Slam City Jam 1999

Now in its sixth year, Vancouver, British Columbia’s Slam City Jam has become one of the favored contests on the circuit. Not only is the competition stiff and the prize money good, but the prospect of spending the better part of a week in Vancouver during spring draws nearly every member of the skateboard media and hierarchy.

Our magazine was no exception, and due to our hosting the Readers’ Poll Awards, the majority of our staff came along to see the city that so many photographers and skaters return from with stories of endless cement skateparks. Since it was my job to write the contest article, I felt it my duty to attend the entire contest, but I was sure there’d be some time to check out the cement parks with my coworkers.

I’m sure my roomie for the weekend Miki Vuckovich had similar aspirations, but sometimes things just don’t work out like you plan ’em …

Friday

Miki and I rose early from our twelfth-story hotel room with its breathtaking view of downtown Vancouver, the Burrard Inlet, and the ski runs of North Van, which cascade down the western-most Rocky Mountains along the northern coast of the inlet. We ate a hurried breakfast and made our way to the contest arena in a semi-rundown district full of greasy spoons and small shops, where window bars seemed a necessity fifteen minutes east of our Trump-esque sleeping quarters.

We’d spent the better part of the previous day attending a skateboarding industry conference in a meeting room at our fancy hotel. Actually, I attended, Miki ran the thing. And while it proved effective in gathering together members of the skateboard industry to discuss some topics of concern in the tumultuous world of selling skateboards for a living, it left a funny taste in my mouth, and it drained Miki.

So when we arrived at the Pacific Coliseum, and finally got past the usual press-pass hassles, walking into the main hall and seeing the giant skeleton of a vert ramp and a newly complete street course was like taking a breath of fresh air. We stood for a while and soaked it in.

The arena was once home of Vancouver’s National Hockey League franchise the Canucks, but after the team’s 1995 move to the GM Place a bigger, more modern facility downtown the Coliseum’s floor was leveled with concrete so that it might pick up whatever event came to town. With about 16,000 seating capacity, it looked very adequate for a skateboard contest. Maybe over-adequate.

While obtaining press credentials, we learned from event organizers that this year’s Slam City Jam hadn’t received the radio and print support it had in years past. So, when we asked for an attendance estimate for the weekend, we only got a nervous look and a, “We’ll see.”

I sat and watched the construction crew assemble the vert ramp a feat I would liken to building the frame of a medium-sized house. They seemed to be about two-thirds of the way through constructing the 40-foot-wide wooden monster with its opposing channels, roll-ins, and extensions. Glancing at the competitor event schedule we’d been handed upon entering, I deduced that they were running late. My schedule read, “Vert practice all day,” and though I didn’t notice too many vert skaters there yet, I had a feeling they would be slightly less than happy to find out the ramp wouldn’t be skateable until later that afternoon.

After they finished the four-foot hurricane roll-ins, I headed over to the street course, where I saw Miki already shooting photos of some early risers. The course looked big. A wall of staggered eight-foot quarterpipes, banks, channels, and a quarterpipe-to-bank hip butted up to the vert ramp. Dropping in on one of those banks or quarterpipes would take you screaming toward one of several boxes in the middle of the course some quarterpipe-to-banks, others with rails of varying heights and lengths, and one five-foot-high kinked ledge.

After clearing one of the boxes, you’d head up another set of banks and quarterpipes on the r end of the course designed and built to keep the momentum going. Though these obstacles were slightly smaller than their counterparts on the other end of the course, with a deck-to-deck gap and an insanely long rail that required its own ten-foot-high extension, it seemed there was the potential for things to be interesting wherever you turned.

Around 11:00 a.m. I headed up into the stadium seating to get a bird’s-eye view. From the terrace, the plan of the street course seemed even more impressive, and as skaters began to arrive and get warmed up, it became easier to tell which objects would and wouldn’t get serious use. To the credit of the designers, it looked like almost everything on the course was being skated.

By noon there were a couple-dozen vert skaters parked around the still-unfinished ramp. They watched as crews hurriedly set coping and screwed down dozens of four-by-eight-foot sheets of masonite. Street skaters had begun to arrive by the vanload, and by 1:00 p.m. the street course was chaos. There was barely room to stand on the decks of the perimeter quarterpipes, and the floor of the course was only slightly less congested. Team managers risked near-fatal collisions to place stickers on the sides of obstacles, and loose boards shot this way and that. By 3:00 p.m. a couple-dozen photographers and video guys had gotten into the mix, as well as ten or twelve skaters who had no business whatsoever being on the course at a professional skateboard contest, and I found myself wishing they’d get their asses out of the way. A mini street course had been erected off to the side of the vert ramp, and Slam City officials helped misguided skaters find the proper venue.

