Skateboarders from our nation’s first capital teach us a lesson about rebellion.

FDR, not “Phillyside”

FDR is to Philadelphia as Burnside is to Portland: city-owned, skater-built, and not for the meek. This sacred space beneath Interstate 95 in South Philly has come a long way since its fledgling days in 1994, when it was born as a result of Philadelphia government’s desire to eliminate skateboarding at Love Park. As a peace offering to Philly skateboarders, the city set aside approximately 16,000 square feet of real estate beneath the highway, laid down a blacktop slab, threw in a couple of pyramids and a grind box, and called it a “skatepark.” City Hall thought this was enough to solve the problems caused by skaters at Love Park; nothing further happened for about a year and a half, until the locals got restless. Inspired by Burnside, and tired of waiting on the City, they took matters into their own hands and started building¿a transition up a support pillar here, a corner bowl there, a mogul or two in between.

Before long, FDR was taking shape, and City Park Commission officials expressed concern when they noticed a “bunker-like structure” being erected on the site. They allowed construction to continue after assurance from skaters that no gun turrets were being installed on the other side, just burly skate terrain.

By the spring of 1997 the volunteer efforts of Philly skaters had firmly established FDR’s foundation: the Bunker wall at 60 feet long, eleven feet high with a foot and a half of vert; the Dome at fourteen feet high with a gnarly overhang extending way past vert; the CIA Pocket; the Indian Wall; the Minefield; and the Sean Miller Memorial Vert Ramp. The following year brought modification of the Minefield.

Nineteen ninety-nine was marked by preparation for expansion of the back section of the park, 25,000 dollars in city funding, and the unfortunate beginning of a low point for the park. By early 2000, heated disagreements over terrain design and specs had eroded the unity that once bonded these skaters in their building efforts. A lack of compromise and rumors of embezzlement fueled tensions between the two factions, escalating to unacceptable extremes¿rebar tear-outs and sledgehammered pool coping. The park endured these ugly growing pains, and by September 2000 the last of 134 cubic yards of cement covered the wounds opened by disputes over the new terrain. Skating once again assumed its rightful prominence at FDR, although lingering bitterness may still prove a threat to the park’s survival.

Make no mistake, FDR has a life of its own¿its pulse is measured by each new layer of graffiti, urethane, and pigeon shit; its soul is fed by the stoke of skaters who come in droves to session here. In just six years, FDR has evolved from a sad excuse for a skatepark built by the city into an East Coast skate mecca built by skaters, drawing heavy usage from Philly locals, skaters from surrounding suburbs, states, and beyond the U.S. FDR is a crossroads that lures an ever-changing cast of characters, from ‘core locals and road-trippers to weekend warriors and clueless parents who send their kids oblivious into the midst of raging sessions, not to mention the wayward Rollerblader.

Some come because they’ve seen photos and footage, some because they’ve heard stories from friends who successfully dodged flying bottle rockets and Roman candles at one of FDR’s legendary Fourth of July skate jams. All come because they know FDR is unique and they crave the experience it offers. It ain’t perfect, but it’s the real deal, and you won’t find anyplace like it.

Those who come should know that FDR is not for everyone¿no “welcome” signs for BMXers, no handrails or double sets, just concrete transition and flow, which is where FDR separates the men from the boys. To work the whole park, you need speed, lines, and balls. Lack any of these, and you’ve missed the point, in which case you shld kick back and enjoy the show. Soak it up, snap some pics, and know that you’re witnessing history.

FDR is a treasure, don’t take it for granted. In the end, it’s all about the skating. Respect it and make it last.¿Bryan Karl Lathrop

FDR In the Words of the Localsby Fernando Enriquez

The story of FDR Skatepark is much like the story of the United States of America. They both began when a government used unpopulated land in an attempt to move a community of people who needed freedom to express themselves. What followed was not expected by anybody; the colonization of these lands did not happen immediately or as planned. It took time, a lot of work, dedication, dreams, sacrifices, and pain. In an effort to tell the skateboarding world how the colonization of FDR Skatepark happened, the following is a collection of conversations, stories, memories, and feelings from skateboarders who have been there since the beginning, as well as recent immigrants.

In the mid 1990s the city of Philadelphia built what they thought was a skatepark.

