to the song Rick Howard used in his Plan B video part¿”Grey Cell Green.” I got the CD in San Francisco for a dollar-95.

What’s in your pockets?

Back-right pocket, nothing; back-left pocket, nothing; front-right pocket, two pennies¿but I’ve put them on the counter now that I’ve found them; and in my front-left pocket, a little bit of lint.

D.O.B. and where were you born?

I was born on January 14, 1974 in the city of Orange.

You were born and raised in Orange County, and live there now. Do you think you’ll always live there?

I think I’ll live here forever, but I’d like to have vacation houses all over the world.

When and how did you start skating?

Around the age of four I could do a couple tricks, but before then I was only on my belly.

When you first started, which skaters did you look up to?

Ah, you know, just friends and everybody who rode a skateboard. I loved watching videos and looking at magazines.

Why a skateboarder instead of playing soccer, baseball, football, or some other sport?

Skateboarding was always for me. I set the standards¿I rode when I wanted and rested when I needed. I liked the feeling of being my own coach. Plus, I never had to run laps or do exercises for an hour. All those warm, sunny days wasting away trying to beat another team just made me want to skate more.

What would you do if you weren’t a skateboarder?

If I had to give up skateboarding and go in search of another profession, I’d lose my mind and go insane to the fullest.

How much has skateboarding changed since you were an up-and-comer?

I don’t know. I’ve been too busy having fun skateboarding and doing other things to stop and look. Time whizzes by when I’m having fun.

What do you like most about skateboarding? What do you like least about it?

Most¿the feeling I get from skateboarding. It’s wonderful. A little tingle from the heart saying thanks¿that feels great. Least¿not being able to skateboard, and the pain I get from realizing I won’t be able to skate or film for a long time after I injure melf. And the fact that it’ll take months to heal, and more months to find any salvageable confidence and rebuild what little control I had before.

Do you like to travel? Where’s your favorite place to tour?

I like to travel when I’m not filming or working on something. Sometimes I’ll get a phone call saying, “Your airplane leaves tomorrow at 8:00 a.m. Pack for a month to be on the safe side, show your ID at the ticket counter for your ticket, check your mail for per diem, and hey, don’t forget your passport, stupid. Bye.”

How old were you when you turned pro?

Eighteen years old.

Do you feel the pressure to perform¿do demos, compete in contests, sign autographs, travel¿because you’re a pro?

My main pressure comes from filming for videos and shooting photos. I’m kind of hard on myself when it comes to that. Traveling and the others just come in the package.

Did you ever think skating was going to get as big as it is now and expect to make a living from it?

Nope.

Where do you see skateboarding in ten years?

If I were to pretend I was psychic and let my imagination think of something, I’d say in ten years skateboarding will be in a lot of older and younger kids’ lives. That sounds like one of those lame psychic sayings, huh? I have no idea really.

Because just about every door has been opened trick-wise, are we going to see young kids kickflipping backside tailsliding to kickflip out on ten-stair rails more frequently?

I hope so.

We’ve seen you jump down rails in the past. Do you plan on joining the gnar movement, taking your technical super-control to the big ledges and rails?

Ha, ha¿that’s funny. I wish I had technical super-control. It all depends on whether I’m feeling aggressive or not. I’ve been trying to stay closer to the ground¿I don’t like finding myself in unsafe predicaments. I can hear my ankles and knees calling out to me, “Please, Ronnie¿please don’t go flying today.”

Do you have a favorite hat to skate in?

It switches from hats to beanies to those smaller fisherman-hat things.

As a teamrider, you’ve always stayed with your sponsors for a considerable amount of time. Is sponsor loyalty important to you?

Heck yeah. I think so.

Before the éS video, we didn’t see much Creager footage. What were you doing?

I’ve been filming and shooting photos. Seu Trinh has been holding all my photos for a long time and trying to get me to do this interview thing. I go out and practice all the time so I can get a good visual of something I want to film. Lately it’s been a nonstop filming mess to get everything possible.

We all know you can do amazing tricks, so why was your video part so short?

I had footage that was left out ’cause it didn’t go with the music.

What happened with éS? Why are you no longer riding for them?

They weren’t happy with the way I was skateboarding. I was told at a meeting that I needed to prove myself shoe-worthy and to jump down handrails and stairs to stay on the team. I felt like I was being brainwashed.

Is Blind working on a full-length feature video?

Totally. I think the name Up In Smoke is a favorite right now.

What’s your favorite video of all time?

Tim and Henry’s promotional video and Blind’s Video Days.

Is switch just as easy for you as regular?

I can’t do normal 360 flips, hardflips, varial flips, front-foot impossibles, heelflips, or fakie hardflips¿and the list goes on. But I can switch my stance and do all of them fine. It’s weird like that sometimes.

How many hours a day did you spend working on the super-fast flick needed for the multi-trick combos you’ve mastered?

I haven’t mastered anything in my whole life. Sometimes I can’t even spell my name right when I sign autographs.

Any good stories to tell?

Marty Farty had a party, and all the farts were there. But Tooty Fruity let off a beauty, and all the farts went out for air. Is that a story?

Does skateboarding still have the fun element, or has it gotten too jockish?