I spent the majority of the day walking around and watching from different places, my favorite was right against the fence that created a perimeter around the course. While it’s an interesting perspective on the activity of skateboarding to watch from terrace section 23, 50 feet above the contest floor, I still prefer to stand right next to the craziness. Skateboarding is high-speed, and distance doesn’t do it justice.

By 8:00 p.m. street qualifying heats were halfway completed. While skaters like Chris Senn, Rick McCrank, and Willy Santos had prequalified, allowing them to take Friday off, there was such a vast pool of talent that when I needed to I’d literally run to the bathroom and back as not to miss anything. East Coasters Kerry Getz, Mike Maldonado, and Bam Margera were immediate standouts, and their earning high qualifying scores for skating various ledges and rails hinted at the quality of judging, which has risen fast in the past year. The message, street contests should award street skaters and street tricks, not just fall-free runs, early grab 360s, and quarterpipe 540s.

The skating went on until about 10:00 p.m., immediately after which qualifiers were announced. To cap a long day, the Vandals played while prequalified skaters got to get some serious warm-up time.

Miki and I got our things together and headed back to our fancy digs, where we were greeted by stories of parks to the south and west, empty and perfect. I plugged my ears and went to bed.

Saturday

After sleeping way too little, Miki and I again ate some breakfast and headed to the Coliseum. We arrived about an hour later than we had the previous day and were pleased to see exponentially more spectators than on Friday. The word of the contest had apparently gotten out, regardless of the near-complete lack of media support, and hundreds of kids showed up to pay seventeen Canadian dollars to see their favorite pros shred.

My trusty competitor-events schedule told me the day would consist of the first two street semifinal heats, followed by three vert qualifying heats, chased by two more street semis. All would be run in the same fashion as Friday two 45-second runs, best would count. Practice continued until noon, and on the street course it was interesting to see how once the prequalified skaters are thrown into the mix, the bar is raised substantially.

It was Chris Senn’s kind of course the type you can blaze through if you find the right lines and Chris treated it accordingly. Huge quarterpipe-to-quarterpipe transfers, 50-50s on rails, giant kickflips, and crowd-rallying near falls all at Mach ten made me wonder if they shouldn’t just give Chris the trophy and let us all go skate the free public parks around the city.

Chris’s first semifinal run was so amazing, he basically waved his second; right around that time the street contest took an interesting, though painful, turn. In the middle of qualifying, Chad Muska and Chris Senn started to eye a rail that extended from the main street course platform down to the cold cement floor. Unstable, narrow, tall, steep, and unconnected at its base, the rail was sketchy to say the least. To get on it, you had to ollie a three-foot gap, and then ride a 45-degree-angle straight into the ground. For the first 36 hours of contest this particular rail had been steered clear of by almost everyone for those exact reasons.

Muska went first right in the middle of Chris Lambert’s run, by the way and in the process of trying to get into a frontside noseblunt slide, ended up smashing into the ground. The blow would have taken Mike Tyson out, but Muska shook it off, found his board, and headed back up. Next was Senn’s turn to ruin himself, and he did with flying colors, 50-50ing himself right out of the contest. As he lay on the ground, clutching his lower back in agony, the contest dynamic changed dramatically. It was now wide open.

But Chris’ slam didn’t deter Muska, who, on his second attempt, went on to nearly kill himself by missing the rail completely and landing on the side of his head. His head smacked the ground so hard I heard it from the cheap seats. To the relief of announcer Don Bostick, who’d been begging them to stop for ten minutes, the rail session ended promptly thereafter.

As the day continued, it became obvious that a new group of young pros are taking over. Names like Kristian Svitak, Kerry Getz, Alex Chalmers, Ryan “Who The Hell Is Ryan Johnson” Johnson, and Rick McCrank were drawing the some serious applause and throwing down with never-before-seen consistency. And further proof of a new, young generation making itself known was the resurrection of the middle finger held high overhead at the end of one’s run.

