Sluggo Pro Spotlight

Is Rob Boyce the complete professional skateboarder?

by Joel Patterson

There are three different types of professional skateboarders.

The first, and most common, are the Passers Through. Making up nearly 90 percent of professional skateboarding’s ranks, they often show up on the scene once it’s reached a steady plateau and proceed to join in the popular terrain and style of the day. In the 1980s they were punk vert skaters, in the early 90s they were baggy-jeaned super-tech street skaters, and now they’re hip-hop handrail destroyers. And while their stay is often short, they’re a big reason skateboarding continues to thrive and progress. They’re like the middle class¿working hard, collecting an average-size paycheck, and hoping beyond all hopes to blend in.

The second group are the Superstars. Comprised of only about seven percent of all pros, this bunch are often paid like NHL bench-warmers (which, by the way, is pretty damn good) and idolized by skateboarding’s great ocean of followers. They have succeeded in connecting the dots of the improbable triangle of fame: ability, image, and hard work. Though they always seem to luck into shoe deals, magazine covers, and second incomes as pro snowboarders, the truth of the matter is, whether genetic or learned, they have achieved a deeper understanding of how the system works. They’re like those people who party the night before the SAT and still get a perfect 1600.

The third group is the most illusive¿they are the Businessmen. It’s hard to estimate the size of this group, because it’s comprised largely of the first two. They are pros of varying talent who happened to be in the right place at the right time with the right amount of money in their checking accounts, or stuffed in their mattresses, or whatever. They own the businesses that employ the trustworthy Passers Through and the canonized Superstars. They pay the salaries of their peers. They pay for the ad space in the magazines that convert Passers Though into Super Stars. They buy the cameras that film the videos that make the whole world sing. You get the idea. If skateboarding was a video game, they’d be the guys who own the arcade.

Rob Boyce, nicknamed Sluggo at sixteen by Vancouver locals who thought he resembled the popular character from the Nancy cartoon strip, knows no cage. He’s one of the very few who moves unimpeded through the three aforementioned categories like a ghost in a 1,000-year-old castle, walking effortlessly through two-foot-thick walls of solid stone. He survived the death of vert in the early 1990s and the Top Ramen dream of early professionaldom. He became a professional snowboarder without losing credibility in the always-skeptical world of skateboarding. He started a business that continues to grow, providing friends and fellow pros with opportunities to make skateboarding their livings, too. He became a stuntman, and a husband, and a father, and the first person to pull a backflip on a skateboard, and the last person to turn his back on a friend.

In an attempt to get a better view of a rare bird, we ditched the usual live interview in a bad restaurant and had the following exchange via e-mail during the entire month of February 2000.

Joel: Did you always get along with all the Vancouver dudes, or was there a time when there was some animosity between you guys?

Sluggo: As far as the Red Dragons go, no major problems. But if we’re talking about Vancouver locals, there’s been plenty of animosity over the years. Mostly just from jealous punks who didn’t have the balls to follow their dreams¿hating on all the Red Dragons, not just me.

You’ve always seemed like the father figure to all the Red Dragon types, yet as far as I understand, you didn’t really participate as heavily as the others in the Red Dragons’ FSU F¿k Shit Up phase, which is a big part of their image. How do you see your role with those guys?

I’m the oldest Red Dragon, and I’ve alwayslayed the role of protector. I never felt a real need to FSU. When they were going through their FSU stage, they were really young¿too young to get in serious trouble with the law. I, on the other hand, would have ended up in jail. I still saw plenty of security guards go down and endless amounts of smashing. I’m the oldest, so I looked out for them a lot more when they were kids, but they’re all businessmen now, so I don’t look at myself as much as a father figure as I do a friend.

Tell me about your childhood. What memories strike you as being the most profound?

As a child I was extremely hyperactive. I fought a lot and saw lots of shit kids shouldn’t see, like insane amounts of domestic and alcohol abuse. From birth to age thirteen it was like living in a war zone. Thank god my mother, brother, and I survived it.

When did you start skating?

In ’86 all my breakdance friends quit breaking and started committing crimes full-time. They used to go to different schools and rip off lockers, so they ended up with countless skateboards and Walkmans. I asked one of my boys if I could get a skate off him, and for a bunch of junk food it was mine. So, I started in ’86.

List your sponsors from first to most recent.

I’ll just list board sponsors for skate and snow. My first deck sponsor was G&S, then Real, and now World Industries. For snowboards it was Skull Skates/Crystal Ocean, the Division 23, and now World Industries.

