Anthony Van Engelen Interview

One time in Southern California I saw a man on a small skateboard pushing with his hands. The man only had a torso, in all he was a gut, ribs, arms, head. No legs. He wore a beard, long-brown hair, flannel shirt, and huge aviator shades. As he got close to me I was quite frightened by his appearance. Being all of seven years old, I’d never seen anything like him. I will always have his image embroidered in my head.

I’ve known Anthony Van Engelen for some odd years now. My friendship with him constantly changes, which is a good thing. We don’t really share the same opinions, and I often think he’s a selfish arrogant bastard. Well¿I am, too. That’s the main thing we have in common. I never really talked to anybody about what I saw when I was seven, it just seemed unbelievable. When Anthony was about eight years old he saw the same man with no legs skateby the front of his house, and the image stuck with him as well. Now Anthony’s good at skateboarding. Appreciate him.¿Jason Dill

Interview by Atiba Let’s just start with the basics. Where were you born?

In San Diego.

Did you move to Orange County after San Diego?

Yeah, I lived in so many places in Orange County, like Costa Mesa, Emerald Bay, Santa Ana, Irvine, all over. When I was twelve we moved up to L.A. for four years, then went back to Orange County.

Did you start skating when you moved up to L.A.?

Yeah. I had a skateboard, but I was never outside of my apartment, really. I’d just go home and skate the parking garage. I had a Vision Lee Ralph.

Was that your first board?

It was my first pro board. But I didn’t really skate then. I just kind of rolled around.

Did you pick a Lee Ralph?

Yeah, I liked the graphics. I remember it was my birthday and my stepdad was like, “What do you want?” “I’ll get a skateboard.” Actually, my first skateboard was a Kamikaze that my grandma bought for ten dollars on the beach off this kid, because I wanted it so bad. I remember it got run over by a car. I duct taped the middle of it trying to keep it alive.

What was your first Veraflex?

It was the Kamikaze. I grew up in California by the beach. They had banana boards when I was down there. I’ve just always been around skateboards.

Did you surf?

A little bit. I got into surfing when I was sixteen. I was skating, but not very much.

When did you start learning tricks?

At thirteen or fourteen. I met this kid who knew how to ollie, and I started ollieing. After learning that first ollie I was destined to be a dirty skater.

After the ollie, where did it go? How long did it take you to get sponsored? How did you get sponsored?

My first sponsor was Volcom, actually. Skating with Ian Gant, he’s my boy. I was probably on Volcom by the time I was fourteen.

Also Channel One, right?

Yeah. Ian hooked me up. Then I just got on by talking to Marty Jiminez on the phone.

Did you ever want to turn pro for them¿were you ever thinkin’ that at all?

No. When I was sixteen I wasn’t even thinking I was ever gonna turn pro.

So did you quit Channel One or what?

I left when I was sixteen to Russia, and when I came back I still rode for Channel One.

Why’d you go to Russia?

‘Cause I wasn’t doing anything. I dropped out of high school. I hated school¿I was just being your typical teenager who doesn’t want to do anything his parents tell him to do. Just being the dirtbag.

Gnarly.

I saw a dead guy on the side of the road in Russia with nobody around. He got hit by a car or something. His bloody head was in the gutter. No one was even stopping to look at him, just driving right by. We had a stoplight and the guy was just laying there. We were in a cab, so they’re not gonna stop. Cabs are crazy there. You just put out your hand, and anybody will come pick you up. Anybody, like some guy driving his family around. Give him a couple bucks and he’ll just take you somewhere everytime.

I can even picture you being that rowdy.

I was drinking¿not that it was stopping me from going to school, I was just over it. My stepfather lived there, he’s an ex-Marine. He grew up rough, so he’s like, “Yeah, send him over to me, I’ll take care of him.” So at the time I was like, “I’ll go to Russia¿full adventure, f¿k going back to school. I’ll go check some shit out.” I went over there, and by no means did I live like I was living here: bread, eggs, tomatoes. Every day, all day. I’ll make you a hundred meals out of that¿lots of macaroni and cheese. The good thing was when I would have some money, every once in a while I’d get a little hamburger from McDonald’s.

Live large.

Just livin’ on a Double Double with french fries. You gotta pay for ketchup packets there, too. If I got three ketchup packets, I was living large. Of course, I was wearing my stepfather’s clothes two months into the trip, so I looked like Springsteen walking down the street¿butt-tight Levi’s, torn-up T-shirts with his marathon-like 1976 Hellridge. It was pretty rough living over there.

