Skateboarding’s Steady Staple

Despite having fluctuated in popularity over the years, the backyard mini ramp has been steady refuge and a savior for generations of skateboarders.

There?s no doubt that it will always remain as such.

Skateboarding is currently fawning in the backyard ramp revival. Today, America is saturated with skateparks. They?ve popped up everywhere, their rules typically demand the use of safety gear, and they charge fees to skate. That?s in addition to the often-obvious presence of skateboarders diverse in both skill and age at skateparks. The throngs of skateboarders are forced to ride together in tight spaces, and this can easily put a damper on any skate session.

Surely, nothing beats the convenience and satisfaction of a backyard mini ramp. Never has, and?in its rawest form?probably never will.

In this issue, SKATE Biz takes a look at some backyard mini ramps from around the U.S.A., Canada, and England. Some have skated these ramps while passing through the area, and others session them regularly. Regardless, these ramps have a significant place in the lives and memories of those who know them.

Nick?s Ramp in Pine Brook, New Jersey

When were you built?

I was built in the autumn of 1996 due to a lack of skate spots in the area. I became a necessity because skateboarding wasn?t as widely accepted as it is today. Back then, mini ramps were even less common than street spots and skateparks?still seems to be.

Who built you?

My owner, Nick Kuzmak built the framework with his buddy Jeff DeVoce. They stole all the wood from a construction site and constructed the frame. After this, their friends Tim Van DerBas, Jerry Mikus, and Rob Brink helped layer, paint, seal, and put the finishing touches on?like lights, platforms, and benches on the platforms.

How long did it take to build you?

My frame took a week, and the rest of me took about three days more.

How much did you cost?

Well, considering all the wood was stolen, the screws, paint, sealant, and coping cost about 120 dollars. Pretty cheap, eh? Re-layering me with fresh plywood and sealant is about 140 dollars.

Who designed you?

Mr. Kuzmak.

What are your dimensions?

I?m four feet high and sixteen feet wide with a five-foot-high and four-foot-wide extension. My platforms are each four feet wide, and from platform to platform I measure about 30 feet. Ten of those feet are my flatbottom.

Who skates you?

No one lately. My owner has become an avid fisherman. But over the years, from 1996 to 2000, dozens of local skaters were here every day. Some well-known skaters like Tim O?Connor, Bobby Puleo, and Andy Bautista came by a few times as well. We used to throw ramp parties and barbecues here back in the day, but a lot of kids moved on from skating to other things or got more into street skating. Nick will still jump on me every once in a while.

What condition are you in?

My frame is in excellent condition. I could use a new top layer. I have been through two snowy winters and rainy years since my last re-layering.

What role do you play in your community?

I?m a place for all the skaters, their friends, and girlfriends to hang out, skate, and party. That?s about it. I hear that a lot of the newer, younger skaters ask about me. So perhaps a new breed will be able to put me to use really soon.

Will you live forever?

Only until Nick moves out of his parents? house, which may not happen for a while. So come skate me before then.

Rob?s Ramp, somewhere in New Jersey

When were you built?

Who built you?

A combination of Rob Thomas, Spencer Hau, Matt Reppa, Mat Terwilliger, and Chef Razzalo.

How long did it take to build you?

Over a three-week duration, it took about three full days to build me.

How much did you cost?

Two-hundred dollars. My creators found a lot of wood and coping to help us out. That and three ces of both warm and cold Budweiser beer.

Who designed you?

Rob Thomas and Spencer Hau.

What are your dimensions?

I?m four foot high on one side, and three-and-a-half feet high on the other?with a parking block that is ten-and-a-half feet wide.

Who skates you?

People who drink beer or are old enough to carry ice.

What condition are you in?

Fresh coat of paint. The splinter factor is very high.

What role do you play in your community?

A place where people can come and be themselves, and not be afraid to get dirty. It?s strictly skating.

Will you live forever?

I hope so. I?ll live until the cops find out about me.

Room 21 Ramp, Sacramento, California

When were you built?

My birthday is on the fourth of July (2002).

Who built you?

Many people put in time, work, money, and materials. I am truly a ramp that love built.

How long did it take to build you?

After Zach showed up, about two weeks.

How much did you cost?

It?s hard to say, as a lot of people donated materials that were worth a lot more than the money we spent. Actual cash, about 300 dollars.

Who designed you?

Everyone who helped. Thanks.

What are your dimensions?