Are you still a pro snowboarder?

Yes, I get paid to snowboard, but I’m a pro skateboarder first.

When did you start snowboarding?

I started snowboarding in the early 1990s, thanks to a friend of mine named Kevin Williams. I owe so much to that guy¿not just for getting me into snowboarding, but for opening my eyes to what’s really going on. Thanks, Kevin.

How did being a pro snowboarder come about?

I’d been a pro skater for Real for about two years, and vert was dead. Being pro for Real is a lot like collecting pop bottles for a living¿you’re nickel-and-diming it every day. So I was broke, and I was joking with Colin McKay that I should try to become a pro snowboarder to make extra money. He was like, “Yeah, right.” So I bet him I would be a paid pro within one year. I won. Within the year I was getting paid, and the following year I received my first pro-model snowboard with Division 23. To date I’ve had seven signature snowboards.

What did you do to get Division 23 to turn you pro?

It’s all about getting coverage, and I was getting a lot, so they turned me pro and gave me a model.

So you’re sort of living proof that snowboarding is way easier than skating.

No, that’s not true.

Do you think snowboarders respect you because you’re a skateboarder or a great snowboarder?

Do snowboarders respect me?

You tell me! Do you think some see you as a guy who turned pro because he’s a skater with name recognition?

Yeah, that’s what I am! I’ve dropped some big cliffs and stomped some rodeos, but I’m not in the same league as guys like Devun Walsh and Peter Line.

Which pays better, skate or snow?

It depends on how big-time you are. I make about the same to do both. There’s more money in snowboarding, though.

Does your pro-model snowboard sell well?

Like hotcakes, baby!

How about compared to Peter Line’s?

My board probably sells about one for every 1,000 of Peter’s.

Did you learn backflips on a snowboard first?

Yeah, snowboarding was first. They’re really easy on a snowboard.

How long did you try backflips on a skateboard before you pulled one?

I’d say about two weeks before I rode it out.

What’s the trick to doing a backflip on vert?

Commitment. You can’t chicken out halfway through or you’ll land on your head. Also, you have to do it late grab¿early grabs don’t count.

Do you think the backflip is a novelty trick, or, like the 540, will it one day be required learning for vert skaters?

Last week I saw Bucky Lasek land early-grab ones backflips at the Y. And Danny Way can pretty much do them, he just hasn’t committed to the landing. It’s not the hardest trick in the world, it just takes balls.

I know you worked hard on doing a 900. After Tony pulled it, did you stop trying?

I haven’t tried it since Tony landed it. Only a handful of people have any clue how mentally and physically hard the 900 is, so when Tony pulled it that really blew my mind. I have a respect for Tony that is unparalleled.

Does Vancouver have a vert ramp, yet?

We have a couple portable ramps that go up from time to time, but nothing permanent.

I’ve been told that you were raised in gymnastics. What kind of effect has that had on your life?

Gymnastics is the foundation for everything physical or mental I’ve ever accomplished. Without gymnastics I don’t like to think where I’d be today. Thank you, Mom.

How old were you when you started?

I started gymnastics when I was six, and I competed for ten years all over Canada. I still go to gymnastics two or three times a week to stay in shape. Gymnastics is amazing.

Skateboarders are pretty sensitive about training, but when I see you at contests a lot of the time you’re heading off to the gym or just getting back from it. Do you ever get vibed or joked for going to the gym?

I get made fun of by my brother for what I do at the gym, but not for going. I don’t lift weights, I only do cardio training.

Is it true that you’re the most famous Canadian breakdancer?

I am Canadian, and I do breakdance, but I’m not sure I’d say I’m the most famous.

How did you get into breakdancing?

I saw some guys doing a breakdance demo in Victoria when I was about thirteen. So I gave it a try, and it came to me pretty easily because of gymnastics.

Do you still do it?

I still bust out every opportunity I get.

What’s your favorite breaking move?

Windmills have always been my favorite move. They look pretty flashy.

Did any of the other Red Dragons breakdance?

Colin McKay and Moses Itkonen are extremely talented breakers but rarely bust out anymore, because they don’t like to mess up their clothes.

I know you hang out with the Red Dragon guys a lot, but what other skaters have influenced your skating and your life?

Rick Howard had a strong influence on me, because he was the first one from our scene to make it. He was light years ahead of his time. Before Rick it was all Christian Hosoi, Steve Caballero, and Lance Mountain.