“My first memory of the park is when the city built it. It was just two crappy pyramids … we went down there and skated right after the city built it.”¿Tim Guza

“We got all stoked, ‘Yeah, a concrete park!’ We went there, and all there was was a ledge and two pyramids.”¿Matt Yula

“When I got there I saw two shitty pyramids that sucked really bad.”¿Rob Erickson

In 1776 the British government lost control over their land in America to a rebel army. More than 200 years later, the city of Philadelphia, the birthplace of America, lost control of what they thought was their city skatepark to rebellious skaters.

“Jimmy Young wanted to build a ramp, but he didn’t want to build a wooden ramp. Carlos was like, ‘Let’s go down there and throw up some stuff in concrete.’ So that was it.”¿Gabe Strain

“My first memory of the park is when a whole group of us were at Reading skatepark talking about the FDR park. Somebody knew where there were cinder blocks that a guy wanted to get rid of … and that would be the start of us building onto the existing park. We had like six trucks … we loaded up on cinder blocks and drove to the park. It was locked, so we had to go in the wrong way over this huge curb.”¿Clive Bagnall

“I remember laying down the fencing for that wall and wondering how it was going to come out, but not really caring that much ’cause we knew it was just an experiment. A grand experiment.”¿Alex Baker

“The inspiration was the fact that we knew it could be done. Jimmy Young was torn between building a wooden ramp and pouring concrete down at the park. I knew if we poured concrete it was going to be permanent.”¿Carlos Biaza

America has been a country built by immigrants, and FDR Skatepark has also seen its share of welcomed skaters.

“The first time I went there, I was in awe.”¿Todd Heyer

“My first session, I was just worried about trying to stay the hell out of anyone’s way who was going three times as fast as me.”¿Adam “Tex” Young

“I’d go down there by myself. I didn’t know anybody down there, didn’t talk to anybody, but eventually that changed. Through being at the park, I’ve met so many people who are now more than just friends … they’ve become like another family.”¿Steve Faas

“I was blown away by the magnitude of it.”¿Lou Rogai

“The layout was massive, complete with a lumpy, bowled-out section with a tight vert hip the CIA Pocket, two flat-bank pyramids, two lumpy titties, and a tight quarterpipe to vert pillar that ran up to the highway overhead. The heavies were flying around, sticking huge, screeching wallrides up the pillar, popping over the titties and the pyramids, and generally snaking everyone.”¿David “Trout” Fisher

“I remember Daily Dave yelling at me like ten times. He was like, ‘Mo, just look where you’re going!’”¿Matt Yula

The colonists who came to this country were in search of a better life, a life where the land they lived in could mean something special to them. It could have been freedom or just adventure. So does FDR Skatepark represent anything more than just a place to skate?

“It’s a place where I can go and have fun with my friends. It’s a place where I can go and forget about the rest of the world and everything else that normal people worry about. I just go there and take it out on myself and the park. I guess it’s a big pill. Once I get to the park, everything is cool, I just relax like I’m on Prozac or something. I don’t think about anything except hanging out at the park and having a blast.”¿J.P. Jakel

“Just the essentials: speed lines, urethane, concrete, and freedom.”¿David “Trout” Fisher

“It opened up so many new things to me … it taught me how to be a man.”¿Jessi Gullings

“It’s what skateboarding is all about, taking over and building your own environment … making it happen.”¿Rick Charnoski

“The park is a release of all bad energy and aggression. You show up, and you could be in the worst mood in the world. Then in five minutes you’re going to be completely out of breath sitting on the side in a better mood because you took out all your aggression on the pool coping and the people you knocked over.”¿Matt Yula

“The park pretty much saved my skating. If it wasn’t for the park, I don’t know what I’d be doing … but that place will always be there, and someone I know will always be riding there. The park is a second home for a lot of people, and it was for me for a while.”¿Todd Heyer

“I treat the place like it was a VFW lodge, my favorite place to go unwind and relax. Contrary to what people think, it’s not really rough around the edges.”¿George Draguns

“It’s our own scene … it’s the ultimate. It’s what you always wished you had when you started skating.”¿Clive Bagnall

“FDR is where I’ve found my closest friends.”¿Lou Rogai

“It means a lot to me. It’s where we can go and skate what we want to skate and not have to abide by any rules. We don’t have to run from police¿we can just be who we are.”¿Andrew Clark

“A lot of people think of it as FDR Skatepark, but I don’t think the park was ever considered a skatepark in the true sense of a skatepark … it’s more of a skate spot. It’s like your favorite little ditch. You go down and throw a curb block on top of it, but you don’t call it a skatepark, you call it a skate spot, and it just keeps changing.”¿Steve Faas

“I think the park shows how creative this generation is. It’s fighting the old generation where we just need to do it, we don’t need to ask. We need to make what we want to make the world a better place.”¿Carlos Biaza

The course of American history has caused many changes in not only the world but also in individuals’ lives. FDR Skatepark has also had an impact on both the overall skateboarding scene in this city and in many skaters’ lives.