I?m a curvy six feet with eight-foot transitions, a tight twelve-foot flat that?s twenty feet wide, but with plans to go 32. I have beautiful three-inch steel coping to “slerth it” upon.

Who skates you?

Rick Windsor skates the most.

What condition are you in?

Well, I?m real sturdy, but could probably use some Masonite.

What role do you play in your community?

I help skaters avoid being thrown in jail for 72 hours.

Will you live forever?

Have you read The Giving Tree?

San Francisco?s Howard House Ramp

When were you built?

Spring 2002.

Who built you?

Matt Irving, Fecal Face, John Trippe, Richard Hart, Ocean Howell?who almost cut one of my transitions in half?and Ryan Burroughs. Not Simon Evans, because he says, “Hammers are heavy.” But Boston Tim “Talba” McAullife motivated everyone and drew my templates. I?ve been a gleam in his eye for years.

How long did it take to build you?

Four years of claiming, then one drunken weekend. Simon Evans said, “It took them about two loads of laundry.”

How much did you cost?

Under 100 dollars, with pilfered materials from all over San Francisco. Fourteen-dollars for a case of Tecate (beer), two dollars for limes.

Who designed you?

Papa Talba.

What are your dimensions?

Three feet tall, almost vert, seven-and-a-half feet wide, a couple of feet of flat. There?s a three-foot stair gap from the raised part of the patio to my lip.

Who skates you?

Howard House, honorary Howard House members, Howard House affiliates, and backyard vermin like mice.

What condition are you in?

I was born a raw dog and I?ll die a raw dog. The Howard House joked about naming me “Steve” but didn?t want to have to say, “I was grinding Steve today.”

What role do you play in your community?

I am playground, garden, public square, furniture, neighborhood bully, neighborhood drunk, neighborhood chippy, and neighborhood mentor. I teach people that things aren?t always as easy as they look.

Will you live forever?

In my mind?s curtain cabinet.

The Ramp At Heather?s House, somewhere in Los Angeles

When were you built?

What is this Dave Carnie shit? Is this supposed to be like “Me, skateboard,” but instead “Me, mini ramp”? I was built last year sometime. I don?t remember exactly when.

Who built you?

A bunch of people helped slam me together. Natas was there, but he didn?t help. He just looked good. Well, he might have done something, but not much. Jeff Tremaine was there, but he did little also. He did Jackass, you know. These are big-time people. They don?t sully their hands with menial construction jobs. That?s a good question. I?m not sure who put me together.

How long did it take to build you?

Just like two days. I was snapped together.

How much did you cost?

I was free. Heather swindled it out of Big Daddy ramp manufacturing. She wanted a ramp and said, “We?ll do a product review in the mag (Big Brother).” So it was kind of like free advertising for them.

Who designed you?

Big Daddy designed it. If I had, the transitions would have been a little tighter.

What are your dimensions?

I think I?m sixteen feet wide and about as tall as a baby rhino.

Who skates you?

Heather and her husband Pat. There?s a weird speed-freak dude who lives across the street, and he?ll come over in the middle of the night on roller skates and make a racket trying to do 540s.

What condition are you in?

The ramp is covered in dog shit.

What?s your name?

The Ramp At Heather?s House. The Cock Gobbler. The Rectum Stretcher. I have lots of names. The Wooden Vagina.

What role do you play in your community?

I help keep drug-addled adults on drugs, yet off the streets and in hospitals.

Will you live forever?

Everything dies, stupid.

The Harbison House Ramp, La Mesa, California

When were you built?

Summer of 1999.

Who built you?

Graham Boles, Tic Bowen, Ky Baker, Tim Ruggles, John Bebout, and random neighborhood kids.

How long did it take to build you?

My original structure took one week to build.

How much did you cost?

Some wood was stolen from construction sites, some was paid for, and some was donated?Thanks, Zack. The actual amount paid for me originally was only about 500 dollars, but as more additions were made?another section was added?at least 2,500 dollars more was invested. There were lots of donations from friends and local skateboard companies.

Who designed you?

Larry?R.I.P.

What were your dimensions?

Twenty-eight feet wide, five-feet high with a six-foot extension and an eight-foot-wide flat-bank channel.

Who skated you?