The other standout of the day wasn’t so young, but you’d have been hard pressed to find anyone out there having as much fun as Sean Sheffey. Seemingly reborn, he terrorized the course with his own brand of switch-stance insanity. After taking endless runs, the Shef ended the day with a switch ollie into a ten-foot-high bank. The stunt took several attempts to accomplish, and in the course of Sean pounding himself for the crowd, I overheard someone say, “He’s gonna be sore tomorrow.” But when he finally pulled it, just before being mobbed by his peers, the euphoric look on his face seemed to answer, “Yeah, but it was worth it.”

In the middle of this rather hectic schedule, Miki found me and told me to go check out Mike Vallely’s spoken-word performance, which was taking place in the skaters’ lounge area shortly. Not really in the mood for urban poetry, I arrived, took a seat in the back, and hoped it would be over soon. To my surprise, for the next hour or so I watched Mike V. mic clutched in hand, head bowed read poems and talk about his relationship with his dad and his career.

Toward the end of the performance, there was hardly a dry eye in the packed room, and Mike ended to emotional applause. I became so caught up in the stories and memories, I momentarily forgot I was at a skate contest. But schedules as tight as Saturday’s don’t allow for much reflection, and I was soon whisked away in a sea of people trying to push their way to the vert ramp in time for qualifying.

Vert qualifying saw Neal Hendrix,see how once the prequalified skaters are thrown into the mix, the bar is raised substantially.

It was Chris Senn’s kind of course the type you can blaze through if you find the right lines and Chris treated it accordingly. Huge quarterpipe-to-quarterpipe transfers, 50-50s on rails, giant kickflips, and crowd-rallying near falls all at Mach ten made me wonder if they shouldn’t just give Chris the trophy and let us all go skate the free public parks around the city.

Chris’s first semifinal run was so amazing, he basically waved his second; right around that time the street contest took an interesting, though painful, turn. In the middle of qualifying, Chad Muska and Chris Senn started to eye a rail that extended from the main street course platform down to the cold cement floor. Unstable, narrow, tall, steep, and unconnected at its base, the rail was sketchy to say the least. To get on it, you had to ollie a three-foot gap, and then ride a 45-degree-angle straight into the ground. For the first 36 hours of contest this particular rail had been steered clear of by almost everyone for those exact reasons.

Muska went first right in the middle of Chris Lambert’s run, by the way and in the process of trying to get into a frontside noseblunt slide, ended up smashing into the ground. The blow would have taken Mike Tyson out, but Muska shook it off, found his board, and headed back up. Next was Senn’s turn to ruin himself, and he did with flying colors, 50-50ing himself right out of the contest. As he lay on the ground, clutching his lower back in agony, the contest dynamic changed dramatically. It was now wide open.

But Chris’ slam didn’t deter Muska, who, on his second attempt, went on to nearly kill himself by missing the rail completely and landing on the side of his head. His head smacked the ground so hard I heard it from the cheap seats. To the relief of announcer Don Bostick, who’d been begging them to stop for ten minutes, the rail session ended promptly thereafter.

As the day continued, it became obvious that a new group of young pros are taking over. Names like Kristian Svitak, Kerry Getz, Alex Chalmers, Ryan “Who The Hell Is Ryan Johnson” Johnson, and Rick McCrank were drawing the some serious applause and throwing down with never-before-seen consistency. And further proof of a new, young generation making itself known was the resurrection of the middle finger held high overhead at the end of one’s run.

The other standout of the day wasn’t so young, but you’d have been hard pressed to find anyone out there having as much fun as Sean Sheffey. Seemingly reborn, he terrorized the course with his own brand of switch-stance insanity. After taking endless runs, the Shef ended the day with a switch ollie into a ten-foot-high bank. The stunt took several attempts to accomplish, and in the course of Sean pounding himself for the crowd, I overheard someone say, “He’s gonna be sore tomorrow.” But when he finally pulled it, just before being mobbed by his peers, the euphoric look on his face seemed to answer, “Yeah, but it was worth it.”

In the middle of this rather hectic schedule, Miki found me and told me to go check out Mike Vallely’s spoken-word performance, which was taking place in the skaters’ lounge area shortly. Not really in the mood for urban poetry, I arrived, took a seat in the back, and hoped it would be over soon. To my surprise, for the next hour or so I watched Mike V. mic clutched in hand, head bowed read poems and talk about his relationship with his dad and his career.

Toward the end of the performance, there was hardly a dry eye in the packed room, and Mike ended to emotional applause. I became so caught up in the stories and memories, I momentarily forgot I was at a skate contest. But schedules as tight as Saturday’s don’t allow for much reflection, and I was soon whisked away in a sea of people trying to push their way to the vert ramp in time for qualifying.