“FDR Changed the way I thought about skateboarding. It influenced me to move here.”¿Adam “Tex” Young

“It’s part of my lifestyle; I go there a lot skate and rage. It’s like my church.”¿Bud Baum

“It helped me progress as a skateboarder and gave me new ways to express myself on my stunt wood.”¿Joe Peleckis

“The park made me go from skating pure street and ledges to wanting to skate mostly transitions and go fast. FDR helps you figure out your purpose and the true meaning of skating.”¿Lou Rogai

“It brought me back to real skateboarding¿not just going out and trying the best trick ’cause you want to be the best, but going out and having a blast with a bunch of people, no matter what trick you’re doing.”¿J.P. Jakel

“I basically skate more now because of the park.”¿Andrew Clark

“When I was in college it was the only place I had to skate. I’d go up there almost every day and skate. It was sick.”¿Rob Erickson

“It were in search of a better life, a life where the land they lived in could mean something special to them. It could have been freedom or just adventure. So does FDR Skatepark represent anything more than just a place to skate?

“It’s a place where I can go and have fun with my friends. It’s a place where I can go and forget about the rest of the world and everything else that normal people worry about. I just go there and take it out on myself and the park. I guess it’s a big pill. Once I get to the park, everything is cool, I just relax like I’m on Prozac or something. I don’t think about anything except hanging out at the park and having a blast.”¿J.P. Jakel

“Just the essentials: speed lines, urethane, concrete, and freedom.”¿David “Trout” Fisher

“It opened up so many new things to me … it taught me how to be a man.”¿Jessi Gullings

“It’s what skateboarding is all about, taking over and building your own environment … making it happen.”¿Rick Charnoski

“The park is a release of all bad energy and aggression. You show up, and you could be in the worst mood in the world. Then in five minutes you’re going to be completely out of breath sitting on the side in a better mood because you took out all your aggression on the pool coping and the people you knocked over.”¿Matt Yula

“The park pretty much saved my skating. If it wasn’t for the park, I don’t know what I’d be doing … but that place will always be there, and someone I know will always be riding there. The park is a second home for a lot of people, and it was for me for a while.”¿Todd Heyer

“I treat the place like it was a VFW lodge, my favorite place to go unwind and relax. Contrary to what people think, it’s not really rough around the edges.”¿George Draguns

“It’s our own scene … it’s the ultimate. It’s what you always wished you had when you started skating.”¿Clive Bagnall

“FDR is where I’ve found my closest friends.”¿Lou Rogai

“It means a lot to me. It’s where we can go and skate what we want to skate and not have to abide by any rules. We don’t have to run from police¿we can just be who we are.”¿Andrew Clark

“A lot of people think of it as FDR Skatepark, but I don’t think the park was ever considered a skatepark in the true sense of a skatepark … it’s more of a skate spot. It’s like your favorite little ditch. You go down and throw a curb block on top of it, but you don’t call it a skatepark, you call it a skate spot, and it just keeps changing.”¿Steve Faas

“I think the park shows how creative this generation is. It’s fighting the old generation where we just need to do it, we don’t need to ask. We need to make what we want to make the world a better place.”¿Carlos Biaza

The course of American history has caused many changes in not only the world but also in individuals’ lives. FDR Skatepark has also had an impact on both the overall skateboarding scene in this city and in many skaters’ lives.

“FDR Changed the way I thought about skateboarding. It influenced me to move here.”¿Adam “Tex” Young

“It’s part of my lifestyle; I go there a lot skate and rage. It’s like my church.”¿Bud Baum

“It helped me progress as a skateboarder and gave me new ways to express myself on my stunt wood.”¿Joe Peleckis

“The park made me go from skating pure street and ledges to wanting to skate mostly transitions and go fast. FDR helps you figure out your purpose and the true meaning of skating.”¿Lou Rogai

“It brought me back to real skateboarding¿not just going out and trying the best trick ’cause you want to be the best, but going out and having a blast with a bunch of people, no matter what trick you’re doing.”¿J.P. Jakel

“I basically skate more now because of the park.”¿Andrew Clark

“When I was in college it was the only place I had to skate. I’d go up there almost every day and skate. It was sick.”¿Rob Erickson

“It has made me more lazy as far as road-tripping. It made a Philly vert scene. Before the park Philly wasn’t a place for a vert guy. It made Philly more like home.”¿Dan Tag

Life in the U.S. today is very different from when it started more than 200 years ago, but it’s still guided by the same principles that started it. The scene at FDR Skatepark has also changed drastically in five years, but the one thing that has remained constant is people skateboarding.