When you went over there, did you skate at all? Did you hook up with Vuckovich?

I told Marty before I left that I was going there, and he hooked me up with Miki. Miki gave me some numbers of some skaters over there. I brought boards with me, but I didn’t have trucks. That’s how over skating I was. I brought boards, but I wasn’t sweating it that much. I didn’t even have griptape.

You can’t get trucks in Russia?

You can’t get shit there. What you see is what you get¿nothing. I had boards, wheels, and bearings. So I get there and call this kid up. I take a train for about 45 minutes out to the suburbs and hook up with this kid. They had a little skatepark in this parking lot. Steel quarterpipes that were four-feet wide, and a little steel box that was real small. These kids were stuck in 1992. BB wheels, just a torn up World deck, not even World deck, I don’t know what they were riding, and big cut-off pants.

So you lived in Russia five years ago?

Dude, it was less than five years ago, it was four years ago. So anyway, I’m there. I hook up with these kids. I just come with boards and wheels in my hand, like “Where can I get hooked up?” A kid had a Tracker Truck and some other random Indy. They’re both totally different-sized trucks¿like a hot rod, jacked in the back, dropped in the front. The thing looked like a Mustang. He’s like, “Leave your board with me, I’ll put griptape on it.” So this dude had red sandpaper that he glued on my board. I had this board with red griptape, but it was like sandpaper. It was just pasted on there. Then the Tracker truck. So I skated probably two days, and I was over it. Over the spot, couldn’t really speak to the kids. It worked out that probably a month into my stay I got a job at a night club. A guy named Lucky, a Nigerian dude, owned the night club. He got shot in the head a week before I worked there in Nigeria. He was a drug dealer. They had a picture of him in front of the club right when you walked in with flowers around it. RIP. Lucky. Not so lucky. So I get a job there. The place is basically a whorehouse: high-class hookers went in there, Guccied out, Chanel, thousand-dollar-a-night hookers, maybe more, same girls in there every night, same time.

Businessmen were going there?

No, mafia. A lot of mafia there. I guess you can call them businessmen¿whatever you want to call them. Russia is run by mafia. If there’s a guy selling a watermelon on the corner, he’s paying somebody. Nothing can touch him.

You didn’t even get paid to work at the bar, huh?

No. I didn’t get paid a dime to work there. I was a bartender, behind the bar shaking drinks, throwing bottles behind my back.

So he would pay for your food and stuff?

Well, my mom would send me money each month. I’d get like 300 dollars a month.

That goes far in Russia.

Not really, it’s just like here. Once you come down to your last 50 bucks, you can make that last a long time. But until then, you’re hamburgers, french fries¿”Need a new pair of kicks, even though I’ve got this busted Springteen kit on, I need to have new Nikes.” Oh, just trying to live with some shitty Nikes on.

And not skating?

Not skating at all.

So would you say you quit for seven months?

Yeah, and I wasn’t skating much before I left, either. I didn’t skate for a while, seriously. So I was there for almost seven months. I’d talked my way into getting a plane ticket home from my mom, so I could go there for Christmas. My stepfather didn’t want me to go, he was like “No, no, stay. I don’t think you’re ready to go home yet.” So I went home, conned my way into it, and was supposed to fly back two weeks later. Never did. I was over it. Once I got home, I was home. When I came home after living like that I respected things a lot more, instead of being a dirtbag. I went back to a continuation school and started skating again. For some reason I had a new passion for skateboarding. That’s where it got me.

Right when you got back?

Right when I got back. For some reason I was sparked on skating, that’s all I wanted to do.

Do you think quiting helped your skating?

Yeah. It felt like it was refreshing not to skate that long, and then get back on my board and learn things. I was so sparked on it. Because I could already skate, and then to start learning new things quickly¿it felt so rad.

So after you got back here, you were riding for Channel One?

Yeah. Then when I came back Shaun Mandoli lived right by me. I started skating with him a lot, and he started getting me flowed by Real.

Were you thinking of turning pro when you got back?

Yeah. I was psyched on skating¿I wanted to do something with it when I came back.

How long did you get flowed by Real?

Probably a couple months, not too long. Then I started skating with Dill, and he got me on 23.

Then after 23 to …

Workshop.

Of course everyone wants to know, who were you psyched on when you were a kid?

