Ryan Bobier

Where do you want to take this interview? What do you want to let the average kid know about Ryan Bobier?

I don't know. I'm not the average kid.

Well then I'm going to have to take this thing back a couple of steps. Without even thinking about the money you receive to skateboard, what keeps you riding that thing?

Uh … I don't really know.

Would you still be skating if you weren't in the position you are today or even making a bit of change off of it?

Yeah! Well I'd probably be in college, but I'd still skate when I had the time to skate. I'd be working a nine-to-five and all that shit.

You're still very young but seem to have been around for while. When was the first time we really saw you in a video?

The first one came out when I was in junior high–eighth grade.

Was the balance between getting through school and being a skateboarder on Zero tough to do?

Yeah, at times, because with Zero, people were coming and going and things were changing, and I was trying to just roll with it. All the while I was trying to just be a kid and gradually go into high school. So basically I went to high school for two years, and it came down to starting Dying To Live and I had to get serious. So I started a homeschool-type program and kinda took off a year and tried to do schoolwork whenever I could. I was traveling so much working on that video.

Was there a period of time where it was rough for you?

Filming for the video?

Yeah.

F–k yeah! You know that! I remember for a while I was going out filming and shit just wasn't going my way. I guess I could blame that on school. I was trying to grow up. I stuck with skating because it was what I loved and it was such a great opportunity. At the same time I was growing up with all these other kids who didn't have shit going on.

I mean we all started skating in the beginning for the same reasons. As time went on people still loved skating, but faded away because they had to do what they had to do just to get by. I stuck with skating because that is what I had going on. At one point it was kinda hard for me to figure out what I was doing. Like, “Is skating for a living really what I want to do? Do I want to take this thing seriously, or am I just wasting these people's time?” I was rolling out with you every day.

Did you think you were wasting my time?

Yeah, because we were rolling out with these people who were obviously on a different level at that time. I saw that and was just like, “Damn.” It would make sense that I'd be at that level, having come out with video parts and being on Zero for that long, but it just wasn't the time.

I stuck with you through it all though, right?

Hell yeah! Doggs!

So who do you owe your nubile skating career to?

Lee Dogg.

No.

Well, I don't know. I don't know if you can say you really owe your career to anyone. You mean besides what you do for yourself?

Yeah. Who helped you out the most?

I'm saying probably Jamie (Thomas) helped me out the most. He stuck with me forever.

That's bullshit! Wrong answer! I had your back the most.

Look, you're not the guy who was in the position to be like, “Okay, we're through with you.”

Says who? Anyway, toward the end you started picking up the pace as the video deadline drew near. Do you feel it works better for you when there's a little pressure on you?

I don't know if I do. It was a hard point because it was past the point of changing what I was able to do, and I wasn't trying to walk away with nothing for a video part. I knew it wasn't going toe what I wanted, and I saw all these other people like Lindsey (Robertson) and Jon Allie breaking it off. I just had to be like, “Let it ride.” It just wasn't going to be how I wanted it to be.

Did you want to be Superman?

Mentally I was like, “What the f–k? How come I ain't Superman?” But it just wasn't my time. Hopefully the next one will be.

I doubt it, but whatever. I've worked with a lot of different kids throughout the years, most are completely crazy. I would have to say that you are one of the most levelheaded I've met. Why do you think that's so?

When I was growing up it was so lame to be some cocky kid. So I never tried to come off that way. Maybe that f–ks with me, because I don't think I have as much confidence as some of these guys. All of my friends were the same way. If you were a kid who would roll up and say, “Check me out–I just kickflipped that!” It would ruin everything. I mean when I first got sponsored by Zero, I wasn't trying to floss it. There were kids around who were sponsored, so it wasn't even a big deal.

Do you think you were tainted at all growing up in this area where you could see pros skating almost every day?

It didn't affect my drive and passion for skateboarding at all. I think it just made me realize and get more of an idea of what it could be like to turn pro or pursue a career in skating.

So, how's the girl situation?

Ah, naw. I don't really want to get into that one.

What? Why? I could be trying to take this somewhere. You don't know where this might lead.

All right, all right, all right. The girl situation is …

I'm trying to get you to cry.

I f–kin' miss her (laughs).

Okay, quickly. In five seconds tell me your top three favorite skaters who don't ride for a company that you ride for. Ready? Go! Five, four …

Wait! No! Hold on! Okay, Danny Way.

Three …

Uh, Mike Carroll …

Two …

And uh, uh, Jason Lee.

Jason Lee? How do you know about Jason Lee?

I just really loved him in Mallrats. Also he's skating again.

Oh, you've skated with him?

Naw, I just saw the kickflip tail sequence in the magazine.

So you're feeling him just from seeing him in the magazines?

Well no. Before I knew he was an actor, I used to watch that Airwalk video. It was sick, he was just cruising around.

No Stereo videos?

I've seen Video Days since then. Wait, which Stereo video? Was there more than one? No, I guess no Stereo. Oh wait, (John) Cardiel! F–k, it was too quick.

So how did riding for Mystery come about?

Well, first off it started as (Matt) Mumford's deal, and for whatever reasons he decided he was off it. (Ryan) Smith was already down for it, and Lindsey basically got “Deebo'd” into doing it.

What do you mean “Deebo'd”?

Just like, “Lindsey, you should really do this. This would be better for you.” And at that point they came to me and hit me up to ride for it. I was just thinking, “What the hell am I doing on Zero?” I mean there was a whole new group of dudes that I didn't even know riding for Zero. They're all my boys now, but at the time I was hanging with Smith and Lindsey more, so it felt right. And then (Adrian) Lopez came over, so it's perfect.

Where do you guys live now?

We all moved into a compound in Vista. Zero is paying half of the rent to keep a room open for anybody who might come into town. It's the “Heaven's Gate” room. Two sets of identical bunk beds in a small room. Just like the Heaven's Gate people in Rancho (Bernardo) who committed suicide. (Dan) Murphy put out four sets of black Nikes for all the beds.

Who all lives there?

Dan Murphy, Filmer Matt, Crazy Tommy, whoever is in town at the time, and me.

Who's next to turn pro for Mystery?

I don't really know. I would like to see Lindsey. He's coming off of surgery, so we'll have to see. Lindsey has really only had one video part, but today that seems to be the norm.

Who is your favorite amateur skater out right now?

Uh … it's a wrap.

k beds in a small room. Just like the Heaven's Gate people in Rancho (Bernardo) who committed suicide. (Dan) Murphy put out four sets of black Nikes for all the beds.

Who all lives there?

Dan Murphy, Filmer Matt, Crazy Tommy, whoever is in town at the time, and me.

Who's next to turn pro for Mystery?

I don't really know. I would like to see Lindsey. He's coming off of surgery, so we'll have to see. Lindsey has really only had one video part, but today that seems to be the norm.

Who is your favorite amateur skater out right now?

Uh … it's a wrap.