“A Film About The Birth Of The Now,” the tag line accompanying the Dogtown And Z-Boys movie poster says it all. On April 26, 2002, Sony Pictures will unveil the much-anticipated movie–documenting the rise of surf/skate culture in and around Santa Monica and Venice Beach, California during the 70s–in a nationwide release. Rush to movie theaters to spend your hard-earned greenbacks, or if you need a taste of what’s to come, visit sonypictures.com to sneak a peek of the flick’s trailer.

On the subject of Dogtown, Tony Alva was featured in a 28-page mini book entitled The Mad Dog Chronicles. Conceived by Fresh Jive’s creator Rick Klotz, The Chronicles features an interview with T.A. accompanied by classic Wynn Miller photos–some of which have never been published. The book, which was first seen at February’s ASR Trade Show in Long Beach, California, was a precursor to Fresh Jive’s Emulsion Project in Tokyo, Japan in May 2002.

The Washington Street Skatepark project in San Diego, California will once again commence construction. After being shut down two years ago, Ken Lewis of Hanger Eighteen Skate Supply spearheaded the efforts to have the Washington Street project live on to see another day. After months of meeting after meeting, the last piece of red tape was finally cut. Cement pouring resumed on March 12, 2002 for the 8,000-square-foot skatepark.

The concrete work will be handled by local volunteers, experienced concrete masons, and members of California Skateparks–the same people who built the public Fontana skatepark. The park is scheduled to open by June 1, 2002 and as of now there isn’t any special event on the calendar signifying the opening of San Diego’s own version of Burnside.

Although admission to the facility will be free, the park is going to be run by volunteer attendants. Lights are in the future plans for the Washington Street park, but until then, the hours will be dawn to dusk–or whenever the person with the keys gets there to open the park. The nonprofit organization that runs the park is set up like a social club–you must become a member. Membership will be as simple as signing a waiver. For any additional information about the Washington Street project, check out hangereighteenskatesupply.com.

Frank Gerwer is the latest skater added to the Anti-Hero pro roster. He joins John Cardiel, Tony Trujillo, Tim Upson, Julien Stranger, and Peter Hewitt on one of the gnarliest tranny teams ever. Look for Frank and the rest of the terrorizers in the next Anti-Hero video. No word on a release date yet.

Speaking of videos, Real skateboards released a video highlighting its am squad this past April. Recipe For Disasterchronicles the real-life adventures of Real’s amateurs J.T. Aultz, Damien Bravo, Chris Trembley, Peter Ramondetta, and Darrell Stanton traveling throughout the Southwest. Real’s press release stated that Recipe For Disaster will be the first in a series of short videos set for release by the NorCal skateboard company–stay tuned.

Scott Bourne has begun work on a new project, Death skateboards. So far Death has released three pro models for Scott that are now available–each come with a Death/Sessions poster of Mr. Bourne.

Arcade skateboards has announced that SAD is no longer riding for the San Diego company. In fact, SAD is apparently M.I.A. somewhere in the greater Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area. SAD, if you read this, Arcade misses you and loves you like a brother. With a departure come arrivals. Arcade has picked up a fiery Washingtonian named Casey Rigney and leaping Brazian Andre Genovesi–both will appear in Who? a new video by Arcade. Featuring main parts from Bryan London, Adelmo Jr., and Casey, the video will also have cameos from the rest of Arcade’s roster. Meanwhile Joey Brezinski, Daniel Haney, Malcolm Watson, J.P. Jadeed, Rodney Torres, Steve Hernandez, and Andre Genovesi are all currently stockpiling footage for Arcade’s full-length video to follow the promo.

News out of Giant’s headquarters says that Tosh Townend has entered the pro ranks for Element. Tosh is currently recovering from reconstructive ankle surgery and should be out wrecking spots on his new ankle as you read this. P.J. Ladd has been busy filming for Boston’s Coliseum Shop video P.J. Ladd’s Wonderful Horrible Life–should be in shops by the time you read this. In related movie news, Bam Margera has been editing his latest project, Haggard. The movie is due out before the release of the Jackass movie, which will begin filming soon. Element rider Bill Pepper is celebrating his tenth year as a team member, and Natas KaupasSMA classic original panther graphic is currently offered by Element.