I was psyched on so many people. See, by the time I was skating, my Lee Ralph was already outdated. So my first real board was Jason Lee’s first Cat In The Hat board by Blind. Even then I wasn’t really paying attention to what was really going in skateboarding; I was just skating, having fun. I started paying attention late in the game, so some of the people I looked up to where Henry Sanchez, people like that. I always knew Gonz was rad, I liked him a lot. I didn’t even see Video Days until a year after it’d been out, so that’s kind of crazy. I was real stoked on Sanchez. I always liked Jason Lee a lot, he was sick.

You’re psyched on watching Love Child?

Oh, Jovantae Turner, definitely stoked on Jovantae. I always saw Kareem a lot. Who else? Jed Walters. I loved Jed, just psyched on the dude. And once those Plan B videos came out, I was hyped on that whole thing. Sheffey was one of my favorites, just ollieing huge shit, late shove-its over anything, just gnarly. I liked Danny Way a lot, too. I’m down for him.

How about nowadays?

Guy Mariano is definitely one of my top favorite skaters ever. Recently, Brian Anderson is one of my favorites, just f¿king rips. Rowley … gnarly, love that dude. Who else is just off the meat rack? Arto sick as f¿k. I’m down for Reynolds, definitely.

What is your day-to-day deal?

Not much. Not much of anything. I get up and call Atiba trying to get this last-minute photo.

For about a month now.

For about a month, so I don’t do much, obviously. I get up. Sometimes I’m hung over, sometimes I’m not. I go skate. We usually drive around L.A., all around downtown areas, all the suburbs, the ghetto, just driving around trying to find spots, end up at the same spots we always skate, try the same trick I knew I couldn’t do last week, and you know, that’s pretty much it. And then sometimes you get one ofe. Once you come down to your last 50 bucks, you can make that last a long time. But until then, you’re hamburgers, french fries¿”Need a new pair of kicks, even though I’ve got this busted Springteen kit on, I need to have new Nikes.” Oh, just trying to live with some shitty Nikes on.

And not skating?

Not skating at all.

So would you say you quit for seven months?

Yeah, and I wasn’t skating much before I left, either. I didn’t skate for a while, seriously. So I was there for almost seven months. I’d talked my way into getting a plane ticket home from my mom, so I could go there for Christmas. My stepfather didn’t want me to go, he was like “No, no, stay. I don’t think you’re ready to go home yet.” So I went home, conned my way into it, and was supposed to fly back two weeks later. Never did. I was over it. Once I got home, I was home. When I came home after living like that I respected things a lot more, instead of being a dirtbag. I went back to a continuation school and started skating again. For some reason I had a new passion for skateboarding. That’s where it got me.

Right when you got back?

Right when I got back. For some reason I was sparked on skating, that’s all I wanted to do.

Do you think quiting helped your skating?

Yeah. It felt like it was refreshing not to skate that long, and then get back on my board and learn things. I was so sparked on it. Because I could already skate, and then to start learning new things quickly¿it felt so rad.

So after you got back here, you were riding for Channel One?

Yeah. Then when I came back Shaun Mandoli lived right by me. I started skating with him a lot, and he started getting me flowed by Real.

Were you thinking of turning pro when you got back?

Yeah. I was psyched on skating¿I wanted to do something with it when I came back.

How long did you get flowed by Real?

Probably a couple months, not too long. Then I started skating with Dill, and he got me on 23.

Then after 23 to …

Workshop.

Of course everyone wants to know, who were you psyched on when you were a kid?

I was psyched on so many people. See, by the time I was skating, my Lee Ralph was already outdated. So my first real board was Jason Lee’s first Cat In The Hat board by Blind. Even then I wasn’t really paying attention to what was really going in skateboarding; I was just skating, having fun. I started paying attention late in the game, so some of the people I looked up to where Henry Sanchez, people like that. I always knew Gonz was rad, I liked him a lot. I didn’t even see Video Days until a year after it’d been out, so that’s kind of crazy. I was real stoked on Sanchez. I always liked Jason Lee a lot, he was sick.

You’re psyched on watching Love Child?

Oh, Jovantae Turner, definitely stoked on Jovantae. I always saw Kareem a lot. Who else? Jed Walters. I loved Jed, just psyched on the dude. And once those Plan B videos came out, I was hyped on that whole thing. Sheffey was one of my favorites, just ollieing huge shit, late shove-its over anything, just gnarly. I liked Danny Way a lot, too. I’m down for him.

How about nowadays?

Guy Mariano is definitely one of my top favorite skaters ever. Recently, Brian Anderson is one of my favorites, just f¿king rips. Rowley … gnarly, love that dude. Who else is just off the meat rack? Arto sick as f¿k. I’m down for Reynolds, definitely.