“The atmosphere at the park is totally how a park should be¿complete mayhem.”¿Carlos Biaza

“Philadelphia’s skate scene is totally different than California’s; California almost bums you out on skating. When I came to skate in Philadelphia, nobody I skated with cared if you were doing a frontside grind or a 540 frontside grind; everybody was stoked on skating. It got me back into skateboarding a lot, to where I had fun again.”¿J.P. Jakel

“FDR lends itself to a certain style of skating. I guess the best word to describe it is ‘flow.’”¿Joe Peleckis

“There’s a group of people down there pushing you to learn new things, always pushing the envelope a little bit.”¿Clive Bagnall

“Now it’s just a crazy, chaotic, chicken arena. Not only are you coming out of a trick, but you’ve got to look both ways before you get to it. And while you’re in the air, you have to look both ways to see who you’re going to land on. If they’re small enough to plow through, you’re all right.”¿Steve Faas

“You got every generation down there, every freak in the book. The only thing Philly was known for was Love Park, but now you’ve got a whole new scene.”¿Rick Charnoski

“Skateboarders took action and built what they wanted to skate. It’s not the greatest thing in the world, but man, it’s free, you don’t have to wear pads, and you can go hang out with all your friends and have the greatest time in your life. It’s total freedom.”¿Rob Erickson

History is usually made up of stories that have an outcome that changes the path of people’s lives. There are so many stories from FDR, I could fill a book with them. So I’ve chosen a couple of funny ones for you to savor.

“I remember coming down of the big wallride and there was a little Rollerblader kid in my way. I sort of leaned into him and caught the kid on the chin with my shoulder, basically knocking him out, and I just kept skating. I wasn’t trying to kill the kid, I guess that kind of thing happens. But I didn’t feel bad, that’s for sure.”¿Clive Bagnall

“One day George caught a small dove and named it Joseph. He said he loved Joseph so much, and I said I loved Joseph, too. Joseph had a bum wing, so we would take him around on a leash. Everybody loved Joseph so much. Finally, we took Joseph to the doctor. We raised the money and fixed his wing, and he flew away. Joseph was gone.”¿Dan Tag

“One cold day I walked over by the vert ramp, and there were a bunch of kids about eight years old with a fire in a metal trash can. They were throwing stuff at it, knocking it over, raging like maniacs.”¿Andrew Clark

“One time this man and his son where standing next to the vert ramp, and I asked them to move ’cause I could hit them if my board flew off. Next run my board almost hit his son, and the guy got in my face, telling me that I disrespected his son, and that he was going to make a call and have ten Italians with baseball bats come down and beat me, and that they would find my body in the weeds.”¿Adam “Tex” Young

America started with a revolutionary movement that freed its people from their oppressors. The people wanted to build a democratic nation where they could make their own laws and decisions. To build such a state was not easy; America has suffered wars with other countries, civil wars, and assassinations. Democracy is not easy to achieve or maintain.

What we know as FDR Skatepark today also started with a revolution, and the more it grew, the more it had to suffer. Unfortunately, FDR has also seen its share of civil wars and assassinations. It is not a democracy and never was intended to be one. These were just steps that had to be taken to achieve the ultimate goal: skateboarding.The following are opinions, stories, and feelings from veterans of these wars and conflicts.

“More got done, and it seemed that things kind of got out of hand¿not like before when everybody helped, and everrybody had a say in what was going to be built.”¿Todd Heyer

“A project can have conflicts when everyone is being paid money to work on it, but here’s a project where no one is supposed to get paid. The reward is the finished product. That puts even greater pressure on what the finished product will be and whose interests it will meet.”¿Joe Peleckis

“It shows what can happen when you get a group of people together who have a common goal. I mean come on, we’ve just skateboarders. None of us were pro or even had a bunch of money, but look at what we made. By the same token, with all the crap that happened, you realize it takes making compromises for people to work together. It’s tough¿one difference of opinion can turn into a bee’s nest of bullshit.”¿Clive Bagnall