Keep an eye out for Black Label’s latest video project, Black Out. Featuring Jim Gagne, Kristian Svitak, Jason Adams, and newly annointed pros Adam Alfaro, Ragdoll, Patrick Melcher, and Ben Gilley along the rest of Label’s team.

New Deal’s Kenny Reed has a pro shoe for I-Path–appropriately named “The Traveller,” it’s due out soon. Congratulations to fellow Dealer Ricky Oyola–he’s tied the knot with his girlfriend Sheri. Keep an eye out for New Deal’s video Seven Year Glitch starring the entire team.

DC riders Colin McKay, Danny Way, and Jason Ellis went to a Linkin Park show at L.A.’s House Of Blues. The show was organized by a group of L.A. area high school kids to benefit TrinityKids Care–the first pediatric hospice in L.A. County. The kids at the show went berserk over the free handouts of shoe certificates, T-shirts, hats, and stickers. Danny and Colin had sore hands after signing dozens of autographs, but stated that the evening was a lot of fun.

Think skateboards’ Alysson Castro is no longer representing Airwalk shoes. No news on a new footwear sponsor for Alysson as of press time.

Etnies has put the infamous Sal 23s back on skate-shop shelves. Back in the early 90s, Sal Barbier’s pro model was one of the best skate shoes around–you couldn’t beat the gum-rubber soul, suede upper, and the embroidered number 23.

The Autobahn Wheel Company team has added some fresh talent to its lineup. Satva Leung, Andre Genovesi, Matt Dove, and Brian Hoard all roll with Autobahn urethane. Check out autobahnwheelco.com.

A Long Time Coming

Mike Vallely gets his own brand.

He’s tried before, but it’s never worked out. Mike Vallely, like so many pros in the past three decades, has wanted his own company for almost as long as he’s been pro. TV failed, Transit failed, and others never even got off the ground–all for different reasons. It’s been a tough battle for a guy who’s been a household name among skaters since 1987, but Mike V.’s finally getting his chance.

With the success of his Accel. wheel brand, Mike believes this is the right time to launch his own board brand, too. Giant Skateboard Distribution–which also distributes Mike’s current board sponsor, Black Label–is backing Vallely Skateboards, and the brand will launch this spring with a line of nine boards–three Mike V. pro models, and six logo decks.

As a Black Label pro for the past two and a half years, Mike’s been laying the groundwork for Vallely Skateboards by skating hard and promoting his sponsors the only way he knows how–by going on the road and skating everywhere. The company will reflect Mike’s “skate-everything” attitude, and he says he’ll offer a range of board designs to address all types of skaters and terrain–everything from mini decks and popular shapes to longboards.

He believes that most companies define themselves too tightly and that skateboarding needs more brands focused on everything that skateboarding is, rather than what the company or its team isn’t.

“Now’s the time, and I’m the guy to do it,” he says. Not one to mince words, you can be sure he means it. A guy who’s taken his share of spills in a fifteen-year pro career, it’s nice to see him finally get up for good.–Miki Vuckovich

Corrections

In the May 2002 issue, we mislabeled the photos in the Beast Of The East article. Mike Brennan handled the bluntslide while Joe Buffalo nailed the backside Smith. Sorry, guys, we got the names mixed up.

r, Black Label–is backing Vallely Skateboards, and the brand will launch this spring with a line of nine boards–three Mike V. pro models, and six logo decks.

As a Black Label pro for the past two and a half years, Mike’s been laying the groundwork for Vallely Skateboards by skating hard and promoting his sponsors the only way he knows how–by going on the road and skating everywhere. The company will reflect Mike’s “skate-everything” attitude, and he says he’ll offer a range of board designs to address all types of skaters and terrain–everything from mini decks and popular shapes to longboards.

He believes that most companies define themselves too tightly and that skateboarding needs more brands focused on everything that skateboarding is, rather than what the company or its team isn’t.

“Now’s the time, and I’m the guy to do it,” he says. Not one to mince words, you can be sure he means it. A guy who’s taken his share of spills in a fifteen-year pro career, it’s nice to see him finally get up for good.–Miki Vuckovich

Corrections

In the May 2002 issue, we mislabeled the photos in the Beast Of The East article. Mike Brennan handled the bluntslide while Joe Buffalo nailed the backside Smith. Sorry, guys, we got the names mixed up.