Vert qualifying saw Neal Hendrix, looking fully recovered from knee surgeries and mysterious back troubles, take two strong runs that would certainly land him in the finals. Paul Zitzer, and Brazilian Sandro Dias also put some quality runs together. No Tony Hawk or Bob Burnquist on Saturday, though, both had prequalified. Tony didn’t even show up until Sunday, due to some previous engagements, including a motion capture session for his soon-to-be-released PlayStation game Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater.

Back at our hotel, I was subjected to more stories of others who’d bailed the contest to skate White Rock, Burnaby, and New Westminster skateparks. I secretly cursed Chris Senn for leaving things wide open on Sunday.

Sunday

Sunday’s girls’ contest attracted more talent than it had the previous year, but there was still a rift between female and male professional skateboarders about the size of the Grand Canyon. With one obvious exception, of course. Elissa Steamer killed it as usual, skating better than one-third of the guys who’d entered, and Rookie skateboards’ Jessie Van Roechoudt also proved her skills were up to par. Hawaii’s Jamie Reyes, the favored runner-up before competition, pulled up lame with an ankle injury that was more than noticeable in her performance.

After the street contest, a girls’ vert competition promptly followed. The total number of girls who could hit coping was small, but a good-sized crowd gathered to watch Jen O’Brien mop up the competition with a series of solid grinds and airs. Without the presence of Cara-Beth Burnside, Jen was a sure bet.

Immediately following the conclusion of the girls’ street contest, the course opened to all street finalists for a four-hour practice session. Then, upon conclusion of the girls’ vert, the guys’ vert semifinals began. Tony Hawk, Andy Macdonald, Bob Burnquist, Sandro Dias, and Mathias Ringstrom put in solid performances and advanced easily on to the finals, which came after an hour of live Biohazard on the main stage. Much to the chagrin of the band’s lead singer, Chad Muska’s impromptu shirt toss proved far more popular than Biohazard’s performance.

Vert finals never seemed to reach any kind of triumphant climax. Bob never really got into Bob-mode, when tricks are decided upon three feet out. Sandro Dias, whose six-foot 540s in the semis looked like an unbeatable weapon, also failed to land a winning run. Even Tony Hawk, who probably could win a contest drunk, couldn’t really put it all together. Which left it up to the Swede, Mathias Ringstrom, who’d won in Tampa in mid March and finished third in Louisville the week before. Mathias stepped up to the next level with a solid, minute-long run that catapulted him to his second victory in three weeks.

Street finals followed vert by about twenty minutes. The day was getting late, and the crowd cheered explosively when the course was cleared for the final two one-minute runs from each of the twenty remaining competitors. While great runs were had by Brian Anderson, Mike Maldonado, Kerry Getz, Eric Koston, Ryan Johnson, Ronnie Creager, Alex Chalmers, Matt Beach, and Ed Templeton, it was the improvisational creativity of Vancouver’s Rick McCrank that once again stole the show. While most employed the tried-and-true preplanned routine, Rick’s huge 360 flips, kickflips, grabs, and grinds seemed to come spontaneously. Even he looked a bit surprised at the end of his final run.

The weekend’s final orders of business were the best trick contests. On the vert ramp, not even Bob’s fakie five-0 fakie flip to fakie could take out the seemingly possessed Colin McKay, who took the cash by landing a nollie flip backside revert, a switch pop shove-it switch noseslide switch shove-it out, and landing on a backside tailslide big-spin. The focus then shifted to the best trick on the street course, which ended up being a duel between Jamie Thomas and Brian Anderson on the sketchy rail that had taken Chris Senn and Chad Muska out the previous day. Jamie andd Brian smashed themselves into the ground for the better part of twenty minutes, until Jamie’s frontside nosegrind finally beat out Brian’s frontside tailslide. Though it could have gone either way, it’s often the last guy to pull his trick who wins, and since Jamie pulled his nosegrind last, Jamie got paid.

After awards were distributed and photos shot, we wearily made our way back to our recharging station in the sky. The weekend had been a full one, and the light sprinkle of rain that had fallen all day long told me I would probably be getting on a plane without any concrete park skating.

What Miki and I won’t endure for skateboarding.