What is your day-to-day deal?

Not much. Not much of anything. I get up and call Atiba trying to get this last-minute photo.

For about a month now.

For about a month, so I don’t do much, obviously. I get up. Sometimes I’m hung over, sometimes I’m not. I go skate. We usually drive around L.A., all around downtown areas, all the suburbs, the ghetto, just driving around trying to find spots, end up at the same spots we always skate, try the same trick I knew I couldn’t do last week, and you know, that’s pretty much it. And then sometimes you get one of those days when you just get something. Maybe you find a new spot, or maybe you went back to that spot, and it just worked for you. So that’s my day, driving around L.A. It’s kind of crazy. I’m in the car more than I’m on my skateboard.

And you enjoy it?

Of course I do. I’m 21, I get up at noon, I do what I want when I want, I have money to do what I want, and I ride a skateboard for a living. I don’t know if you could ask for much more. It’s definitely hard coming up. Skate houses, not much money in your pocket, mom and dad aren’t around, you’re living off a 300- dollar check. You’re living in the team manager’s basement, you’re selling boards, you’re selling new shoes, eating bologna sandwiches. Oh dude, when you get a Jack In The Box meal in your belly, dude, that’s a good day. That’s crazy. Seriously, a year ago I was living so trife. Actually, not even a year ago, trife. Talking like no insurance, huge holes in my teeth, toothaches, no food, no money, just living like a dirt bag. Now things are good: I have a nice place, and all my sponsors help me out.

Getting on the Workshop, how did that work?

Me and Dill were living together in L.A. on Melrose, just in a shithole of an apartment. At the time Quy Nguyen lived with me in my room, and Dill’s girlfriend lived in his room. So there’s four people in a little hole, which sucked. Me and Dill were on 23, and it was just coming to an end. It was just ghetto the way it was run. Sal Barbier had nothing to do with the the business side; it was another guy who was running things who had the money in the company. He was just a loser. So the plan was that we were all going to leave 23 and do something with Sal. But then the Workshop thing came at the time when Dill and I needed it. It was a sick company. So I was on the team. Then I went up to meet Dyrdek, probably about a month after I’d been on the team. Dyrdek had never met me. The first thing out of Dyrdek’s mouth was, “Oh yeah, the kid who just snuck on the team.” Just Dyrdek’s big house, big car, coming into his house, I’m just like, “Huh, okay.” Bird’s in there. “What the f¿k you doing, bitch?” Slowly me and Dyrdek became boys, and now I consider him one of my closest friends.

He kind of vibed you at first?

No, I think he was just trying to break me in. Dyrdek wants to be old pro, he likes the old pro, he likes the dirt pro who partied. Kids today … some of them are cool, but most of are just so plain. They don’t have any flair to them, no personality, really. They’re just your stock room skateboarder. They come with their big shoes, their hot yellow shirt, their beanie with logos everywhere, and that’s their deal. So me and Dyrdek clicked immediately, because I’m kind of a dirtbag, so I think he dug that. I came from such a wild background that most kids don’t come from these days.

Where are you living now?

I’m livin’ in a high-life penthouse.

Such a lie.

Just a liar. No, my shit is sick now. I’m psyched. I couldn’t ask for more. I have everything I’ve ever wanted as far as living goes. I got a Rolly on the arm. There are things I’ve always wanted that I can buy for myself now¿take my mom out to dinner, 100-dollar sushi dinners. Let my mom live a little bit, I love moms.

What about girls, though?

No, I dig the idea of a girlfriend. I wouldn’t mind having one, but I feel like I’m too far gone for a girlfriend. I don’t know if a girl could put up with my shit. I have a hard time getting in touch with my family, let alone calling some girl when I’m on tour. I bet you there’s a girl out there for everybody, though. Even the most hardened partiers eventually calm down. So I’m down for the idea. I wouldn’t mind having a hot little cool chick around. I guess I could put effort toward that. I just never really found that kind of girl.

What’s up with that hickey on your neck?

Oh … there’s a hickey on the neck¿whatever. I feel like I’m in sixth grade or something.

How much cash do you spend in a typical month?

I waste so much cash. I’m a loser.

How much did you spend at 7-Eleven last night?

I don’t know if anybody out there has spent 52 dollars at 7-Eleven, without buying the prepaid cell phone or two cases. I got my Lakers shirt, I had to. It’s so off the meat rack. It’s got the trophy on it, you’ve got Shaq and Kobe flying all over the place, that thing is sick. I had to pick up a few.