Your gymnastic experience, combined with skateboarding and snowboarding, has opened up a whole new future career route for you doing stunts in movies and on TV shows. How did you get into doing stunt work?

Wesley Snipes’ stunt-double Jeff Ward came to Q Branch’s vert ramp two years ago to scout some guys to double characters in this movie, Future Sport. Alex Chalmers and I got cast as doubles for the lead characters. I doubled Dean Cain from Lois & Superman¿he does Ripley’s Believe It Or Not now. It was a lot of skateboarding and trampoline stuff, so it was right up my alley. I was totally amped. We did it every day for about a month straight. It was one of the funnest things I’d ever done. Because of that, Alex and I both got into the stunt union Actra/UBCP.

How does stunt work pay?

One day working on a movie pays the same as one month of skating.

How much money did you make filming Future Sport?

More than I make from a year of skating.

Are you actively seeking more stunt work?

Yeah, I send out resumes and go meet the stunt directors regularly. After skateboarding, that’s all I really want to do. It’s really exciting and different. It keeps you young.

You recently became a father. How did having a baby affect your life?

It gave me a beautiful perfect baby boy and a feeling of pride that can only be appreciated by other parents. It’s made my life even better.

Will you push your kid to be a skateboarder?

No, I won’t push my kid in any one direction. -grab ones backflips at the Y. And Danny Way can pretty much do them, he just hasn’t committed to the landing. It’s not the hardest trick in the world, it just takes balls.

I know you worked hard on doing a 900. After Tony pulled it, did you stop trying?

I haven’t tried it since Tony landed it. Only a handful of people have any clue how mentally and physically hard the 900 is, so when Tony pulled it that really blew my mind. I have a respect for Tony that is unparalleled.

Does Vancouver have a vert ramp, yet?

We have a couple portable ramps that go up from time to time, but nothing permanent.

I’ve been told that you were raised in gymnastics. What kind of effect has that had on your life?

Gymnastics is the foundation for everything physical or mental I’ve ever accomplished. Without gymnastics I don’t like to think where I’d be today. Thank you, Mom.

How old were you when you started?

I started gymnastics when I was six, and I competed for ten years all over Canada. I still go to gymnastics two or three times a week to stay in shape. Gymnastics is amazing.

Skateboarders are pretty sensitive about training, but when I see you at contests a lot of the time you’re heading off to the gym or just getting back from it. Do you ever get vibed or joked for going to the gym?

I get made fun of by my brother for what I do at the gym, but not for going. I don’t lift weights, I only do cardio training.

Is it true that you’re the most famous Canadian breakdancer?

I am Canadian, and I do breakdance, but I’m not sure I’d say I’m the most famous.

How did you get into breakdancing?

I saw some guys doing a breakdance demo in Victoria when I was about thirteen. So I gave it a try, and it came to me pretty easily because of gymnastics.

Do you still do it?

I still bust out every opportunity I get.

What’s your favorite breaking move?

Windmills have always been my favorite move. They look pretty flashy.

Did any of the other Red Dragons breakdance?

Colin McKay and Moses Itkonen are extremely talented breakers but rarely bust out anymore, because they don’t like to mess up their clothes.

I know you hang out with the Red Dragon guys a lot, but what other skaters have influenced your skating and your life?

Rick Howard had a strong influence on me, because he was the first one from our scene to make it. He was light years ahead of his time. Before Rick it was all Christian Hosoi, Steve Caballero, and Lance Mountain.

Your gymnastic experience, combined with skateboarding and snowboarding, has opened up a whole new future career route for you doing stunts in movies and on TV shows. How did you get into doing stunt work?

Wesley Snipes’ stunt-double Jeff Ward came to Q Branch’s vert ramp two years ago to scout some guys to double characters in this movie, Future Sport. Alex Chalmers and I got cast as doubles for the lead characters. I doubled Dean Cain from Lois & Superman¿he does Ripley’s Believe It Or Not now. It was a lot of skateboarding and trampoline stuff, so it was right up my alley. I was totally amped. We did it every day for about a month straight. It was one of the funnest things I’d ever done. Because of that, Alex and I both got into the stunt union Actra/UBCP.

How does stunt work pay?

One day working on a movie pays the same as one month of skating.

How much money did you make filming Future Sport?

More than I make from a year of skating.

Are you actively seeking more stunt work?