“A memorable building experience was going down to the park the day after the Fourth of July and seeing what had happened to the CIA pool coping and the brick coping on the bunker. What kind of skater would destroy pool coping? That doesn’t seem very stable or balanced to me.”¿Steve Faas

“One day I met this guy who tried to hustle me for donations, saying, ‘Come on, man, I built the park.’ Knowing how much my friends had contributed to this place, I deduced this guy was a kook, taking personal credit for what was obviously a collaborative effort.”¿Joe Peleckis

“You got all these heads who weren’t interested in learning the big tricks, they weren’t interested in learning how to grind the gnarly shit. They just wanted to do what they’ve done all their lives¿carve poopy stuff. Unfortunately, they had people in high places who gave them money, and they built the same stuff they’ve always had, instead of pushing the new boundaries and building the terrain you never get unless you build it yourself.”¿Carlos Biaza

FDR Skatepark is a living, breathing entity that continues to grow. No matter what time of day or night, there is usually a skater there, donating dreams, urethane, sweat, and blood. I can only hope that FDR Skatepark will continue to grow and prosper as it has in the last couple years. I also have faith in the fact that skaters will continue to colonize new lands.See you there.

made me more lazy as far as road-tripping. It made a Philly vert scene. Before the park Philly wasn’t a place for a vert guy. It made Philly more like home.”¿Dan Tag

Life in the U.S. today is very different from when it started more than 200 years ago, but it’s still guided by the same principles that started it. The scene at FDR Skatepark has also changed drastically in five years, but the one thing that has remained constant is people skateboarding.

“The atmosphere at the park is totally how a park should be¿complete mayhem.”¿Carlos Biaza

“Philadelphia’s skate scene is totally different than California’s; California almost bums you out on skating. When I came to skate in Philadelphia, nobody I skated with cared if you were doing a frontside grind or a 540 frontside grind; everybody was stoked on skating. It got me back into skateboarding a lot, to where I had fun again.”¿J.P. Jakel

“FDR lends itself to a certain style of skating. I guess the best word to describe it is ‘flow.’”¿Joe Peleckis

“There’s a group of people down there pushing you to learn new things, always pushing the envelope a little bit.”¿Clive Bagnall

“Now it’s just a crazy, chaotic, chicken arena. Not only are you coming out of a trick, but you’ve got to look both ways before you get to it. And while you’re in the air, you have to look both ways to see who you’re going to land on. If they’re small enough to plow through, you’re all right.”¿Steve Faas

“You got every generation down there, every freak in the book. The only thing Philly was known for was Love Park, but now you’ve got a whole new scene.”¿Rick Charnoski

“Skateboarders took action and built what they wanted to skate. It’s not the greatest thing in the world, but man, it’s free, you don’t have to wear pads, and you can go hang out with all your friends and have the greatest time in your life. It’s total freedom.”¿Rob Erickson

History is usually made up of stories that have an outcome that changes the path of people’s lives. There are so many stories from FDR, I could fill a book with them. So I’ve chosen a couple of funny ones for you to savor.

“I remember coming down of the big wallride and there was a little Rollerblader kid in my way. I sort of leaned into him and caught the kid on the chin with my shoulder, basically knocking him out, and I just kept skating. I wasn’t trying to kill the kid, I guess that kind of thing happens. But I didn’t feel bad, that’s for sure.”¿Clive Bagnall

“One day George caught a small dove and named it Joseph. He said he loved Joseph so much, and I said I loved Joseph, too. Joseph had a bum wing, so we would take him around on a leash. Everybody loved Joseph so much. Finally, we took Joseph to the doctor. We raised the money and fixed his wing, and he flew away. Joseph was gone.”¿Dan Tag

“One cold day I walked over by the vert ramp, and there were a bunch of kids about eight years old with a fire in a metal trash can. They were throwing stuff at it, knocking it over, raging like maniacs.”¿Andrew Clark

“One time this man and his son where standing next to the vert ramp, and I asked them to move ’cause I could hit them if my board flew off. Next run my board almost hit his son, and the guy got in my face, telling me that I disrespected his son, and that he was going to make a call and have ten Italians with baseball bats come down and beat me, and that they would find my body in the weeds.”¿Adam “Tex” Young

America started with a revolutionary movement that freed its people from their oppressors. The people wanted to build a democratic nation where they could make their own laws and decisions. To build such a state was not easy; America has suffered wars with other countries, civil wars, and assassinations. Democracy is not easy to achieve or maintain.