So what’d you get for 52 dollars at Sevs?

I got four Lakers shirts, a whiffle-ball bat, some ice, some 7-Up, and I think some beers.

If you saved a lot of money would you want to put it back into a skateboarding company?

Probably not. If I saved a lot of money, I’d just try to invest it wisely. I gotta have Dyrdek take over my accounts. I’m a financial mess¿just a shit mess. Money, here, gone. Hold on to your money, kids. Don’t be a loser, pay your taxes.

What’s with Dill? You guys are inseparable.

Dill’s my boy. I love Dill. He’s sweet. He’s a f¿king freak, definitely. Dill and I come from similar backgrounds as far as fathers go and life growing up¿we just have a lot in common as far as that goes. As far as skating goes, he’s been one of my favorite skateboarders. At times, though, I feel like killing the guy. That’s how friends are, though. I’m sure you’re like that with your brother. You just choke the shit out of each other.

I think that’s it. That’s a long interview.

What about thank yous and shit? I gotta thank Chris Carter and Mike Hill at the Workshop. Everybody at D.C.¿Damon, Block, thanks a lot for everything. Dyrdek, Dill, Atiba, Blabac, the whole crew. There are more people out there, like Searcy for driving my punk-ass around all the time ’cause I ain’t got no car, Mom, family, just everybody, anybody, Ty, f¿kin’ Kastrussi, Sal, Elwood, Luciano, Palmer. I’m probably leaving a lot of people out, too, but I haven’t forgotten you.

ose days when you just get something. Maybe you find a new spot, or maybe you went back to that spot, and it just worked for you. So that’s my day, driving around L.A. It’s kind of crazy. I’m in the car more than I’m on my skateboard.

And you enjoy it?

Of course I do. I’m 21, I get up at noon, I do what I want when I want, I have money to do what I want, and I ride a skateboard for a living. I don’t know if you could ask for much more. It’s definitely hard coming up. Skate houses, not much money in your pocket, mom and dad aren’t around, you’re living off a 300- dollar check. You’re living in the team manager’s basement, you’re selling boards, you’re selling new shoes, eating bologna sandwiches. Oh dude, when you get a Jack In The Box meal in your belly, dude, that’s a good day. That’s crazy. Seriously, a year ago I was living so trife. Actually, not even a year ago, trife. Talking like no insurance, huge holes in my teeth, toothaches, no food, no money, just living like a dirt bag. Now things are good: I have a nice place, and all my sponsors help me out.

Getting on the Workshop, how did that work?

Me and Dill were living together in L.A. on Melrose, just in a shithole of an apartment. At the time Quy Nguyen lived with me in my room, and Dill’s girlfriend lived in his room. So there’s four people in a little hole, which sucked. Me and Dill were on 23, and it was just coming to an end. It was just ghetto the way it was run. Sal Barbier had nothing to do with the the business side; it was another guy who was running things who had the money in the company. He was just a loser. So the plan was that we were all going to leave 23 and do something with Sal. But then the Workshop thing came at the time when Dill and I needed it. It was a sick company. So I was on the team. Then I went up to meet Dyrdek, probably about a month after I’d been on the team. Dyrdek had never met me. The first thing out of Dyrdek’s mouth was, “Oh yeah, the kid who just snuck on the team.” Just Dyrdek’s big house, big car, coming into his house, I’m just like, “Huh, okay.” Bird’s in there. “What the f¿k you doing, bitch?” Slowly me and Dyrdek became boys, and now I consider him one of my closest friends.

He kind of vibed you at first?

No, I think he was just trying to break me in. Dyrdek wants to be old pro, he likes the old pro, he likes the dirt pro who partied. Kids today … some of them are cool, but most of are just so plain. They don’t have any flair to them, no personality, really. They’re just your stock room skateboarder. They come with their big shoes, their hot yellow shirt, their beanie with logos everywhere, and that’s their deal. So me and Dyrdek clicked immediately, because I’m kind of a dirtbag, so I think he dug that. I came from such a wild background that most kids don’t come from these days.

Where are you living now?

I’m livin’ in a high-life penthouse.

Such a lie.

Just a liar. No, my shit is sick now. I’m psyched. I couldn’t ask for more. I have everything I’ve ever wanted as far as living goes. I got a Rolly on the arm. There are things I’ve always wanted that I can buy for myself now¿take my mom out to dinner, 100-dollar sushi dinners. Let my mom live a little bit, I love moms.