Yeah, I send out resumes and go meet the stunt directors regularly. After skateboarding, that’s all I really want to do. It’s really exciting and different. It keeps you young.

You recently became a father. How did having a baby affect your life?

It gave me a beautiful perfect baby boy and a feeling of pride that can only be appreciated by other parents. It’s made my life even better.

Will you push your kid to be a skateboarder?

No, I won’t push my kid in any one direction. I’ll let him experience all kinds of things and allow him to choose his own path.

What do you like least about your personality?

When I was younger I’d snap a lot at stupid shit. I’ve curbed that, though. So, I guess I’d say my anger.

What do you think about World Industries’ and Steve Rocco’s effect on skateboarding? He’s definitely had positive impact in the form of starting companies that have produced so many amazing skateboarders. Do you see any negative aspects of what World has done?

I feel Steve Rocco shook up skateboarding a lot in the early 90s¿a well-deserved shake-up, too. It kept the industry on its toes. The advertising and marketing of skateboarding was stale, and Steve gave it a breath of fresh air. He made kids look forward to World’s ads and products. Doing the things he did, you can’t expect everyone to like you, but like it or not, it worked. He took some serious chances and they paid off. He’s laughing now, playing on Lanai a Hawaiian island where Steve owns a home. Some people are always going to be jealous of success. Screw them.

Earlier you mentioned that the Red Dragons aren’t kids anymore, they’re businessmen now. You guys seem to be following Steve’s success as a businessperson. Talk about your ventures in the business world.

Three and a half years ago, Colin McKay, Peter Sullivan, and I opened a skate shop in Vancouver called RDS, which stands for Red Dragon Skates. Then two years ago we had the opportunity to start distributing DC shoes in Canada. So, to do that we opened up a distribution company called Centre. Since then Centre’s also started to distribute Girl, Chocolate, Fourstar, World Industries, Alien Workshop, Habitat, 411, Destructo, and Red Dragon Clothing. We have a Centre Distribution on the east and west coasts of Canada, and they’ve both been really successful.

When we opened the shop, we found we were selling more RDS clothing than anything else in the store. So we made Red Dragon Clothing a whole new separate company that Moses runs out of a warehouse in Vancouver. He distributes the clothing all over the world. He shares the warehouse with Rick McCrank’s wheel company, Momentum. Just recently Rick Howard and Mike Carroll started Lakai skate shoes, and they said we could distribute them. But Centre already had its hands full, so we started a new distribution called Supra just to distribute Lakai.

What do you attribute your success as a businessman to?

Having money to invest at the right time, and to my partner Peter Sullivan, who’s a workaholic.

Why, in your opinion, is skateboarding so big right now?

TV, Tony Hawk, video games, and fingerboards.

What pisses you off about professional skateboarders?

Not all of them are this way, but some pro skaters feel skateboarding owes them something. Especially guys at the end of their career who have nothing to show for it.

In your opinion, what importance do contests play in skateboarding?

I feel videos and magazines are more important than contests, because they showcase progression. Skateboarding isn’t about who’s the best.

What’s it about then?

Most of the people who skateboard aren’t pro or even sponsored, so I’d say it’s about having fun.

How much longer do you have as a pro skater?

I’m pretty sure I’ve got another ten good years left. Maybe fifteen.

Are there any moments that stand out as milestones in your skateboarding career?

Yeah, my first photo in a magazine, my first 540, my first pro model on Real, touring with Tommy Guerrero and Jim Thiebaud in Europe and on the East Coast. Quitting Real was hard, I had so much Real pride. Then getting on World, opening RDS and Centre Distribution, landing the first backflip on vert, and getting the cover of TWS. Finally, making a run in the Invert Contest ’99.

Do you ever wish you’d gone a different direction in life?

I wouldn’t change a single thing I’ve ever done¿good or bad, nothing.

What are your top three priorities in life?

Provide for my family, love and be loved by my friends, and be a good person..

Would you like to thank anyone?