Results

Vert

1. Mathias Ringstrom$5,000

2. Andy Macdonald$2,500

3. Bob Burnquist$1,500

4. Bucky Lasek$1,000

5. Sandro Dias$700

6. Tony Hawk$600

7. Paul Zitzer$500

8. Chris Gentry$400

9. Neal Hendrix$300

10. Jason Ellis$200

Best Trick Vert

Colin McKay$500

Street

1. Rick McCrank$5,000

2. Ronnie Creager$2,500

3. Eric Koston$1,500

4. Matt Beach$1,000

5. Andy Macdonald$700

6. Kerry Getz$600

7. Ed Templeton$500

8. Mike Maldonado$400

9. Jesse Paez$300

10. Christian Brox$200

11. Willy Santos$100

12. Kristian Svitak$100

13. Brian Anderson$100

14. Alex Chalmers$100

15. Ryan Johnson$100

16. Omar Hassan$100

17. Chad Fernandez$100

18. Brian Patch$100

19. Dan Pageau$100

20. Ray Barbee$100

Best Trick Street

Jamie Thomas$500

Women’s Street

1. Elissa Steamer$800

2. Jessie Van Roechoudt$400

3. Michelle Pizel$200

4. Cindy Gorset$100

5. Laura Silva$100

Women’s Vert

1. Jen O’Brien$500

2. Stephanie Hasegaw$300

3. Laura Silva$200

4. Isabelle Ranger

5. Cory Nagel

oking fully recovered from knee surgeries and mysterious back troubles, take two strong runs that would certainly land him in the finals. Paul Zitzer, and Brazilian Sandro Dias also put some quality runs together. No Tony Hawk or Bob Burnquist on Saturday, though, both had prequalified. Tony didn’t even show up until Sunday, due to some previous engagements, including a motion capture session for his soon-to-be-released PlayStation game Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater.

Back at our hotel, I was subjected to more stories of others who’d bailed the contest to skate White Rock, Burnaby, and New Westminster skateparks. I secretly cursed Chris Senn for leaving things wide open on Sunday.

Sunday

Sunday’s girls’ contest attracted more talent than it had the previous year, but there was still a rift between female and male professional skateboarders about the size of the Grand Canyon. With one obvious exception, of course. Elissa Steamer killed it as usual, skating better than one-third of the guys who’d entered, and Rookie skateboards’ Jessie Van Roechoudt also proved her skills were up to par. Hawaii’s Jamie Reyes, the favored runner-up before competition, pulled up lame with an ankle injury that was more than noticeable in her performance.

After the street contest, a girls’ vert competition promptly followed. The total number of girls who could hit coping was small, but a good-sized crowd gathered to watch Jen O’Brien mop up the competition with a series of solid grinds and airs. Without the presence of Cara-Beth Burnside, Jen was a sure bet.

Immediately following the conclusion of the girls’ street contest, the course opened to all street finalists for a four-hour practice session. Then, upon conclusion of the girls’ vert, the guys’ vert semifinals began. Tony Hawk, Andy Macdonald, Bob Burnquist, Sandro Dias, and Mathias Ringstrom put in solid performances and advanced easily on to the finals, which came after an hour of live Biohazard on the main stage. Much to the chagrin of the band’s lead singer, Chad Muska’s impromptu shirt toss proved far more popular than Biohazard’s performance.

Vert finals never seemed to reach any kind of triumphant climax. Bob never really got into Bob-mode, when tricks are decided upon three feet out. Sandro Dias, whose six-foot 540s in the semis looked like an unbeatable weapon, also failed to land a winning run. Even Tony Hawk, who probably could win a contest drunk, couldn’t really put it all together. Which left it up to the Swede, Mathias Ringstrom, who’d won in Tampa in mid March and finished third in Louisville the week before. Mathias stepped up to the next level with a solid, minute-long run that catapulted him to his second victory in three weeks.

Street finals followed vert by about twenty minutes. The day was getting late, and the crowd cheered explosively when the course was cleared for the final two one-minute runs from each of the twenty remaining competitors. While great runs were had by Brian Anderson, Mike Maldonado, Kerry Getz, Eric Koston, Ryan Johnson, Ronnie Creager, Alex Chalmers, Matt Beach, and Ed Templeton, it was the improvisational creativity of Vancouver’s Rick McCrank that once again stole the show. While most employed the tried-and-true preplanned routine, Rick’s huge 360 flips, kickflips, grabs, and grinds seemed to come spontaneously. Even he looked a bit surprised at the end of his final run.