What about girls, though?

No, I dig the idea of a girlfriend. I wouldn’t mind having one, but I feel like I’m too far gone for a girlfriend. I don’t know if a girl could put up with my shit. I have a hard time getting in touch with my family, let alone calling some girl when I’m on tour. I bet you there’s a girl out there for everybody, though. Even the most hardened partiers eventually calm down. So I’m down for the idea. I wouldn’t mind having a hot little cool chick around. I guess I could put effort toward that. I just never really found that kind of girl.

What’s up with that hickey on your neck?

Oh … there’s a hickey on the neck¿whatever. I feel like I’m in sixth grade or something.

How much cash do you spend in a typical month?

I waste so much cash. I’m a loser.

How much did you spend at 7-Eleven last night?

I don’t know if anybody out there has spent 52 dollars at 7-Eleven, without buying the prepaid cell phone or two cases. I got my Lakers shirt, I had to. It’s so off the meat rack. It’s got the trophy on it, you’ve got Shaq and Kobe flying all over the place, that thing is sick. I had to pick up a few.

So what’d you get for 52 dollars at Sevs?

I got four Lakers shirts, a whiffle-ball bat, some ice, some 7-Up, and I think some beers.

If you saved a lot of money would you want to put it back into a skateboarding company?

Probably not. If I saved a lot of money, I’d just try to invest it wisely. I gotta have Dyrdek take over my accounts. I’m a financial mess¿just a shit mess. Money, here, gone. Hold on to your money, kids. Don’t be a loser, pay your taxes.

What’s with Dill? You guys are inseparable.

Dill’s my boy. I love Dill. He’s sweet. He’s a f¿king freak, definitely. Dill and I come from similar backgrounds as far as fathers go and life growing up¿we just have a lot in common as far as that goes. As far as skating goes, he’s been one of my favorite skateboarders. At times, though, I feel like killing the guy. That’s how friends are, though. I’m sure you’re like that with your brother. You just choke the shit out of each other.

I think that’s it. That’s a long interview.

What about thank yous and shit? I gotta thank Chris Carter and Mike Hill at the Workshop. Everybody at D.C.¿Damon, Block, thanks a lot for everything. Dyrdek, Dill, Atiba, Blabac, the whole crew. There are more people out there, like Searcy for driving my punk-ass around all the time ’cause I ain’t got no car, Mom, family, just everybody, anybody, Ty, f¿kin’ Kastrussi, Sal, Elwood, Luciano, Palmer. I’m probably leaving a lot of people out, too, but I haven’t forgotten you.

h cash do you spend in a typical month?

I waste so much cash. I’m a loser.

How much did you spend at 7-Eleven last night?

I don’t know if anybody out there has spent 52 dollars at 7-Eleven, without buying the prepaid cell phone or two cases. I got my Lakers shirt, I had to. It’s so off the meat rack. It’s got the trophy on it, you’ve got Shaq and Kobe flying all over the place, that thing is sick. I had to pick up a few.

So what’d you get for 52 dollars at Sevs?

I got four Lakers shirts, a whiffle-ball bat, some ice, some 7-Up, and I think some beers.

If you saved a lot of money would you want to put it back into a skateboarding company?

Probably not. If I saved a lot of money, I’d just try to invest it wisely. I gotta have Dyrdek take over my accounts. I’m a financial mess¿just a shit mess. Money, here, gone. Hold on to your money, kids. Don’t be a loser, pay your taxes.

What’s with Dill? You guys are inseparable.

Dill’s my boy. I love Dill. He’s sweet. He’s a f¿king freak, definitely. Dill and I come from similar backgrounds as far as fathers go and life growing up¿we just have a lot in common as far as that goes. As far as skating goes, he’s been one of my favorite skateboarders. At times, though, I feel like killing the guy. That’s how friends are, though. I’m sure you’re like that with your brother. You just choke the shit out of each other.

I think that’s it. That’s a long interview.

What about thank yous and shit? I gotta thank Chris Carter and Mike Hill at the Workshop. Everybody at D.C.¿Damon, Block, thanks a lot for everything. Dyrdek, Dill, Atiba, Blabac, the whole crew. There are more people out there, like Searcy for driving my punk-ass around all the time ’cause I ain’t got no car, Mom, family, just everybody, anybody, Ty, f¿kin’ Kastrussi, Sal, Elwood, Luciano, Palmer. I’m probably leaving a lot of people out, too, but I haven’t forgotten you.