Steve Benson, Hunter, Lucas, Reuben, Mike and Toula, Bobby Bebout, Jason Ranft, Jerimiah Martinez, Graham Boles, Ky Baker, Tim Ruggles, John Bebout, Tic Bowen, Danny Clapp, Ryan Sparling, Lanceman, Mikey Bebout, Simon, Zack, Brody, Nate, Dave Coyne, Mouse, Larry, Neil Heddings, Paul Zitzer, Brian Howard, Dorian Tucker, Saba, T-Bone, Chad Knight, Matt Beck, Matt Cantor, Ben Seaver, Rick Barnacky, Dominick, Chris, Pat Rakestraw, Gecko, Aaron, Mike Sinclair, Jeff Taylor, Mike Burnett, Jose Gomez, Sean Andrew, Samuel Miles, Whammy, Matt Vasta, Jeff Dewhurst, Frey-train, Gabby, The Gobbler, Dixie, Allan Benoit, Camillio Ramirez, and many more.

What condition were you in?

Superior. I was very well maintained. Best backyard ramp in San Diego!

What role did you play in your community?

I provided a safe place where kids could skate free, smoke pot, drink beer, and leave shit all over my yard. I was constantly hosting nighttime skate jams and parties. Nobody was discriminated against, and everyone was welcome to skate me.

Will you live forever?

Sadly, I was torn down in summer of 2002.

Jamey?s Ramp in Oceanside, California

When were you built?

I was born as a mere sixteen-foot-wide ramp back in 1997. In 1999 I went in for major surgery to close up the holes in my sides. Parts of me are from the original Blockhead ramp in Bonsall, California, built back in 1989. That lasted until 1998 and was built by brothers Dave and Kevin Bergthold, Ron Cameron, and many others.

Who built you?

It was a gang of local thugs called the FMP (Fire Mountain Posse) that includes landlord Jamey Stone and head wood-carver Dave Bergthold, as well as other TransWorld SKATEboarding employees and friends.

How long did it take to build you?

I?m embareir hands with menial construction jobs. That?s a good question. I?m not sure who put me together.

How long did it take to build you?

Just like two days. I was snapped together.

How much did you cost?

I was free. Heather swindled it out of Big Daddy ramp manufacturing. She wanted a ramp and said, “We?ll do a product review in the mag (Big Brother).” So it was kind of like free advertising for them.

Who designed you?

Big Daddy designed it. If I had, the transitions would have been a little tighter.

What are your dimensions?

I think I?m sixteen feet wide and about as tall as a baby rhino.

Who skates you?

Heather and her husband Pat. There?s a weird speed-freak dude who lives across the street, and he?ll come over in the middle of the night on roller skates and make a racket trying to do 540s.

What condition are you in?

The ramp is covered in dog shit.

What?s your name?

The Ramp At Heather?s House. The Cock Gobbler. The Rectum Stretcher. I have lots of names. The Wooden Vagina.

What role do you play in your community?

I help keep drug-addled adults on drugs, yet off the streets and in hospitals.

Will you live forever?

Everything dies, stupid.

The Harbison House Ramp, La Mesa, California

When were you built?

Summer of 1999.

Who built you?

Graham Boles, Tic Bowen, Ky Baker, Tim Ruggles, John Bebout, and random neighborhood kids.

How long did it take to build you?

My original structure took one week to build.

How much did you cost?

Some wood was stolen from construction sites, some was paid for, and some was donated?Thanks, Zack. The actual amount paid for me originally was only about 500 dollars, but as more additions were made?another section was added?at least 2,500 dollars more was invested. There were lots of donations from friends and local skateboard companies.

Who designed you?

Larry?R.I.P.

What were your dimensions?

Twenty-eight feet wide, five-feet high with a six-foot extension and an eight-foot-wide flat-bank channel.

Who skated you?

Steve Benson, Hunter, Lucas, Reuben, Mike and Toula, Bobby Bebout, Jason Ranft, Jerimiah Martinez, Graham Boles, Ky Baker, Tim Ruggles, John Bebout, Tic Bowen, Danny Clapp, Ryan Sparling, Lanceman, Mikey Bebout, Simon, Zack, Brody, Nate, Dave Coyne, Mouse, Larry, Neil Heddings, Paul Zitzer, Brian Howard, Dorian Tucker, Saba, T-Bone, Chad Knight, Matt Beck, Matt Cantor, Ben Seaver, Rick Barnacky, Dominick, Chris, Pat Rakestraw, Gecko, Aaron, Mike Sinclair, Jeff Taylor, Mike Burnett, Jose Gomez, Sean Andrew, Samuel Miles, Whammy, Matt Vasta, Jeff Dewhurst, Frey-train, Gabby, The Gobbler, Dixie, Allan Benoit, Camillio Ramirez, and many more.