The weekend’s final orders of business were the best trick contests. On the vert ramp, not even Bob’s fakie five-0 fakie flip to fakie could take out the seemingly possessed Colin McKay, who took the cash by landing a nollie flip backside revert, a switch pop shove-it switch noseslide switch shove-it out, and landing on a backside tailslide big-spin. The focus then shifted to the best trick on the street course, which ended up being a duel between Jamie Thomas and Brian Anderson on the sketchy rail that had taken Chris Senn and Chad Muska out the previous day. Jamie and Brian smashed themselves into the ground for the better part of twenty minutes, until Jamie’s frontside nosegrind finally beat out Brian’s frontside tailslide. Though it could have gone either way, it’s often the last guy to pull his trick who wins, and since Jamie pulled his nosegrind last, Jamie got paid.

After awards were distributed and photos shot, we wearily made our way back to our recharging station in the sky. The weekend had been a full one, and the light sprinkle of rain that had fallen all day long told me I would probably be getting on a plane without any concrete park skating.

What Miki and I won’t endure for skateboarding.

Results

Vert

1. Mathias Ringstrom$5,000

2. Andy Macdonald$2,500

3. Bob Burnquist$1,500

4. Bucky Lasek$1,000

5. Sandro Dias$700

6. Tony Hawk$600

7. Paul Zitzer$500

8. Chris Gentry$400

9. Neal Hendrix$300

10. Jason Ellis$200

Best Trick Vert

Colin McKay$500

Street

1. Rick McCrank$5,000

2. Ronnie Creager$2,500

3. Eric Koston$1,500

4. Matt Beach$1,000

5. Andy Macdonald$700

6. Kerry Getz$600

7. Ed Templeton$500

8. Mike Maldonado$400

9. Jesse Paez$300

10. Christian Brox$200

11. Willy Santos$100

12. Kristian Svitak$100

13. Brian Anderson$100

14. Alex Chalmers$100

15. Ryan Johnson$100

16. Omar Hassan$100

17. Chad Fernandez$100

18. Brian Patch$100

19. Dan Pageau$100

20. Ray Barbee$100

Best Trick Street

Jamie Thomas$500

Women’s Street

1. Elissa Steamer$800

2. Jessie Van Roechoudt$400

3. Michelle Pizel$200

4. Cindy Gorset$100

5. Laura Silva$100

Women’s Vert

1. Jen O’Brien$500

2. Stephanie Hasegaw$300

3. Laura Silva$200

4. Isabelle Ranger

5. Cory Nagel

ay. Jamie and Brian smashed themselves into the ground for the better part of twenty minutes, until Jamie’s frontside nosegrind finally beat out Brian’s frontside tailslide. Though it could have gone either way, it’s often the last guy to pull his trick who wins, and since Jamie pulled his nosegrind last, Jamie got paid.

After awards were distributed and photos shot, we wearily made our way back to our recharging station in the sky. The weekend had been a full one, and the light sprinkle of rain that had fallen all day long told me I would probably be getting on a plane without any concrete park skating.

What Miki and I won’t endure for skateboarding.

Results

Vert

1. Mathias Ringstrom$5,000

2. Andy Macdonald$2,500

3. Bob Burnquist$1,500

4. Bucky Lasek$1,000

5. Sandro Dias$700

6. Tony Hawk$600

7. Paul Zitzer$500

8. Chris Gentry$400

9. Neal Hendrix$300

10. Jason Ellis$200

Best Trick Vert

Colin McKay$500

Street

1. Rick McCrank$5,000

2. Ronnie Creager$2,500

3. Eric Koston$1,500

4. Matt Beach$1,000

5. Andy Macdonald$700

6. Kerry Getz$600

7. Ed Templeton$500

8. Mike Maldonado$400

9. Jesse Paez$300

10. Christian Brox$200

11. Willy Santos$100

12. Kristian Svitak$100

13. Brian Anderson$100

14. Alex Chalmers$100

15. Ryan Johnson$100

16. Omar Hassan$100

17. Chad Fernandez$100

18. Brian Patch$100

19. Dan Pageau$100

20. Ray Barbee$100

Best Trick Street

Jamie Thomas$500

Women’s Street

1. Elissa Steamer$800

2. Jessie Van Roechoudt$400

3. Michelle Pizel$200

4. Cindy Gorset$100

5. Laura Silva$100

Women’s Vert

1. Jen O’Brien$500

2. Stephanie Hasegaw$300

3. Laura Silva$200

4. Isabelle Ranger

5. Cory Nagel