Extra special love to my wife Geraldine and son Liam. All my love to: my mom Lyn Boyce, Dave Boyce, Mike Boyce, Gran Granda White, Gordon, Noreen, Cameron, Kyle, Roberta, Jeremy, Jessica, Ken, Larry, Sean Kearns, Colin McKay, Ami, Jordon, Felicia, Haron, Ky, Marchello, Alvi, Danny Way, Jason Ellis, Kris Markovich, PD, Pam and Marcy, Bob, Rosa, Jody Morris, Moses Itkonen, Sam Gabay, Ben Nichol, Sam Devlin, Dori, Carrol, Karen, Dark Mark, Dan, Louise and Peter Sullivan, John Munro, Sid Clark, Jimbo, Kareem Campbell, Max Schaaf, Shrugy, Ben Chibber, Mike Mitchell, Ernie Jackson, Scott Nickleson, Jerry and Lynn McKay, Lisa, Alycia, BK, God, James Ford, Corby, Steve and Phil Calvert, Kevin Harris, Phil, Kelly, The Wildcats, level, Westbeach, Vert, Boarding House, Source, Underworld, fulltilt, Circle, Plush, DMBC, Suds, John Ramondo, Troy Blackmore, Papa Nic Parker, Neil Edgeworth, Stacey Ricketts, Steve Rocco, Frank Messman, Scott at World, Andy Boniface, Seymour Mountain, Don at United Clothing, Whistler locals, Red Dragons, Devun Walsh, Brian at Dragon, Mike Pragnel, Miranda, Dionne, 57, the Falkner twins, Graham at Family, Dereck Kettela, Dano, Shin, Proctor, Wayne, Morri, Young, Garret, Juddah, Christian B., World Industries, Momentum Wheels, Fury Trucks, Mounting Machines, United Clothing, Dragon Optics, Switch Bindings, and RDS Skate Supply.

l let him experience all kinds of things and allow him to choose his own path.

What do you like least about your personality?

When I was younger I’d snap a lot at stupid shit. I’ve curbed that, though. So, I guess I’d say my anger.

What do you think about World Industries’ and Steve Rocco’s effect on skateboarding? He’s definitely had positive impact in the form of starting companies that have produced so many amazing skateboarders. Do you see any negative aspects of what World has done?

I feel Steve Rocco shook up skateboarding a lot in the early 90s¿a well-deserved shake-up, too. It kept the industry on its toes. The advertising and marketing of skateboarding was stale, and Steve gave it a breath of fresh air. He made kids look forward to World’s ads and products. Doing the things he did, you can’t expect everyone to like you, but like it or not, it worked. He took some serious chances and they paid off. He’s laughing now, playing on Lanai a Hawaiian island where Steve owns a home. Some people are always going to be jealous of success. Screw them.

Earlier you mentioned that the Red Dragons aren’t kids anymore, they’re businessmen now. You guys seem to be following Steve’s success as a businessperson. Talk about your ventures in the business world.

Three and a half years ago, Colin McKay, Peter Sullivan, and I opened a skate shop in Vancouver called RDS, which stands for Red Dragon Skates. Then two years ago we had the opportunity to start distributing DC shoes in Canada. So, to do that we opened up a distribution company called Centre. Since then Centre’s also started to distribute Girl, Chocolate, Fourstar, World Industries, Alien Workshop, Habitat, 411, Destructo, and Red Dragon Clothing. We have a Centre Distribution on the east and west coasts of Canada, and they’ve both been really successful.

When we opened the shop, we found we were selling more RDS clothing than anything else in the store. So we made Red Dragon Clothing a whole new separate company that Moses runs out of a warehouse in Vancouver. He distributes the clothing all over the world. He shares the warehouse with Rick McCrank’s wheel company, Momentum. Just recently Rick Howard and Mike Carroll started Lakai skate shoes, and they said we could distribute them. But Centre already had its hands full, so we started a new distribution called Supra just to distribute Lakai.

What do you attribute your success as a businessman to?

Having money to invest at the right time, and to my partner Peter Sullivan, who’s a workaholic.

Why, in your opinion, is skateboarding so big right now?

TV, Tony Hawk, video games, and fingerboards.

What pisses you off about professional skateboarders?

Not all of them are this way, but some pro skaters feel skateboarding owes them something. Especially guys at the end of their career who have nothing to show for it.

In your opinion, what importance do contests play in skateboarding?

I feel videos and magazines are more important than contests, because they showcase progression. Skateboarding isn’t about who’s the best.

What’s it about then?

Most of the people who skateboard aren’t pro or even sponsored, so I’d say it’s about having fun.

How much longer do you have as a pro skater?

I’m pretty sure I’ve got another ten good years left. Maybe fifteen.

Are there any moments that stand out as milestones in your skateboarding career?