What condition were you in?

Superior. I was very well maintained. Best backyard ramp in San Diego!

What role did you play in your community?

I provided a safe place where kids could skate free, smoke pot, drink beer, and leave shit all over my yard. I was constantly hosting nighttime skate jams and parties. Nobody was discriminated against, and everyone was welcome to skate me.

Will you live forever?

Sadly, I was torn down in summer of 2002.

Jamey?s Ramp in Oceanside, California

When were you built?

I was born as a mere sixteen-foot-wide ramp back in 1997. In 1999 I went in for major surgery to close up the holes in my sides. Parts of me are from the original Blockhead ramp in Bonsall, California, built back in 1989. That lasted until 1998 and was built by brothers Dave and Kevin Bergthold, Ron Cameron, and many others.

Who built you?

It was a gang of local thugs called the FMP (Fire Mountain Posse) that includes landlord Jamey Stone and head wood-carver Dave Bergthold, as well as other TransWorld SKATEboarding employees and friends.

How long did it take to build you?

I?m embarrassed to admit that during my metamorphosis into a bowl, I didn?t get any action for about a year. After getting off work at their real jobs, the guys would come over and untangle all of the extension cords, drink a few beers, and maybe find time to cut a few two-by-fours. By then it was dark or time to skate somewhere else.

How much did you cost?

Another ramp died so that I may live, about half of my vital parts were salvaged from the legendary Blockhead ramp, including all of my coping. About 1,500 dollars was donated by some local friends and by the crew who would ultimately session me regularly.

Who designed you?

Dave Bergthold of Blockhead and Jamey Stone, mostly. The bowl design was kind of predetermined by my existing location on a concrete slab and the pre-bent coping. The “butt cheek” is a unique feature, which is basically just a corner cut in half and bent to form a sharp hip.

What are your dimensions?

I?m about four feet tall with a five-and-a-half-foot-tall extension, sixteen feet of flat wall on one side of the 30-degree angle hip, and eight feet wide on the other side. I?m quite tight with my six-and-a-half-foot transitions and seven feet of flatbottom. I?m a human pinball machine with much more speed then you would think was possible on a such a small structure.

Who skates you?

On a regular session you will find Eric Sentianin, Dwayne Carter, Jon Holland, Nolan Woodrell, Aaron Schmidt, Aaron Regan, Brendan Klein, Joe Piccolo, Jamey Stone, Dave Bergthold, Rodney Johnson, and Dave Swift. A lot of others have skated here.

What condition are you in?

I?m a bit haggard right now with my original section gone a little soft, some hole-ripping screws sticking out, and my pool coping all busted up, but no one seems to care.

What?s your name?

I have been called “Shrunken Head” on account of my Blockhead family history, and “Stonehead” because of my landlord?s surname.

What role do you play in your community?

No matter how many skateparks they might build, there is no substitute for a no-rules, no-Rollerbladers, no-pads, beer-drinking, smoke-?em-if-you?ve-got ?em backyard session with your friends.

Will you live forever?

I?ve lived too long to die now, I will always be around in one form or another.

Edd?s Ramp, Herts, England

When were you built?

I was built last year in October after my owner quit his job. He had quite a bit of time on his hands. It was Halloween, so everyone came round in costumes for the first skate.

Who built you?

Edd, Toby Bachelor, Stuart, Scott, and Ben Cumbel.

How long did it take to build you?

Approximately two weeks.

How much did you cost?

Around 250 pounds, which is about 400 dollars.

Who designed you?

Edd designed me after seeing Charlie Wilkins ride a similar ramp in a Maple video.

What are your dimensions?

Eleven feet wide, a four-foot transition, and two feet high, with a two-foot over-vert extension with pool coping.

Who skates you?

Most of the people who come live around the village where I live.

What condition are you in?

Two holes in the tranny. And the plies are cracked. I need to be mellowed out with another surface of ply.

What?s your name?

Everyone knows me as Edd?s ramp.

What role do you play in your community?

I?ve been important to all the skaters who live around here, or they wouldn?t have much else to go to. Also, we had a random video premiere in house one night and had a session with about 30 people afterwards.

Will you live forever?

As long as my owners keep paying rent on the house.

Ant Ramp, Middlesex, England

When were you built?

I was built around the summer of 2001.