What we know as FDR Skatepark today also started with a revolution, and the more it grew, the more it had to suffer. Unfortunately, FDR has also seen its share of civil wars and assassinations. It is not a democracy and never was intended to be one. These were just steps that had to be taken to achieve the ultimate goal: skateboarding.The following are opinions, stories, and feelings from veterans of these wars and conflicts.

“More got done, and it seemed that things kind of got out of hand¿not like before when everybody helped, and everybody had a say in what was going to be built.”¿Todd Heyer

“A project can have conflicts when everyone is being paid money to work on it, but here’s a project where no one is supposed to get paid. The reward is the finished product. That puts even greater pressure on what the finished product will be and whose interests it will meet.”¿Joe Peleckis

“It shows what can happen when you get a group of people together who have a common goal. I mean come on, we’ve just skateboarders. None of us were pro or even had a bunch of money, but look at what we made. By the same token, with all the crap that happened, you realize it takes making compromises for people to work together. It’s tough¿one difference of opinion can turn into a bee’s nest of bullshit.”¿Clive Bagnall

“A memorable building experience was going down to the park the day after the Fourth of July and seeing what had happened to the CIA pool coping and the brick coping on the bunker. What kind of skater would destroy pool coping? That doesn’t seem very stable or balanced to me.”¿Steve Faas

“One day I met this guy who tried to hustle me for donations, saying, ‘Come on, man, I built the park.’ Knowing how much my friends had contributed to this place, I deduced this guy was a kook, taking personal credit for what was obviously a collaborative effort.”¿Joe Peleckis

“You got all these heads who weren’t interested in learning the big tricks, they weren’t interested in learning how to grind the gnarly shit. They just wanted to do what they’ve done all their lives¿carve poopy stuff. Unfortunately, they had people in high places who gave them money, and they built the same stuff they’ve always had, instead of pushing the new boundaries and building the terrain you never get unless you build it yourself.”¿Carlos Biaza

FDR Skatepark is a living, breathing entity that continues to grow. No matter what time of day or night, there is usually a skater there, donating dreams, urethane, sweat, and blood. I can only hope that FDR Skatepark will continue to grow and prosper as it has in the last couple years. I also have faith in the fact that skaters will continue to colonize new lands.See you there.

t had to suffer. Unfortunately, FDR has also seen its share of civil wars and assassinations. It is not a democracy and never was intended to be one. These were just steps that had to be taken to achieve the ultimate goal: skateboarding.The following are opinions, stories, and feelings from veterans of these wars and conflicts.

“More got done, and it seemed that things kind of got out of hand¿not like before when everybody helped, and everybody had a say in what was going to be built.”¿Todd Heyer

“A project can have conflicts when everyone is being paid money to work on it, but here’s a project where no one is supposed to get paid. The reward is the finished product. That puts even greater pressure on what the finished product will be and whose interests it will meet.”¿Joe Peleckis

“It shows what can happen when you get a group of people together who have a common goal. I mean come on, we’ve just skateboarders. None of us were pro or even had a bunch of money, but look at what we made. By the same token, with all the crap that happened, you realize it takes making compromises for people to work together. It’s tough¿one difference of opinion can turn into a bee’s nest of bullshit.”¿Clive Bagnall

“A memorable building experience was going down to the park the day after the Fourth of July and seeing what had happened to the CIA pool coping and the brick coping on the bunker. What kind of skater would destroy pool coping? That doesn’t seem very stable or balanced to me.”¿Steve Faas

“One day I met this guy who tried to hustle me for donations, saying, ‘Come on, man, I built the park.’ Knowing how much my friends had contributed to this place, I deduced this guy was a kook, taking personal credit for what was obviously a collaborative effort.”¿Joe Peleckis

“You got all these heads who weren’t interested in learning the big tricks, they weren’t interested in learning how to grind the gnarly shit. They just wanted to do what they’ve done all their lives¿carve poopy stuff. Unfortunately, they had people in high places who gave them money, and they built the same stuff they’ve always had, instead of pushing the new boundaries and building the terrain you never get unless you build it yourself.”¿Carlos Biaza

FDR Skatepark is a living, breathing entity that continues to grow. No matter what time of day or night, there is usually a skater there, donating dreams, urethane, sweat, and blood. I can only hope that FDR Skatepark will continue to grow and prosper as it has in the last couple years. I also have faith in the fact that skaters will continue to colonize new lands.See you there.