Yeah, my first photo in a magazine, my first 540, my first pro model on Real, touring with Tommy Guerrero and Jim Thiebaud in Europe and on the East Coast. Quitting Real was hard, I had so much Real pride. Then getting on World, opening RDS and Centre Distribution, landing the first backflip on vert, and getting the cover of TWS. Finally, making a run in the Invert Contest ’99.

Do you ever wish you’d gone a different direction in life?

I wouldn’t change a single thing I’ve ever done¿good or bad, nothing.

What are your top three priorities in life?

Provide for my family, love and be loved by my friends, and be a good person.

Would you like to thank anyone?

Extra special love to my wife Geraldine and son Liam. All my love to: my mom Lyn Boyce, Dave Boyce, Mike Boyce, Gran Granda White, Gordon, Noreen, Cameron, Kyle, Roberta, Jeremy, Jessica, Ken, Larry, Sean Kearns, Colin McKay, Ami, Jordon, Felicia, Haron, Ky, Marchello, Alvi, Danny Way, Jason Ellis, Kris Markovich, PD, Pam and Marcy, Bob, Rosa, Jody Morris, Moses Itkonen, Sam Gabay, Ben Nichol, Sam Devlin, Dori, Carrol, Karen, Dark Mark, Dan, Louise and Peter Sullivan, John Munro, Sid Clark, Jimbo, Kareem Campbell, Max Schaaf, Shrugy, Ben Chibber, Mike Mitchell, Ernie Jackson, Scott Nickleson, Jerry and Lynn McKay, Lisa, Alycia, BK, God, James Ford, Corby, Steve and Phil Calvert, Kevin Harris, Phil, Kelly, The Wildcats, level, Westbeach, Vert, Boarding House, Source, Underworld, fulltilt, Circle, Plush, DMBC, Suds, John Ramondo, Troy Blackmore, Papa Nic Parker, Neil Edgeworth, Stacey Ricketts, Steve Rocco, Frank Messman, Scott at World, Andy Boniface, Seymour Mountain, Don at United Clothing, Whistler locals, Red Dragons, Devun Walsh, Brian at Dragon, Mike Pragnel, Miranda, Dionne, 57, the Falkner twins, Graham at Family, Dereck Kettela, Dano, Shin, Proctor, Wayne, Morri, Young, Garret, Juddah, Christian B., World Industries, Momentum Wheels, Fury Trucks, Mounting Machines, United Clothing, Dragon Optics, Switch Bindings, and RDS Skate Supply.

es in life?

Provide for my family, love and be loved by my friends, and be a good person.

Would you like to thank anyone?

Extra special love to my wife Geraldine and son Liam. All my love to: my mom Lyn Boyce, Dave Boyce, Mike Boyce, Gran Granda White, Gordon, Noreen, Cameron, Kyle, Roberta, Jeremy, Jessica, Ken, Larry, Sean Kearns, Colin McKay, Ami, Jordon, Felicia, Haron, Ky, Marchello, Alvi, Danny Way, Jason Ellis, Kris Markovich, PD, Pam and Marcy, Bob, Rosa, Jody Morris, Moses Itkonen, Sam Gabay, Ben Nichol, Sam Devlin, Dori, Carrol, Karen, Dark Mark, Dan, Louise and Peter Sullivan, John Munro, Sid Clark, Jimbo, Kareem Campbell, Max Schaaf, Shrugy, Ben Chibber, Mike Mitchell, Ernie Jackson, Scott Nickleson, Jerry and Lynn McKay, Lisa, Alycia, BK, God, James Ford, Corby, Steve and Phil Calvert, Kevin Harris, Phil, Kelly, The Wildcats, level, Westbeach, Vert, Boarding House, Source, Underworld, fulltilt, Circle, Plush, DMBC, Suds, John Ramondo, Troy Blackmore, Papa Nic Parker, Neil Edgeworth, Stacey Ricketts, Steve Rocco, Frank Messman, Scott at World, Andy Boniface, Seymour Mountain, Don at United Clothing, Whistler locals, Red Dragons, Devun Walsh, Brian at Dragon, Mike Pragnel, Miranda, Dionne, 57, the Falkner twins, Graham at Family, Dereck Kettela, Dano, Shin, Proctor, Wayne, Morri, Young, Garret, Juddah, Christian B., World Industries, Momentum Wheels, Fury Trucks, Mounting Machines, United Clothing, Dragon Optics, Switch Bindings, and RDS Skate Supply.