Who built you?

It was mainly my owner, Chris Turner, who is a joiner by trade. He?s thinking of building ramps for a living.

How long ddid it take to build you?

It took three days over a period of two weeks, as it was raining so much.

How much did you cost?

I cost 360 pounds (about 550 dollars), including screws.

Who designed you?

It was all Chris? design. He wanted to learn how to skate a mini ramp, so he thought he?d build one for himself.

What are your dimensions?

I have a six-foot tranny. I?m four feet high and eight feet wide. Round coping and foundations that are all leveled out.

Who skates you?

Just my owner and his friends who live around the neighborhood.

What condition are you in?

Pretty good condition for how long I?ve been sitting outside.

What?s your name?

I don?t have a name, but I guess you could call me the “Ant Ramp,” seeing as how about a thousand ants bit Styley while he was taking photos.

What role do you play in your community?

No one except the neighbors and Chris? friends know about me. I?m really just good for people to learn mini-ramp tricks on.

Will you live forever?

Of course, unless my owner decides to build a bigger one.

The Barn Ramp in Barrie, Ontario, Canada.

When were you built?

In the spring of 1996.

Who built you?

All the Thirteen Skateboards (a Barrie, Ontario skateboard company) boys.

How long did it take to build you?

It was one weekend, and then a few days for finishing touches.

How much did you cost?

It was about a thousand dollars (Canadian?approximately 670 U.S. dollars). All of my friends?we all pitched in and built it.

Who designed you?

Jay and the guys.

What are your dimensions?

They?re four by twenty with a seven-foot extension and pool coping.

Who skates you?

All the guys who built me, and lots of them who didn?t.

What condition are you in?

The re-Masoniting project got ditched halfway.

What role do you play in your community?

A place for kids to steal from. We tried to keep it private, but that didn?t last too long. Kids started finding out and sneaking in.

Will you live forever?

Oh yeah. If not physically, mentally I will.sed to admit that during my metamorphosis into a bowl, I didn?t get any action for about a year. After getting off work at their real jobs, the guys would come over and untangle all of the extension cords, drink a few beers, and maybe find time to cut a few two-by-fours. By then it was dark or time to skate somewhere else.

How much did you cost?

Another ramp died so that I may live, about half of my vital parts were salvaged from the legendary Blockhead ramp, including all of my coping. About 1,500 dollars was donated by some local friends and by the crew who would ultimately session me regularly.

Who designed you?

Dave Bergthold of Blockhead and Jamey Stone, mostly. The bowl design was kind of predetermined by my existing location on a concrete slab and the pre-bent coping. The “butt cheek” is a unique feature, which is basically just a corner cut in half and bent to form a sharp hip.

What are your dimensions?

I?m about four feet tall with a five-and-a-half-foot-tall extension, sixteen feet of flat wall on one side of the 30-degree angle hip, and eight feet wide on the other side. I?m quite tight with my six-and-a-half-foot transitions and seven feet of flatbottom. I?m a human pinball machine with much more speed then you would think was possible on a such a small structure.

Who skates you?

On a regular session you will find Eric Sentianin, Dwayne Carter, Jon Holland, Nolan Woodrell, Aaron Schmidt, Aaron Regan, Brendan Klein, Joe Piccolo, Jamey Stone, Dave Bergthold, Rodney Johnson, and Dave Swift. A lot of others have skated here.

What condition are you in?

I?m a bit haggard right now with my original section gone a little soft, some hole-ripping screws sticking out, and my pool coping all busted up, but no one seems to care.

What?s your name?

I have been called “Shrunken Head” on account of my Blockhead family history, and “Stonehead” because of my landlord?s surname.

What role do you play in your community?

No matter how many skateparks they might build, there is no substitute for a no-rules, no-Rollerbladers, no-pads, beer-drinking, smoke-?em-if-you?ve-got ?em backyard session with your friends.

Will you live forever?

I?ve lived too long to die now, I will always be around in one form or another.

Edd?s Ramp, Herts, England

When were you built?

I was built last year in October after my owner quit his job. He had quite a bit of time on his hands. It was Halloween, so everyone came round in costumes for the first skate.

Who built you?

Edd, Toby Bachelor, Stuart, Scott, and Ben Cumbel.

How long did it take to build you?

Approximately two weeks.

How much did you cost?

Around 250 pounds, which is about 400 dollars.

Who designed you?

Edd designed me after seeing Charlie Wilkins ride a similar ramp in a Maple video.