Fun, fun, fun.

What do you do when you’re not skating?

I think about tricks that would be good in lines and find spots that look fun. My brain is thinking about skateboarding pretty much 24 hours a day. I have dreams that I can’t fall off my skateboard. I’ll try a trick the next morning and slam right to the ground.

How’s the fingerboard career panning out?

It’s not.

How many times have you qualified first in a professional skateboard contest?

I want to say one, but I forget.

How many contests have you won?

Can you say, “One won or won one” five times at whatever speed? What a couple of weird English words to put together and say. I’m still searching for the answer on how to win and do really good at contests. I do okay about one-point-five times out of two years.

Do you suffer from low self-esteem?

Maybe, kind of, possibly, sometimes.

What is it about Blind that’s kept you stoked all these years?

Everything in the world.

In your opinion, who has the all-time best video part?

I’m thinking Pat Duffy.

What’s the hardest trick you’ve ever tried?

I get frustrated with my flatground tricks all the time. That’s a tough one. I usually don’t try it if I think it’s too hard. I’ve had some fun with 720 flips.

You’ve been a pro for a while and seen the many changes of street skating, from pressure flips to double-digit handrails. In your eyes, what do you think has been the most fun era?

Having no car¿skating twenty miles for a double-sided curb or a three-stair rail. Pressure flips are wonderful.

What was the most fun trick you’ve ever landed?

It changes every day. I’ll have a different favorite or funnest trick every couple weeks. It might be a flip today, but tomorrow it could be a shove-it.

I only have a couple of paragraphs to talk about some swigity-swag intro or something, so here goes. Thanks very much to my sponsors that have supported me and my flip-flop, low-to-the-ground, slow-moving skateboarding, which I love so much. That includes you, yes, you¿Blind skateboards, Tensor trucks, Black Top Griptape, and HSCmailorder.com. For my new shoe creation I’m working on, wish me luck. I haven’t found a name for it yet so I’ll leave a blank spot here . Thanks and hi to family, friends, earthlings, ghosts, pets, whatever, and all the skateboarders out there skateboarding. Oh, and um … never mind.

P.S. I forgot to put Droors clothing for one of my sponsors in my outro. Did I mess up? Is it too late? I don’t want to be a naked skateboarder skateboarding¿that would suck really bad. I could do a double 360 flip Indy grab then land in backside lipslide down a contest rail and all you would see would be a dingy dangling. That would suck.¿Ronnie Creager

y whole life. Sometimes I can’t even spell my name right when I sign autographs.

Any good stories to tell?

Marty Farty had a party, and all the farts were there. But Tooty Fruity let off a beauty, and all the farts went out for air. Is that a story?

Does skateboarding still have the fun element, or has it gotten too jockish?

Fun, fun, fun.

What do you do when you’re not skating?

I think about tricks that would be good in lines and find spots that look fun. My brain is thinking about skateboarding pretty much 24 hours a day. I have dreams that I can’t fall off my skateboard. I’ll try a trick the next morning and slam right to the ground.

How’s the fingerboard career panning out?

It’s not.

How many times have you qualified first in a professional skateboard contest?

I want to say one, but I forget.

How many contests have you won?

Can you say, “One won or won one” five times at whatever speed? What a couple of weird English words to put together and say. I’m still searching for the answer on how to win and do really good at contests. I do okay about one-point-five times out of two years.

Do you suffer from low self-esteem?

Maybe, kind of, possibly, sometimes.

What is it about Blind that’s kept you stoked all these years?

Everything in the world.

In your opinion, who has the all-time best video part?

I’m thinking Pat Duffy.

What’s the hardest trick you’ve ever tried?

I get frustrated with my flatground tricks all the time. That’s a tough one. I usually don’t try it if I think it’s too hard. I’ve had some fun with 720 flips.

You’ve been a pro for a while and seen the many changes of street skating, from pressure flips to double-digit handrails. In your eyes, what do you think has been the most fun era?

Having no car¿skating twenty miles for a double-sided curb or a three-stair rail. Pressure flips are wonderful.

What was the most fun trick you’ve ever landed?

It changes every day. I’ll have a different favorite or funnest trick every couple weeks. It might be a flip today, but tomorrow it could be a shove-it.

I only have a couple of paragraphs to talk about some swigity-swag intro or something, so here goes. Thanks very much to my sponsors that have supported me and my flip-flop, low-to-the-ground, slow-moving skateboarding, which I love so much. That includes you, yes, you¿Blind skateboards, Tensor trucks, Black Top Griptape, and HSCmailorder.com. For my new shoe creation I’m working on, wish me luck. I haven’t found a name for it yet so I’ll leave a blank spot here . Thanks and hi to family, friends, earthlings, ghosts, pets, whatever, and all the skateboarders out there skateboarding. Oh, and um … never mind.

P.S. I forgot to put Droors clothing for one of my sponsors in my outro. Did I mess up? Is it too late? I don’t want to be a naked skateboarder skateboarding¿that would suck really bad. I could do a double 360 flip Indy grab then land in backside lipslide down a contest rail and all you would see would be a dingy dangling. That would suck.¿Ronnie Creager