What are your dimensions?

Eleven feet wide, a four-foot transition, and two feet high, with a two-foot over-vert extension with pool coping.

Who skates you?

Most of the people who come live around the village where I live.

What condition are you in?

Two holes in the tranny. And the plies are cracked. I need to be mellowed out with another surface of ply.

What?s your name?

Everyone knows me as Edd?s ramp.

What role do you play in your community?

I?ve been important to all the skaters who live around here, or they wouldn?t have much else to go to. Also, we had a random video premiere in house one night and had a session with about 30 people afterwards.

Will you live forever?

As long as my owners keep paying rent on the house.

Ant Ramp, Middlesex, England

When were you built?

I was built around the summer of 2001.

Who built you?

It was mainly my owner, Chris Turner, who is a joiner by trade. He?s thinking of building ramps for a living.

How long did it take to build you?

It took three days over a period of two weeks, as it was raining so much.

How much did you cost?

I cost 360 pounds (about 550 dollars), including screws.

Who designed you?

It was all Chris? design. He wanted to learn how to skate a mini ramp, so he thought he?d build one for himself.

What are your dimensions?

I have a six-foot tranny. I?m four feet high and eight feet wide. Round coping and foundations that are all leveled out.

Who skates you?

Just my owner and his friends who live around the neighborhood.

What condition are you in?

Pretty good condition for how long I?ve been sitting outside.

What?s your name?

I don?t have a name, but I guess you could call me the “Ant Ramp,” seeing as how about a thousand ants bit Styley while he was taking photos.

What role do you play in your community?

No one except the neighbors and Chris? friends know about me. I?m really just good for people to learn mini-ramp tricks on.

Will you live forever?

Of course, unless my owner decides to build a bigger one.

The Barn Ramp in Barrie, Ontario, Canada.

When were you built?

In the spring of 1996.

Who built you?

All the Thirteen Skateboards (a Barrie, Ontario skateboard company) boys.

How long did it take to build you?

It was one weekend, and then a few days for finishing touches.

How much did you cost?

It was about a thousand dollars (Canadian?approximately 670 U.S. dollars). All of my friends?we all pitched in and built it.

Who designed you?

Jay and the guys.

What are your dimensions?

They?re four by twenty with a seven-foot extension and pool coping.

Who skates you?

All the guys who built me, and lots of them who didn?t.

What condition are you in?

The re-Masoniting project got ditched halfway.

What role do you play in your community?

A place for kids to steal from. We tried to keep it private, but that didn?t last too long. Kids started finding out and sneaking in.

Will you live forever?

Oh yeah. If not physically, mentally I will.w long did it take to build you?

It took three days over a period of two weeks, as it was raining so much.

How much did you cost?

I cost 360 pounds (about 550 dollars), including screws.

Who designed you?

It was all Chris? design. He wanted to learn how to skate a mini ramp, so he thought he?d build one for himself.

What are your dimensions?

I have a six-foot tranny. I?m four feet high and eight feet wide. Round coping and foundations that are all leveled out.

Who skates you?

Just my owner and his friends who live around the neighborhood.

What condition are you in?

Pretty good condition for how long I?ve been sitting outside.

What?s your name?

I don?t have a name, but I guess you could call me the “Ant Ramp,” seeing as how about a thousand ants bit Styley while he was taking photos.

What role do you play in your community?

No one except the neighbors and Chris? friends know about me. I?m really just good for people to learn mini-ramp tricks on.

Will you live forever?

Of course, unless my owner decides to build a bigger one.

The Barn Ramp in Barrie, Ontario, Canada.

When were you built?

In the spring of 1996.

Who built you?

All the Thirteen Skateboards (a Barrie, Ontario skateboard company) boys.

How long did it take to build you?

It was one weekend, and then a few days for finishing touches.

How much did you cost?

It was about a thousand dollars (Canadian?approximately 670 U.S. dollars). All of my friends?we all pitched in and built it.

Who designed you?

Jay and the guys.

What are your dimensions?

They?re four by twenty with a seven-foot extension and pool coping.

Who skates you?

All the guys who built me, and lots of them who didn?t.

What condition are you in?

The re-Masoniting project got ditched halfway.

What role do you play in your community?

A place for kids to steal from. We tried to keep it private, but that didn?t last too long. Kids started finding out and sneaking in.

Will you live forever?

Oh yeah. If not physically, mentally I will.